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Baker's Cyst

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Baker's Cyst

Posted by
Richard on October 21, 2002 at 12:01:54:

Hi Doctor Walt! I've been reading through your site and various archives, I'm deeply impressed at your commitment to sensible treatment approaches, beholden to no particular paridigm or ideology. It seems you've paid a heavy price for it at the hands of the Allopathic Inquisition! I had ortho surgery to resection ripped lateral and medial meniscus over two months ago. In my case, the tear was in place for a long time and worsened until a final trauma incapacitated me. Indeed, I saw the camera shots during the procedure and my meniscus was all tangled and ripped to shreds. I began PT which was fine. One thing I did during PT was taking an extra 10 minutes on the bike with increased resistance, in order to get a cardio workout.
Two weeks ago, swelling at the back of the subject knee (left) began. The Ortho-surgeon suspected a cyst. Told me to continue with PT and ice the region too. I had one more session last week. The evening came with a great deal of pain and discomfort. The next morning my calf was swollen to almost twice it's size. I saw the doctor, who suggested that I'd ruptured the cyst. There was discoloration all over the back of my calf and touching this area revealed a hard calcific tube running down my calf from the knee distally. Again the Dr. believed it was a rupture on examination and sent me for a doppler to rule out a clot. The ultra sound showed appx. a 14 cen. Baker's Cyst running down into my calf. The width was appx. 2-4 cen. The tech stated that it was NOT ruptured. The doctor told me that he found that hard to believe (due to the discoloration), but he aspirated what he could and removed roughly 50 mm of bloody (synovial?) fluid. He then simply told me that we would track it and scheduled me for a three week follow up. He did mention that sone doctors advocate removal of the cyst. He claimed it should resolve in two months. It is moderately painful upon extension and extreme flexion. When I suggested that the surgery may have caused it, he said no, it must have been there from the start, I disagreed, having no symptoms until 5-6 weeks after surgery. I told him the initial MRI showed no cyst or fluid in my knee. He doublechecked this and seemed concerned for avoiding blame. I don't want to sue anybody, I just want my knee and leg healthy.
According to what I've learned from your site, I'm likely to have recurrences of this without repair, unless my knee can repair the rent itself? Bracing can be approached by methods like kinesiology, Alexander, etc.? I'm really at a loss on what steps to take. I feel like there's a ballon inflated in my calf. There's a lot of compression. Can you give me some advice on where to look for specific, informed treatment alternatives? I'd appreciate it. After he aspirated the upper calf and back of knee the lower calf became more distended and painfull. Help? Thank you for your wonderful work.

Richard



Re: Baker's Cyst (Archive,)

Posted by Walt Stoll on October 23, 2002 at 08:00:41:

In Reply to: Baker's Cyst posted by Richard on October 21, 2002 at 12:01:54:

Thanks, Richard.

Im MY opinion, you already know more than your #^@*& "specialist" about this or he is just ignoring what he knows because it is inconvenient.

A rent in the capsule is very common with the damage you had. CAUSING a rent during the surgery is even more common. This cartilege (meniscus) actually merges and is part of the capsule and so it is very easy to damage the capsule during surgery--especially as bad as yours was. See any anatomy atlas.

Remember, a Baker's is not a true cyst. It is simply an accumulation of fluid, in the tissue spaces, from leakage from the tear. As much leakage as you are having tells me that someone is going to have to go back in and find and repair the rent to cure this. Your SR and Alexander Technique will only help prevent further recurrence and arthritic damage from what has happened in the past (before the surgery).

As soon as the tear is repaired, the body reabsorbes the fluid. ALL surgeons know this. It is beyond me as to why they would try to obfuscate about it.

These "cysts" do not rupture, they only further extend into adjacent tissue spaces!

So long as there is an allopathic monopoly it will be hard for you to get any better service than you have had. My suggestion would be to go to a sports medicine specialist or an Osteopathic surgeon for help.

Hope this helps explain better. You might also go to your local medical school library and ask the librarian to find you a book about Baker's Cysts. Perhaps certain knowledge of wnat causes them, how they progress, and how they must be treated, will give you more ammunition when you have to deal with the entrenched "Standard of Practice". This is not really "nuclear science" you know.

KY has just passed a law designed to prevent the Licensing Board from harassing forward thinking physicians in the state. Of course it is too late for all those of us who have been driven from the state already. We will see if it helps. In other states the licensing boards have gotten around such laws by harrassing the holistic physicians for other things so they can deny they are attacking them for their practices.

Let us know what you learn and how you do.

Walt



Re: Baker's Cyst (Archive,)

Posted by
Richard on October 24, 2002 at 13:46:27:

In Reply to: Re: Baker's Cyst (Archive,) posted by Walt Stoll on October 23, 2002 at 08:00:41:

Thanks, Walt. Since last writing, my calf pain and discomfort has improved somewhat. It is more tolerable than before. As I mentioned, my surgeon doesn't want to acknowledge thae surgery is responsible, and he is leaning towards blame the PT people, at this point. Clearly, when I went to PT, last time, and pushed the envelope on the bike, I worsened my symptoms considerably. Do you think it possible that my condition could reverse itself without an invasive procedure? Should I wait to see how things develop? I'm 47 and thinking my age may have something to do with my complications. When I was 14, I had my meniscus removed on the other knee, and that was open knee surgery in 1971. That knee ultimately healed fine, even though it was pure butchery. In fact, my entire knee was numb for twenty-six years. On my recent surgical site, I now am having movement problems, seemingly from the "cyst". I can't bend it normally, and when I do, it feels tight and resists. I also get pain that is mild to moderate similar to my pre-surgical pain. I realize that my doctor/surgeon is more of a technician, less of a healer, and that makes me feel helpless. I can learn a lot, but I can't make an informed opinion based on years' of experience and the wisdom and intuition that comes with seeing these syndromes as being one element of an entire human being. So naturally, I appreciate your input. Less walking seems to help, elevation seems to help, but how long should I wait before I determine I need to do more? Why does the orthopedic surgeon seem to think there is an actual membrane containing the fluid? The massive swelling came soon after one exertion--possibly, by avoiding such trauma, I might have a chance of healing? If you think I can achieve this--how long should I give it? If it does disappear, and then returns after my first efforts at exercise, can I find surgeon who knows about these things? Yes, I know I'm copping out a little there. But, I haven't found a list of surgeons who do this procedure on your site, yet. I'm surprised that my surgeon seems so unfamilar with this condition, he claims to see Baker's Cysts very rarely. This surprises me. Anyway Walt, I'd like to thank you again. And, I'm dying to find out your views on cancer treatments? I have a sister in law who has advanced stages of ovarian cancer and has received platinum drugs recently, 6 courses. They had to stop the Cisplatin due to severe kidney damage and anemia and are giving her something else. She's going for 10 to 12 treatments. It's terrible. She's in Russia and goes to Moscow for analysis and prescribed treatment instructions. Oh, it's an entire different issue. But, any pointers to good, really informative links about her chemo and cancer would be welcomed. Thanks.
Richard



Re: Baker's Cyst (Archive,)

Posted by
Richard Again on October 25, 2002 at 11:23:52:

In Reply to: Re: Baker's Cyst (Archive,) posted by Richard on October 24, 2002 at 13:46:27:

Walt, I'm sorry there's one issue I forgot to mention.... If the condition is not a true "cyst". And thus, there is no "membrane", couldn't it be the same as "water on the knee"? Water, which due to the rip in the synovial lining, starts dripping out into new hollow spaces? I still don't understand what keeps the fluid localized--it must be viscous enough, I imagine, for that to be the case. Because, if you touch the outside of my calf, which is yellow and jaundiced, you'll find a hard tube pressing out towards the skin. What keeps the fluid from running down to my ankle?(I can guess that the containment is dynamic, because last week, my ankle did swell up for the night.) So far, your archives are the best comprehensive resource I've found on the web. I'll keep looking, but I'm angry that I can't formally come to you as a doctor. Here is a case of something I find very upsetting. The techies and money magnets doing the factory medicine model, are all enjoying their porches and high-level country club memberships, in the meanwhile, I can't go to a doctor I would choose for all the right reasons (I know I'd probably not go to you even if you were still practicing due to geography, but nonetheless, the fact that I can't have access to one who I believe posesses all the correct criterion to be a healer, but can have a thousand versions of the same mediocrity--well it's upsetting, to say the least). Anyway, if you have any comments, I'd appreciate it.

Follow Ups:


Re: Baker's Cyst (Archive,)

Posted by Walt Stoll on October 25, 2002 at 11:52:36:

In Reply to: Re: Baker's Cyst (Archive,) posted by Richard on October 24, 2002 at 13:46:27:

Yes, Richard, it IS possible.

Your best chance would be to do all the things that would reduce the pressure in the joint: practice SR, avoid exercise except under water, avoid ANYTHING that hurts.

See how you do.

Walt

Follow Ups:


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