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Bakers Cyst

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Bakers Cyst

Posted by
Susan on March 20, 2003 at 12:31:14:

Dear Dr. Stoll:

I was diagnosed with a bakers cyst in 12/02, had an MRI and they determined that I had a medial meniscus tear. I had the tear repaired on 1/9/03, went through 6 weeks of physical therapy and have now been released on 2/24/03 by my ortho and feeling good except for the cyst. The bakers cyst was better initially after surgery but always bothersome. My cyst was very large and into my calf, the doctor said only about 5% of people have one this big. He said I should have patience and that the cyst could take up to 3 months to break up and dissolve. Well, it seems to be getting worse, I cannot bend my knee because of the swelling . . . I've just contacted a physical therapist who specializes in lymph drainage and bakers cyst. I will see her next week for the first time. We have some of the finest ortho doctors and therapists in the country here where I live in Vail, Colorado so I know these docs are good . . . but . . . the doctor says the only way to get rid of the cyst is with surgery (and he doesn't recommend the surgery). He says I may have to live with it . . .

Help! Do you have any suggestions or input. I can't live with this, it hurts to even walk, never mind ride a bike or workout.

Thanks!
Susan



Re: Bakers Cyst

Posted by Happygal on March 20, 2003 at 20:24:31:

In Reply to: Bakers Cyst posted by Susan on March 20, 2003 at 12:31:14:

Hi Susan,

Have you read the archives about Baker's Cysts? I'm sure they will say that the practice of Skilled Relaxation can help.

Best wishes,
Happygal

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Re: Bakers Cyst

Posted by Walt Stoll on March 21, 2003 at 11:29:51:

In Reply to: Bakers Cyst posted by Susan on March 20, 2003 at 12:31:14:

Hi,Susan.

BCs will only heal if the rent (commonly associated with a medial meniscue tear--see a good anatomy book about the knee joint) closes itself--considering that the surgeon did not find it and suture it shut while he was in there.

Listen to Happygal.

Let us know what you learn.

Walt



Re: Bakers Cyst

Posted by
Susan on March 21, 2003 at 12:40:01:

In Reply to: Re: Bakers Cyst posted by Walt Stoll on March 21, 2003 at 11:29:51:

Thanks very much for your quick response Dr. Stoll. I'm trying to find out information about the "rent" . . . are you saying that my doctor possibly did not repair the rent? And that fluid is still leaking . . . can you please explain the relaxation recommendation? Will I need to have another surgery to repair this rent?

Susan



Re: Bakers Cyst

Posted by Walt Stoll on March 22, 2003 at 07:13:17:

In Reply to: Re: Bakers Cyst posted by Susan on March 21, 2003 at 12:40:01:

Yes, Susan,

I am saying that the surgeon did not repair the rent. The fluid is still leaking. Depending up on the size you may need more surgery to repair it.

SR and underwater exercise can heal rents that are not too big.

Walt



Re: Bakers Cyst

Posted by
Susan on March 26, 2003 at 10:36:58:

In Reply to: Re: Bakers Cyst posted by Walt Stoll on March 22, 2003 at 07:13:17:

Dear Dr. Stoll,

I (along with my physical therapist) have checked all his anatomy books and he doesn't know what the term "rent" may refer to. There was nothing in the books. The only similar thing is the rentinaculum (spelling is probably incorrect) which he says refers to tissue on the front of the knee.

Is this what you mean? Or is there another term?

I cannot find anything in the archives about what Skilled Relaxation is . . . also, can you be more specific about the water therapy?

I have an appointment with my orth surgeon today.

Thanks very much . . . just trying to figure this out.

Susan



Re: Bakers Cyst

Posted by Happygal on March 26, 2003 at 10:53:04:

In Reply to: Re: Bakers Cyst posted by Susan on March 26, 2003 at 10:36:58:

Hi Susan,

The word "rent" means "opening". See Webster's dictionary. By "rent" Walt means the opening (I think it might be torn but at least separated) in or between the ligaments of the knee joint capsule.

You can read about Skilled Relaxation on this website in the article by the same name (there's a list of articles at the bottom of the home page), and in the glossary entry under SR.

Water exercises means swimming. You need to do exercise that keeps your weight and all stress off your knees -- swimming qualifies.

Best wishes,
Happygal (Certified Massage Therapist)

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Re: Bakers Cyst (Archive.) MECHANISM

Posted by Walt Stoll on March 27, 2003 at 07:42:15:

In Reply to: Re: Bakers Cyst posted by Susan on March 26, 2003 at 10:36:58:

I< Susan.

Perhaps you and your therapist would prefer the word "tear". The job of the joint capsule is to hold in the synovial fluid the synovial lining makes continuously. Any therapist who does not already know that must have been sleeping though class :o).

The ONLY way a Baker's "cyst" can form is if there is a leak (tear, rent) in that capsule. There is no lining of a Baker's (like in a true cyst) that would produce fluid on it's own. ALL the fluid in ANY Baker's has to come from the normal joint fluid leaking. Stop the leak and the body will reabsorb the fluid quickly!

Capice?

Walt

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Skilled Relaxation-Click on Glossary in the Heading of BB

Posted by Sally on March 27, 2003 at 08:01:09:

In Reply to: Re: Bakers Cyst posted by Susan on March 26, 2003 at 10:36:58:

Stress and Stored Hypothalamic Stress-effect Walt's Stored Stress Article Walt's Stress Management Q&A Archive Class notes for HLTH255N PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY OF STRESS & RELAXATION Dailey Positive Personal Development free on-line or downloadable book on Stress Management
The sum of the biological reactions to any adverse stimulus: physical, mental or emotional; internal or external; that tends to disturb the organism's homeostasis. Should these compensating reactions be inadequate or inappropriate, they may lead to disorders. The term is also used to refer to the stimuli that elicit the reactions.

Remember: MORE THAN 90% OF ALL STRESSORS IN THIS CULTURE ARE **NOT** PSYCHOSOCIAL. They are physical, chemical, electromagnetic, etc. EVERY stressor causes the exact same response in the bodymind: fight or flight. If the person does not actually run or fight, the readiness stores in the hypothalamus. It is this constant storage of readiness that has so much to do with dysfunctionality of mind & body.

Stress Slows Wound-Healing Process (Archives of General Psychiatry 1999;56:450-456.) Researchers believe they have solved the mystery of why physical wounds heal best when patients are feeling calm and stress-free. Emotional upset appears to reduce the activity of compounds important to the healing process. This finding may help explain why greater fear or distress before surgical procedures is associated with poorer results. The researchers measured concentrations of the stress hormone Cortisol in the saliva of each subject. Women with the highest reported stress levels also had the highest Cortisol levels. Numerous studies have suggested that blood concentrations of Interleukin-1 and -8 decline with increasing levels of Cortisol. Interleukin-1 and -8 help protect against infection and prepare injured tissue for repair. As stress (and Cortisol) levels rise, Interleukin levels fall -- triggering a slowdown in the healing process. The findings may have important implications for the treatment of wounds.

See also (a) Sigh of Relief, or a Lack Thereof.

STRESS-RELATED DISORDERS (Probably the SHORT list! :-)
Skin disorders: Acne, hives, other blemishes, eczema (dry skin), psoriasis, Rosacea (breaking of blood vessels to appear rash like on skin), vitiglio (loss of pigmentation resulting in white spots on skin).

Tension disorders: Headache, neck/back pain, Temporal Mandibular Joint (TMJ) disorder, fibrositis (muscle and joint pain seen in women between 25-45), carpal tunnel (stress on wrist due to long hours at a keyboard or typewriter), torticolis (wry neck caused by excessive tension in neck muscles), blepharospasm (eye twitch).

Gastrointestinal disorders: Ulcers, colitis, Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).

Cardiovascular disorders: Angina, hypertension, coronary heart disease.

Immune System disorders: colds, flu, mono, asthma & allergies

MORE STRESS-RELATED DISORDERS
Other disorders with a strong correlation to stress:

Alopecia: Characterized by abnormal hair loss, unrelated to balding or radiation therapy.
Bruxism: Grinding of teeth to wear them down during nights. Habit often forms because people tend to clench their jaws during the day.
Insomnia: Difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep.
Chronic fatigue syndrome
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Depression




Skilled Relaxation-Click on Glossary in the Heading of BB (Archive in stress.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on March 28, 2003 at 06:28:04:

In Reply to: Skilled Relaxation-Click on Glossary in the Heading of BB posted by Sally on March 27, 2003 at 08:01:09:

Thanks, Sally.

Namaste`

Walt

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