Allergy Archives

Allergies

[ Allergy Archive ]
[ Main Archives Page ] [ Glossary/Index ]
[ FAQ ] [ Recommended Books ] [ Bulletin Board ]
   Search this site!
 
        

Allergies

Posted by Glenda on June 19, 2002 at 14:47:51:

I suffered with allergies (hay fever) from the time I was 32 till I was 45. I am now 48 and havent had an attack for 3 years. Can people just get over these like that? I living New England and the pollen count today is 7.8. I awoke with one blocked nostril, a scratchy type feeling where I have to clear my throat, my nose hurts a bit and it feels like there is a blockage of phlegm in my throat. Could the pollen be causing this? I have Claritin, would this help and does this med cause side effects? I feel fine otherwise. Thank you for any input.



Re: Allergies

Posted by Allergies on June 19, 2002 at 15:43:06:

In Reply to: Allergies posted by Glenda on June 19, 2002 at 14:47:51:

Hi Glenda,
It definately sounds like allergies. A great natural supplement made by NOW is called Respir-All.

Follow Ups:


Re: Allergies

Posted by Walt Stoll on June 20, 2002 at 08:42:14:

In Reply to: Allergies posted by Glenda on June 19, 2002 at 14:47:51:

Hi, Glenda.

Allergies can come and go like this. That is just more proof that they are possible to be eliminated by wellness.

See the archives about allergies and let us know what you learn.

Walt

Follow Ups:


Claritin User Experiences

Posted by Jeffrey M. on June 20, 2002 at 11:27:44:

In Reply to: Allergies posted by Glenda on June 19, 2002 at 14:47:51:

I'm no doctor, but I have used Claritin off and on for several years. Its side effects are much less than many over the counter products - especially in regard to causing drowsiness. If you take the decongestant version with psuedoephedrine you may find that it makes you jumpy. I can only take the 12 hour (not the 24 hour) version of the Claritin D (decongestant)- - If you have lots of sinus problems be aware of the dryness that can occur with the use of anti-histamines. I find that drinking lots of water & nasal/sinus irrigation helps with this later issue. - - I would give a thumbs up to Claritin. If you want to save money do a web search for Canadian online pharmacies and you'll save about 50%. Claritin is an OTC product up there, though you'll still need a prescription from a US doctor to fill the Canadian order, just like you would in the U.S.A. It will be coming off of US patent this year, so prices should come down when generics are available. Dont let your doctor talk you into Clarinex. It doesn't work any better than Claritin and is strictly put out in order to boost the manufacturer's profits after Claritin goes off patent. - -



Re: Claritin User Experiences

Posted by Naya on June 20, 2002 at 14:12:38:

In Reply to: Claritin User Experiences posted by Jeffrey M. on June 20, 2002 at 11:27:44:

I agree with Jeffrey. Claritin works fine without any side effects for me, but the Clarinex almost gave me a seizure. I definitely would avoid it. Beware of drug companies pushing new drugs! - especially, as Jeffrey says, when their current patent on something similar is about to expire.



Re: Claritin User Experiences

Posted by BarbaraN on June 20, 2002 at 14:48:03:

In Reply to: Claritin User Experiences posted by Jeffrey M. on June 20, 2002 at 11:27:44:

Its OTC here in europe as well but soooooooooooo expensive. You pay like 10 euros for a package with 8 pills in it. Just out of curiousity, how much is it in Canada? If you practice wellness, you won't have any problems with your allergies and won't need it :-)



Re: Claritin User Experiences

Posted by Walt Stoll on June 21, 2002 at 09:07:51:

In Reply to: Claritin User Experiences posted by Jeffrey M. on June 20, 2002 at 11:27:44:

Hi, Jeffrey M.

So long as you understand that claritin is just black tape over the warning light.........

Walt



Canadian vs. US Pricing

Posted by Jeffrey M. on June 21, 2002 at 10:23:57:

In Reply to: Re: Claritin User Experiences posted by BarbaraN on June 20, 2002 at 14:48:03:

In U.S. dollars I've found a price of about $0.60 per tablet for the equivalent of Claritin D 12 Hour (they use a different marketing name for the drug in Canada). The same item is about $1.45 per tablet in the U.S.A. or over twice as much. I don't have my Wall Street Journal in front of me to do the conversion to Euros. - -



Claritin is one tool for me to use . . .

Posted by Jeffrey M. on June 21, 2002 at 10:38:22:

In Reply to: Re: Claritin User Experiences posted by Walt Stoll on June 21, 2002 at 09:07:51:

I used to take it practically everyday during the "allergy season", but found that my allergies would now extend to a year long affliction. (I live in damp Seattle where mold spores are prevalent almost year long. Pollen is plentiful in the summer.)- - - I have been looking at my overall situation and applying a more wholistic approach to my allergies as of late. Looking at my home environment. Using nasal irrigation & drinking lots of water. Aerobic exercise. Starting a regular program of stress reduction. I would say that my allergies have actually been a blessing since they provided the "warning light" that got my attention and helped directed me to some of these other health approaches. I have already noticed a significant improvement in regards to my allergy symptoms and I would say that my Claritin use is 1/2 to 1/3 of what it was before. - - -



Re: Canadian vs. US Pricing

Posted by BarbaraN on June 21, 2002 at 16:21:23:

In Reply to: Canadian vs. US Pricing posted by Jeffrey M. on June 21, 2002 at 10:23:57:

Thanks :-) And by the way, the euro is at its strongest point since its intro... 98 american cents!! woohoo lol

Follow Ups:


Re: Claritin is one tool for me to use . . . (Archive in allergy.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on June 22, 2002 at 08:27:49:

In Reply to: Claritin is one tool for me to use . . . posted by Jeffrey M. on June 21, 2002 at 10:38:22:

Thanks, Jeffrey.

I see nothing wrong with taking Claritin (It works for a lot of people.) so long as the individual does not let the hidden red light warning distract him from doing what will resolve the problem.

Congratulations on your progress.

Walt

Follow Ups:


Re: Allergies

Posted by Terri-Lynn on June 24, 2002 at 22:53:58:

In Reply to: Allergies posted by Glenda on June 19, 2002 at 14:47:51:

I agree with Walt that it is not a solution only a temporary fix;

I have found with many patients and myself that when the body has less toxins in it, then during pollen season you have less reactions, to the pollens if any; The pollens actually help detox the body from to much mucus in the system. After reacting and being miserable for many years with allergies, i finally got smart; When the season comes around for the high pollen count, about a month before i'm on a strict food plan.

Off all wheat, dairy and off for sure the fried foods or oil's that aren't good for a person; I usually back off of all glutton grains myself and do brown rice or millet as far as grains go; I have not expierenced any symptoms of any misery since, thank goodness; You might want to try it; Of course i take some suppliments that help also;[not medications]



Re: Claritin vs. Clarinex

Posted by W on June 25, 2002 at 18:01:23:

In Reply to: Re: Claritin User Experiences posted by Naya on June 20, 2002 at 14:12:38:

My 12 year old daughter takes Clarinex and it seems to be the only drug that has worked. Claritin didn't last long enough throughout the day, but Clarinex works all day and, like Claritin, it gives her absolutely no side effects. From what I understand, the duration is the only difference between the two compositions, and that's the reason we switched. Are you sure your seizure was due to it? My daughter has been working on everything to eliminate her sensitivites and probable LGS that would cause allergies, but though her health has improved in every other respect, her allergies to dust remain and may always be with her. So she definitely needs some relief!



Re: Claritin vs. Clarinex

Posted by Donna E. on June 25, 2002 at 18:30:35:

In Reply to: Re: Claritin vs. Clarinex posted by W on June 25, 2002 at 18:01:23:

Does your daughter grit her teeth at night? I ask because I had terrible allergic rhinitis growing up and I hate to think of some other little girl going through what I have gone through over my lifetime.

What EXACTLY are you doing to eliminate her sensitivities and "probable" LGS? Because none of my causes were ever resolved, I have had a very tough time. I grew up on antihistimines and barely made it through school.

I don't want to go into full detail, but I hope you are not resolved to the idea that she can never eliminate the causes of ALL her allergies.



Re: Claritin vs. Clarinex (Archive in allergy.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on June 26, 2002 at 09:36:59:

In Reply to: Re: Claritin vs. Clarinex posted by W on June 25, 2002 at 18:01:23:

Hi, W.

What will she switch to next? The Clarinex will surely stop working eventually.

Why not heed the red warning light on her dashboard and deal with WHY she has the allergies?

Walt

Follow Ups:


Re: For Donna E and Dr. Stoll: Clarinex

Posted by W on June 26, 2002 at 21:36:02:

In Reply to: Re: Claritin vs. Clarinex posted by Donna E. on June 25, 2002 at 18:30:35:

In answer to your question, no she doesn't grit her teeth at night. I'M the clencher!
Here's what we did. We eliminated milk which was the one thing that she tested sensitive to. We took a stool sample well over a year ago and under the guidance of a chiropractor/nutritionist, put her on grapefruit seed extract, then Primal Defense and Flora Source for over a year to fix the bacterial dysbiosis. She is still taking 2-3 per day of the latter just to be sure. She's drinking more water, taking vitamin C and Perfect Food and 4 EFA pills per day. There is no longer any constipation, which was her major problem in the past. Her constant colds have stopped, probably because we found mold behind our washing machine and eliminated it. She's in good health now, but still has allergies. She's still taking Clarinex, and we just took her to an allergist who thinks she should stop the Clarinex (he doesn't feel that pills stop stuffiness) and just take Rhinocort nose spray. She's taking both at present. Her allergies seemed to improve after starting the Rhinocort and maybe we're ready to stop the Clarinex.
Thank you, Donna for your comments and concern. Since it's summer and I don't have to worry about her "dripping" in school (which is what used to happen before she started taking allergy medicine) maybe we'll stop the Clarinex after our next appointment and see how it goes. But at this point she HAS to take something, so do you both think that Rhinocort is better or safer than Clarinex? I'm interested in your opinions and thank you!



Re: For Donna E and Dr. Stoll: Clarinex

Posted by Donna E. on June 27, 2002 at 11:34:31:

In Reply to: Re: For Donna E and Dr. Stoll: Clarinex posted by W on June 26, 2002 at 21:36:02:

I can't comment on the meds because they are too new and I don't have familiarity with them. I can tell you that because the cause of my allergies was never cleared up, I ended up with massive nasal polyps. This, despite the fact that I was given allergy medication ALL of the time. Even when the nose sprays came out (Vacenase, Flonase), they did not help the allergies or the polyps. In my adulthood, I finally had surgery for the polyps and had one of my sinuses enlarged or a hole put in or something and I have not had another massive sinus infection since. But, I am in danger of getting the polyps back if I don't resolve the problem behind the allergies. So, in my opinion ANY allergy medication is bad, bad, bad. It is only a temporary relief from the symptoms. And, in covering the symptoms, allows other problems to bloom. But, from the information you posted, I think you already know that.

Another source of allergies is in what she is eating. Allergic rhinitis is not just caused by outside allergens. I am living proof of that. But, you know that too because you eliminated the milk. You know about the other basic things too? Things like sugar, anything that contains sugar, refined carbohydrates, processed foods, etc. White flour and wheat products are often an allergen for people with allergic rhinitis, even though you won't hear that from your doctor. I have witnessed it first hand. I think that if you could possibly eliminate these things from her diet completely, you would see an even further improvement to her overall health.

Another contributing factor for me was bracing. That's why I asked about gritting the teeth. I was really uptight and nervous as a kid and that contributed to the stuffiness in my sinuses, blocked drainage and hence the constant sinus infections and colds. Just because she's not gritting her teeth does not mean that she doesn't do this. I don't think you have to show outward signs of being uptight, worried and nervous to brace.

Sounds like you're doing a great job. I can only speak from my experience because I have no medical training or knowledge. I wish that I had had a parent that was as involved as you instead of one who just wanted to shove pills down my throat and pretend that everything was o.k. It really wasn't her fault, I know, but you are doing your child so much good by being involved and so caring to seek beyond the conventional, allopathic advice.

BTW, I hope you take care of your "clenching" too.



Re: For Donna E and Dr. Stoll: Clarinex

Posted by Walt Stoll on June 27, 2002 at 16:27:43:

In Reply to: Re: For Donna E and Dr. Stoll: Clarinex posted by W on June 26, 2002 at 21:36:02:

Hi, W.

The Clarinex is definitely safer. Rhinocort is cortisone!

You are doing such a great job the only thing I can think that is missing is SR. See "Meditating With Children" by Deborah Rozman. You can clear up your clenching while you are getting rid of her allergies.

Let us know how you both do.

Walt



Re: For Donna E and Dr. Stoll: Clarinex

Posted by W on June 27, 2002 at 16:56:21:

In Reply to: Re: For Donna E and Dr. Stoll: Clarinex posted by Donna E. on June 27, 2002 at 11:34:31:

Thank you, Donna for your advice and concern. I have done all I can with the exception of eliminating all the sugar and flour, etc. from her diet (though she has eliminated corn syrup and has "cut down" on sugar). She also uses a neti pot (maybe you'd like to try that - I recommend it!) and I think continued use of this prevents sinus infections. Surprisingly, she has never had one.
But knowing my child and what she's been through with all these eliminations and rituals, I also know that totally eliminating sugar too would cause her too much misery. When she's a little older we'll try to battle that one, but with all the sweets that are thrown at kids at camp and at school, working on cutting it out completely would be too stressful for both of us!
As far as my clenching goes, I do SR but still clench at night. I use a mouthguard which did a great job of protecting my teeth from damage, but nothing for the habit.
I'm sorry to hear about your nasal polyps - what a horrible thing to have gone through. I'm glad you finally found out how to help your condition in a healthy, natural way. Perhaps the worst is over with since you haven't had a massive sinus infection since your surgery. I wish you continued good health!



Re: Allergies - don't you feel deprived?

Posted by Board member on June 27, 2002 at 17:06:15:

In Reply to: Re: Allergies posted by Terri-Lynn on June 24, 2002 at 22:53:58:

I can't get over how you and so many other BB members have so much willpower! HOw do you all stay away from all these foods and manage to read the ingredients and not order things with wheat in restaurants? I know allergies are uncomfortable but this cure is very hard too! Don't you feel deprived?



Re: For Dr. Stoll: Clarinex vs. Rhinocort

Posted by W on June 27, 2002 at 17:17:54:

In Reply to: Re: For Donna E and Dr. Stoll: Clarinex posted by Walt Stoll on June 27, 2002 at 16:27:43:

Thank you for your thoughts. Why is cortisone dangerous - what does it do to the body? The allergist said that pills don't stop stuffiness in the nose - only sprays do, and that Rhinocort is a better composition and safer than the older sprays. He said that stuffy noses can contribute to learning disabilities and the Claritin/Clarinex doesn't do the whole job. He's going to see her again soon and I'll mention what you said - he's always been openminded. The combo of Clarinex and Rhinocort has made her comfortable for the first time in years and I was going to try stopping the Clarinex (but keep the spray) as her allergist suggested. Now I don't know what to do!



Re: For Donna E and Dr. Stoll: Clarinex Thank you. nmi

Posted by Donna E. on June 27, 2002 at 17:57:29:

In Reply to: Re: For Donna E and Dr. Stoll: Clarinex posted by W on June 27, 2002 at 16:56:21:

nm

Follow Ups:


Re: For Dr. Stoll: Clarinex vs. Rhinocort

Posted by Walt Stoll on June 28, 2002 at 07:06:22:

In Reply to: Re: For Dr. Stoll: Clarinex vs. Rhinocort posted by W on June 27, 2002 at 17:17:54:

Hi, W.

The dangers of chronic use of cortisone have been known publically for more than 40 years. I guess it is time for you to ask your reference librarian for some simple books about it.

Specifially, for the Rhinocort, permanent atrophy of the nasal mucosa comes to mind. The PDR and the package insert woudl go into more detail.

Let us know what you learn.

Walt

Follow Ups:


Re: Allergies - don't you feel deprived?

Posted by Walt Stoll on June 28, 2002 at 07:08:14:

In Reply to: Re: Allergies - don't you feel deprived? posted by Board member on June 27, 2002 at 17:06:15:

Hi, Board.

Better that being sick if this is the problem. Besides this is not forever; only until the causes of the hypersensitivities are dealt with.

Walt

Follow Ups:


Re: Allergies - don't you feel deprived?

Posted by Happygal on June 28, 2002 at 10:08:21:

In Reply to: Re: Allergies - don't you feel deprived? posted by Board member on June 27, 2002 at 17:06:15:

Hi Terri-Lynn,

By following the diet, I'm only deprived of my misery!

How do I follow it? I avoid restaurants completely. I eat mostly whole foods and save time reading labels by not buying many packaged foods.

I buy delicious foods (a little expensive, yes) and have a good time. Grilled salmon with stir-fried vegetables and fresh fruit for dessert -- yummy! Doesn't take much willpower to eat that!

Best wishes,
Happygal

Follow Ups:


[ Allergy Archive ]
[ Main Archives Page ] [ Glossary/Index ]
[ FAQ ] [ Recommended Books ] [ Bulletin Board ]
   Search this site!