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angioneurotic edema

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angioneurotic edema

Posted by Confused on September 21, 1999 at 12:36:23:

I work in a chemical plant and last week there was a release of sulfur dioxide. I had a different reaction to the substance than others. I had what appeared to me to be hives, however for the first twelve hours it did not itch. Instead, it felt inflamed and burned. I am allergic to penicillan, ceclor, and steroids. The plant doctor said that this was not an allergic reaction, but was angineurotic edema, instead. My personal doctor said it was an allergic reaction and prescribed allegra and benadryl. Who do I believe and what is the difference?



Re: angioneurotic edema

Posted by Walt Stoll on September 22, 1999 at 19:05:55:

In Reply to: angioneurotic edema posted by Confused on September 21, 1999 at 12:36:23:

Hi, Confused.

Remember who the "plant doctor" works for. Not YOU! He works for the plant. He will tell you anything to try to keep you from blaming the "plant".

Your doc is telling it to you straight. Angioneurotic edema is almost always caused by allergy and when it is not directly caused by allergy it is caused by hypothalamic stress-effect like we have been discussing on this BB for years.

The fact that it affected you differently than the rest means that you likely have fewer reserves than most and you ought to take it as a warning: you are "operating too close to the edge of your cliff".

See the glossary for any unfamiliar terms.

Hope this helps.

Walt



Re: angioneurotic edema

Posted by Confused on September 23, 1999 at 08:19:36:

In Reply to: Re: angioneurotic edema posted by Walt Stoll on September 22, 1999 at 19:05:55:

I guess my biggest confusion comes with why does it make a difference to the plant if I had an allergic reaction vs. something else, as long as the symptoms are the same. Why is that something worth hiding? It seems we are just talking semantics.

Question: The plant doctor said that there are certain substances that will effect you like an allergy, but really aren't. He gave the example of Strawberries, saying that some people get hives from strawberries and even though it is described as an allergy, it really isn't. He said that the difference is the effect on the immune system and that you do not build up a worse reaction to a "strawberry allergy" as compared to a "penicillan allergy". Should I be concerned that a small amount of SO2 is enough to set me over the edge, or is what he is saying true and it will never get any worse than what I have already experienced.

Other than leaving the place where I work, what should I be doing to protect myself or help myself to get better? My personal doctor is trying to work with my Vitamins and Minerals. She has recommended that I increase my NAC intake in combination with a multivitamin. Will this help, or should I be pursuing other avenues? I do not get hives or allergic reactions very often. They are always chemical based. Though I am careful about the soaps and shampoos that I use, I own dogs, cats, children (hah!) and love to snuggle with all of them, so I know it is not just skin that is sensitive to everything. Any recommendations are appreciated.



Re: angioneurotic edema (Archive under allergy.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on September 24, 1999 at 11:59:36:

In Reply to: Re: angioneurotic edema posted by Confused on September 23, 1999 at 08:19:36:

Dear Confused,

So long as you can be KEPT confused, you are less likely to bring any legal action against anyone. This is well known by the business world.

For me to explain the difference between "allergy" (always, by definition, a serum sensitivity involving IGE, IGM and AGA) and hypersensitivity (exact same kind of symptoms) which is always a tissue reaction NOT involving serum globulins---which make up at least 95% of all reactions---I would have to educate you beyond what the conventional allergist has bothered learning.

The fact that only 5% of people improved by conventional allergic treatment has been known for more than 40 years. 50% improve by placebo effect after 2 years of conventional allergy treatment. The reason for this is that only 5% of reactions are SERUM "allergies".

Tissue sensitivities do not show up on skin tests and so lots of people get treated for "unknown conditions" when their "allergy tests" come back negative--having missed 95% of what is really there.

This has been discussed on this BB for years. If you want to know what sensitivities you really have, you will need to see a good clinical ecologist in your area. You might be surprised how many of your unexplained symptoms are related to this mechanism.

See the glossary for any unfamiliar terms.

Walt



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