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To Dr. Stoll: Occupation therapy - is it lifelong?

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To Dr. Stoll: Occupation therapy - is it lifelong?

Posted by W on August 21, 2002 at 10:24:38:

My daughter is doing sensory integration therapy. Some kids take in too much stimulation and shut down their senses (low muscle tone, almost autistic traits) and others (like her) have a central nervous system that processes too little stimulation, resulting in a personality which is always on too high a state of alertness, and hyperactivity - which is a coping mechanism to keep themselves engaged. This has nothing to do with ADHD, and she does very well in school. Because she relied so much on her vision to compensate for a vestibular system which wasn't stimulated enough (using her vision for things she shouldn't have been using it for) she also was a slow reader.
Sensory Integration Dysfunction deserves a much better explanation, but I don't want to make this too long. To help the problem, she's on a "sensory diet" - does spinning on a turntable twice a day to stimulate her vestibular system, and she does music therapy with modulated music which helps auditory processing dysfunction and her vestibular system. She's also doing vision therapy which has improved her reading speed. The occupation therapy and vision therapy complement eachother.
Here's my question: There has been a huge improvement - no more hyperactivity, faster reading and normal temperament (no longer immediately flying off the handle over tiny irritations). However, I don't know how long term the vision therapy and music therapy has to be continued.
**Here's my question: ONce children "fix" their problems with this therapy, are they like other kids who have never had the problem? Or is there always a weakness and does therapy have to be lifelong? If so, why is there a difference between a child who has been helped and a child who has never had the problem?
(I have often had the same question about LGS - it may be cured, but a cured person seems to always be more sensitive and prone to it than a person who has never had it and always has to be extra careful of a relapse. Please correct me if I'm wrong.) I look forward to your response.



Aha!!!

Posted by
Sue on August 21, 2002 at 15:28:10:

In Reply to: To Dr. Stoll: Occupation therapy - is it lifelong? posted by W on August 21, 2002 at 10:24:38:

W, thank you for this information. I think it fills in another piece of my own jigsaw. As a child I was very upset by doing somersaults, dancing in circles etc. Had panic attacks from the age of 7. Having looked at this I clearly had problems with integrating balance issues, one of the categories described. I wonder whether I can find someone who knows about this in the UK? Any help gratefully receeived ....



Re: To Sue: Aha!!!

Posted by W on August 21, 2002 at 21:23:34:

In Reply to: Aha!!! posted by Sue on August 21, 2002 at 15:28:10:

THere's a wonderful book called The Out of Sync Child by Carol Stock Kranowitz that I highly recommend. I think you may find yourself in that book, which gives very specific behaviors of children who are on both ends of the spectrum. Here's a very small part of the descriptive list for the child whose central nervous system doesn't modulate the stimulation and takes in too much: can be frightened by loud noises, sensitive to movement, gets dizzy or seasick, be afraid of playground activities, has difficulty with manual skills, avoids certain activities, overly cautious, sensitive to background noise, smells, etc., etc. (It's a very long list.) There is so much help out there now and so many people are now able to diagnose themselves through their children!
Unfortunately I live in the U.S. and all I can tell you is to look for a good occupational therapist - they work with adults too with issues like this and there are so many different levels of listening programs, also a therapy called Interactive Metronome which helps with inner timing and a multitude of issues. You have to be careful in chosing the therapist because they don't all do this kind of work. What you've described is definitely a sensory issue; it's in the book, and there have been amazing strides in that field. What's encouraging is how quickly and painlessly this can be fixed. The older the child the more mild it seems because of all the compensation that goes on. The therapist (who said that as a child she hated walking on sand) said that my adolescent has a mild form, but if she had gone there a few years ago she would have called it at least moderate or worse. She had compensated for so many years that it wasn't too noticible and she overcame a lot of issues (freaking out over seams in socks, clothes fitting tightly around the waist). Just like you, I described it as a jigsaw puzzle! I couldn't understand why a child who was extremely gifted in visual/spacial intelligence read so slowly, and why she was hyperactive but focused so well - now I finally know. I think that schools shouldn't just do the vision screening, they should do visual processing screening as well.
But I digress! If you want to learn more about this, you could key into the internet certain key words and read about the following: the vestibular system, proprioceptive system, the central nervous system, sensory integration dysfunction (DSI), Interactive Metronome, therapeutic listening, modulated music, AIT, sensory diet and occupational therapy.



Thanks W! (nmi)

Posted by Sue on August 22, 2002 at 05:58:15:

In Reply to: Re: To Sue: Aha!!! posted by W on August 21, 2002 at 21:23:34:



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Occupation therapy - is it lifelong? (Archive in Brain Chemistry.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on August 22, 2002 at 08:15:36:

In Reply to: To Dr. Stoll: Occupation therapy - is it lifelong? posted by W on August 21, 2002 at 10:24:38:

Hi, W.

You are right about people like this being more likely to have trouble than others but only if nothing is done to improve general brain function in the meantime.

LGS is the same way: if the individual does not do at least some of the healthy things that cured them in the beginning, for the rest of their lives, they are more likely than others to have it happen again.

Since most research indicates that we only use about 1% of our brains, just increasing the brain chemistry efficiency 1% will DOUBLE our capacity!

Life long serious wellness does this by far better than anything else yet known. You should see beginning results within a month and a LOT within a year with continuing improvement for 10+ years.

Get a copy of Deborah Rozman's classic "Medititing with Children" (ask your lending library) for the SR portion of wellness.

See the glossary for any unfamiliar terms.

Let us know what your-all experiences are.

Walt

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