Metabolic Type and ER4YT Diets archives

Robert, Eskimos and vitamin C

Posted by Linda J. on September 24, 1998 at 10:53:58:

Hi Robert,

Thought you might enjoy the link below. I started out with the mixed diet and found myself leaning toward the Hunter-gatherer diet. I now know I have an extreme metabolism. Now that the weather is cold where I live I can't seem to get enough meat or fat. I've been searching my family roots to get a clue as to why I might be like this. I think some of my ancestors may have been type B eskimos. I was very suprised to find this out, I thought all eskimos were type O. I always thought that milk products were good for type B, but apparently not B eskimos. It's also interesting that they maybe ate some type of seaweed.

Linda J.



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Re: Robert, Eskimos and vitamin C

Posted by Robert McFerran on September 24, 1998 at 15:15:50:

In Reply to: Robert, Eskimos and vitamin C posted by Linda J. on September 24, 1998 at 10:53:58:

Linda,

I'll check out the link.

People get confused fast when I start talking about metabolic types, blood types and things like blood plasma pH. The reality of what I'm trying to do is simply this:

I WANT TO GO HOME

Home is that place in the past where our ancestors were almost perfectly adapted to their environment. They had exuberant health with little need for doctors or dentists. There were no 'diets' -- they just ate what was around them.

This isn't some fairy tale. That fact many people would consider this a fairy tale of sorts just shows how much we have forgotten.

Most folks perceive Eskimos as folks living on the polar ice caps. The reality is that most Eskimos lived a nomadic existence -- chasing herds of large game across areas as far south as southern Canada.

The blood type B Eskimos is another hole in Dr. D'Adamo's diet/blood type theory. I think Peter is aware of it and he would admit that our current knowledge of blood type doesn't always predict metabolic needs. However he believes the correlation is better than what has already been offered by others and of course it is very simple.

You know that I prefer another method of finding metabolic needs. I don't have an ax to grind -- I just want to get home.......

Like you I'm finding (with the chill in the air) it's getting time to add more fat to my diet (with less carbohydrate).

Bob


Follow Ups:


Re: Robert, Eskimos and vitamin C

Posted by Ignacio on September 24, 1998 at 22:02:56:

In Reply to: Re: Robert, Eskimos and vitamin C posted by Robert McFerran on September 24, 1998 at 15:15:50:

The link asks how could the native people some call "Eskimos" get vitamin C.

Bob has recommended a book which proposes one solution.

Weston A. Price, DDS. Nutrition and Physical Degeneration. 6th Edition. New Canaan, CT: Keats. 1997. Page 71.

"The food of these Eskimos in their native state includes caribou, ground nuts which are gathered by mice and stored in caches, kelp which is gathered in season and stored for winter use, berries including cranberries which are preserved by freezing, blossoms of flowers preserved in seal oil, sorrel grass preserved in seal oil, and quantities of frozen fish. Another important food factor consists of the organs of the large animals of the sea, including certain layers of the skin of one of species of whale, which has been found to be very high in vitamin C."


Follow Ups:


Re: Robert, Eskimos and vitamin C

Posted by Robert McFerran on September 25, 1998 at 00:07:58:

In Reply to: Re: Robert, Eskimos and vitamin C posted by Ignacio on September 24, 1998 at 22:02:56:

Hi,

I still haven't read the link but the liver, adrenals, and basically all the other organ meats are very rich in vitamin C.

How rich?

Beef liver has about 25 milligrams of vitamin C per 100 grams of liver (about a quarter of a pound).

The same amount of beef steak contains no (0.00) milligrams of vitamin C.

Surprised?

Bob





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