Brain Chemistry Problems Archives

Schizophrenia and gluten / casein - question for Dr Stoll

[ Brain Chemistry Problems Archive ]
[ Main Archives Page ] [ Glossary/Index ]
[ FAQ ] [ Recommended Books ] [ Bulletin Board ]
   Search this site!
 
        

Schizophrenia and gluten / casein - question for Dr Stoll

Posted by Zibskele on August 16, 2001 at 12:01:44:

Hi,

I've an article by K.L. Reichelt and A.R. Seim (_Food protein derived peptides as possible disease causing agents: Examples from schizophrenia and autism_) citing a .96 correlation between incidence of schizophrenia and gluten consumed in the diet found by someone named Dohan.

I know diet fixing can't undo extensive neuronal damage. The person I'm asking for needs - would like - (non-technical) elucidation before making the challenging effort (even with help) of managing diet on a minimal disability allowance, noticeably impaired frontal capacity and in the face of periodic gluten-food craving.

He's going to have to cope after that, if he can, with quitting coffee and smoking. He needs to know it can help.

I'm scouring the internet -- idiotic, heroic, but my only way forward (I have MCS and a destroyed life owing largely to frontal impact of computers - volatile plastics or emf as it may be). I find much for myself, but nothing on:-

(1) mercury toxicity and schizophrenia? (I hypothesise, from seeming metal toxicity/gluten sensitivity link)

(2) gluten and schizophrenia (as in, less technical stuff?)

(3) tobacco/caffeine and escalation of frontal deterioration / nutrient depletion / schizophrenia (?) (okay, skip nutrient depletion, sure I'll find)

(4) n.b. - gluten and mood swings (there was once a lot on this, I believe, but medicine's disappeared into pockets? Person who told me did research on it maybe 60 years ago? but I can't use libraries either, air cond hits me worse)

Please can you help with any (pref. not too technical - but anything helps) info/references? With gratitude if you can - I'm driving myself back into the state I was in a few years ago, and any help means less time on computer.

Thanks. Very much.

Zibs.



I was listening to a radio show the other day....

Posted by LT on August 16, 2001 at 13:00:03:

In Reply to: Schizophrenia and gluten / casein - question for Dr Stoll posted by Zibskele on August 16, 2001 at 12:01:44:

and they were mentioning that omega-3 fatty acids are now being used to treat schizophrenia, just in case you hadn't read that.

Also, although I don't have the references, gluten intolerances have a high correlation to epilepsy and lesions on the white matter of the brain (I think I got those words right) -- just read that last week.

Here's a link to a google search page...



Re: I was listening to a radio show the other day....

Posted by Zibskele on August 17, 2001 at 06:48:07:

In Reply to: I was listening to a radio show the other day.... posted by LT on August 16, 2001 at 13:00:03:

Thanks, LT.

I hadn't read that.

Thanks for the search page, great - I feel a bit silly, I'd got so bogged in "schizophrenia mercury" I didn't try "schizophrenia gluten". Anyway, one of the articles it points to has stuff about omega-3 fatty acids ... er, does that just mean lots of sunflower oil?



no, sunflower is very high in omega-6, and very low in 0-3...

Posted by LT on August 17, 2001 at 15:50:49:

In Reply to: Re: I was listening to a radio show the other day.... posted by Zibskele on August 17, 2001 at 06:48:07:

In general, the vegetable oils (sunflower, corn, etc.) are high in omega-6 fatty acids, which increase inflammation, etc. Good sources for omega-3 fatty acids are fish oil, flaxseed oil, or fresh ground flaxseeds and that just about it. I would stay completely away from canola oil.

I don't remember the details, but it's either the DHA or the EPA which is more critical in treating mental conditions, and one of these may not convert from the flax as well as the other, which means that you may be wanting only the fish oil -- I read this a LONG time ago, so my knowledge is a bit fuzzy. This site (Dr. Stoll's site) may have some fatty acid info in his articles, and you could try searching the archives.

I don't know if the link below will work, but here are some abstracts that came up when I typed in schizophrenia omega-3 fatty acids



when you get to the link...

Posted by LT on August 17, 2001 at 15:51:40:

In Reply to: no, sunflower is very high in omega-6, and very low in 0-3... posted by LT on August 17, 2001 at 15:50:49:

just type in the same words and you'll get some info...the page didn't come through.



Re: Schizophrenia and gluten / casein - question for Dr Stoll (Archive in brain chemistry.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on August 18, 2001 at 09:18:47:

In Reply to: Schizophrenia and gluten / casein - question for Dr Stoll posted by Zibskele on August 16, 2001 at 12:01:44:

Hi, Zibs.

The closer one gets to the actual basic cause of any complex problem, the easier it is to understand and to resolve it.

Once this person understands that LGS causes all of the things you mentioned to affect brain chemistry (see the archives for both) he will begin to unravel the problem.

Let us know what he learns. It would go faster if HE did the learning and put his questions on the BB himself.

Walt

Follow Ups:


Re: when you get to the link...

Posted by Zibs on August 20, 2001 at 16:14:53:

In Reply to: when you get to the link... posted by LT on August 17, 2001 at 15:51:40:

Gotcha.

Interesting. (Couldn't get your search to work, but I looked with Google.) Omega-3 seems to have a bearing on everything I'm hunting for for various people -- Parkinsons (my mom), schizophrenia, memory failure, Crohn's, MS ... and CFS.

In fact flax oil's the single addition that made a noticeable positive difference to me (with CFS) when I was experimenting round with diet (as opposed to elimination of stuff that was affecting me negatively). I'd forgotten which way round the omega-numbers went.

It seems omega-3 gets concentrated in the brain, while omega-6 gets distributed throughout the body. I suppose if we've a culturally deficient diet, it's most likely to affect problems where brain function's involved.

Thanx!


Follow Ups:


[ Brain Chemistry Problems Archive ]
[ Main Archives Page ] [ Glossary/Index ]
[ FAQ ] [ Recommended Books ] [ Bulletin Board ]
   Search this site!