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snorring

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snorring

Posted by NA [114.32] on March 10, 2005 at 02:23:20:

i am female, middle age, and for about the past year i've began snorring extensively and loud? this has been about the time i've become very fatigued. what could be going on? my only other history that i can think of that could be relative here are a broken (and reset)nose as a child and sinus, allery problems from teen-ager until now. i don't know why i've became just a loud and bad snoorer? any ideas are appreciated!



Re: snorring

Posted by Ron [1013.1671] on March 10, 2005 at 04:10:24:

In Reply to: snorring posted by NA [114.32] on March 10, 2005 at 02:23:20:

Hi NA,

Has snoring worsened due to a possible weight gain?

Have you become a mouth breather due to difficulty in getting sufficient air through your nose when you sleep? If you awake with a dry mouth, you are likely a mouth-breather.

Ron



Re: snorring

Posted by Barb [2737.1351] on March 10, 2005 at 09:31:51:

In Reply to: snorring posted by NA [114.32] on March 10, 2005 at 02:23:20:

You mentioned "your fatigued", is that before you go to bed, or do you think because of the snoring your fatigued?
I know that I tried an experiment with my husband. He is a heavy snorer. I had him do relaxation exercises with a Yoga video before he went to bed and he didn't snore or snore as bad. On the days that he works 12 to 15 hour days he snores like a mack truck.



Re: snorring

Posted by Nutmeg [86.74] on March 10, 2005 at 12:33:29:

In Reply to: snorring posted by NA [114.32] on March 10, 2005 at 02:23:20:

Hi NA,

Could this be sleep apnea?

Wishing you the best,
Nutmeg



Re: snorring

Posted by Walt Stoll [93.1465] on March 10, 2005 at 14:26:26:

In Reply to: snorring posted by NA [114.32] on March 10, 2005 at 02:23:20:

Hi, MA.

Listen to Barb & Ron.

It could ge a combination of allergy (#1) and the fact that you are aging and finally, in addition to what Barb & Ron are saying, the combination is causing the snoring.

The only thing you can really attack is dealing with the allergies you have lived your life with up to mow. Have you read the allergy archives?

Walt



Re: snorring

Posted by NA-to Barb [114.32] on March 11, 2005 at 01:19:00:

In Reply to: Re: snorring posted by Barb [2737.1351] on March 10, 2005 at 09:31:51:

I, just in general, have for about the past year had a real fatigue problem going on. The fatigue is before going to sleep. I too snore alot worse when I'm really exhausted.

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Re: snorring

Posted by NA-to Ron [114.32] on March 11, 2005 at 01:20:41:

In Reply to: Re: snorring posted by Ron [1013.1671] on March 10, 2005 at 04:10:24:

I do sometimes awake with dry mouth, but why does breathing through mouth cause a person to snore?

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Re: snorring

Posted by NA-to Nutmeg [114.32] on March 11, 2005 at 01:22:02:

In Reply to: Re: snorring posted by Nutmeg [86.74] on March 10, 2005 at 12:33:29:

I hope that I don't have sleep apnea, but what exactly would suggest this/how would I know ?



Re: snorring

Posted by NA-to Dr. Stoll [114.32] on March 11, 2005 at 01:23:07:

In Reply to: Re: snorring posted by Walt Stoll [93.1465] on March 10, 2005 at 14:26:26:

What about aging contributes to snoring?



Re: snoring

Posted by Nutmeg [86.74] on March 11, 2005 at 11:55:26:

In Reply to: Re: snorring posted by NA-to Nutmeg [114.32] on March 11, 2005 at 01:22:02:

Hi NA,

I hope you don't have it either! From what I understand, people who have sleep apnea typically snore loudly or a lot and have great fatigue during the day because sleep is so restless. You stop breathing many times during the night, and then when you run out of air, start gasping for breath again and snore yourself awake. I'm sure you could find a couple good lists of symptoms by doing a google search on sleep apnea.

Many people who suspect they have it go to a sleep lab for a night to be checked out (your doctor would have to prescribe this), but having a sleep partner agree to listen to your breathing, or setting up a tape recorder during your snoriest times would also give you a better idea if this is a likely thing. I've heard of some people resolving or at least improving sleep apnea with natural methods.

Sounds like looking at your potential allergies and your pillow/head position would be a good place to start.

Wishing you the best,
Nutmeg

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Re: snoring (Why does aging matter?) Archive in aging.

Posted by Walt Stoll [93.1465] on March 11, 2005 at 12:37:44:

In Reply to: Re: snorring posted by NA-to Dr. Stoll [114.32] on March 11, 2005 at 01:23:07:

Thanks, NA.

ALL chronic conditions are the result of many factors that combine to finally overwhelm the bodymind's ability to compensate. Aging just causes that compensation to be progressively less efficient and so the same things that used to not cause symptoms now DO.

Hope this helps.

Walt

Follow Ups:


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