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Introduction page to Metabolic Diets

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Introduction page to Metabolic Diets

Posted by
Robert McFerran on August 26, 1999 at 18:58:37:

This is a brief introduction describing the three general metabolic subsets. Foods are grouped into three general categories. Information in this introduction needs to be read in advance of reading the specifics for each metabolic diet.

CORE FOODS will be your best foods. Time has made us well adapted to these foods. They have proven themselves to have a low allergenic potential and can be eaten several times a week. They should serve as the bulk (greater than 70%) of your nutritional needs. These should be the first foods you test upon completion of the Elimination Diet phase.

SUPPLEMENTAL FOODS are important since they give nutritional variety to your diet. While these foods tend to work well with your inherited metabolism they also have a higher potential for developing food allergies. Therefore these foods should be regularly enjoyed but not overeaten. You will probably find your best balance if you eat them no more than once a week. These foods should be closely checked for negative reactions after testing your core foods.

AVOID FOODS are those that are metabolically inappropriate for your physiology. While they should generally be avoided they can often be tolerated in small quantities when eaten in conjunction with your Core/Supplemental foods. AVOID FOODS also tend to be best tolerated when eaten with your evening meal. This group of foods are the last that should be tested following the elimination diet as many will generate symptoms.

ELIMINATE FOODS must be completely removed from your diet. People with arthritis tend to be very poorly adapted to these ‘new’ foods. These foods all have a high allergenic potential. Many (especially grains and milk products) can directly damage and increase permeability of the intestinal lining. This intestinal damage also limits the absorption of important vitamins and minerals. Celiac disease is the most obvious example of this phenomenon.

Celiac disease is associated with a specific intolerance to a certain protein (gluten) found in grains. Common symptoms include abdominal bloating, diarrhea, muscle wasting, extreme fatigue, iron and other nutrient deficiencies and in some cases arthritis. Despite intensive study, the mechanisms involved in celiac disease have not been determined. At first it was hypothesized that individuals suffering from celiac simply lacked a digestive enzyme needed to break down gluten. We now know that the mechanisms are far more complex. A new theory suggests that lectins are responsible for at least some of the intestinal damage. Lectins are molecules found in some foods that can have a variety of toxic effects on living tissues. Current research suggests that wheat germ lectin may be the culprit responsible for scarring of tissues along the intestinal tract.

Until recently celiac disease was thought to only effect 1 out of 300 people in the general population. Today’s research shows that there are more undiagnosed than diagnosed cases. The problem is that many of these undiagnosed cases are latent, and do not show the prominent symptoms of more severe disease. Celiac disease exhibits a significantly higher prevalence among patients with autoimmune disease, diabetes, mental/neurological disorders, intestinal cancers and lymphoma. It is becoming obvious that celiac disease is only the tip of the iceberg, representing a very small part of a much larger group of individuals with grain allergy.

We are finding ourselves in a similar situation with milk and milk products. Lactose intolerance is a condition resulting from the inability to digest lactose (milk sugar). The problem is primarily due to a deficiency of the enzyme lactase. Common symptoms of lactose intolerance include bloating, intestinal gas, nausea, diarrhea and cramps. Milk has been shown to damage intestinal cells in a manner similar to celiac disease in many individuals. Likewise, lactose intolerance is only a fragment of a larger population of people with milk allergy.

Celiac disease and lactose intolerance stem simply from being poorly adapted to a food. While we’re not completely sure of the mechanisms at play we do know that the consequences can be quite dire leading to a variety of chronic disease states. How well we will be adapted to any food is based on how many thousands of years that our ancestors ate it. In the case of grains and milk that time has been too short for our physiology to fully adjust.

For best results you should leave grains, milk and milk products out of your diet. You are STRONGLY advised to omit any of the grains or milk that have adverse effects on your specific blood type (see below). ELIMINATE MEANS ELIMINATE! Simply reducing your intake of these foods will do you little good. A single teaspoon of wheat is capable of doing extensive damage to the intestinal tract of celiac patients. This is another reason why a diet composed exclusively of whole foods is a must. Trace amounts of milk, grains (or their excipients) are found in almost all processed foods. If you insist on trying these foods you will need to use a different testing methodology to measure their impact on your arthritis symptoms.

Most foods will deliver an immediate reaction (within 1-4 hours) after ingestion. ELIMINATE FOODS can deliver a delayed reaction as much as four days after eating. The phenomenon of delayed sensitivity is probably due to damage done by that food to the intestinal lining. Let’s use wheat as an example of how to test an ELIMINATE FOOD.

If you intend to test wheat you should eat wheat (shredded wheat cereal is a relatively pure form of wheat) three times a day with your other known ‘safe’ foods for 4 consecutive days. During this period you will not be able to test any other foods. Closely compare your symptoms prior to and after the addition of wheat to your diet. Of course if you experience an immediate reaction to an ELIMINATE FOOD you should consider it a food allergen remove it from your diet.

In the ELIMINATE FOODS section of the various metabolic diets you will be asked to eliminate certain foods based on your individual blood type (O, A, B, or AB). Peter D’Adamo, N.D., a Naturopathic physician, continued in his father’s footsteps by observing the relationship between diet, disease and blood type. He found that certain foods containing lectins react with specific blood types. These lectin/blood reactions trigger inflammation. Here are the foods that I recommend that you totally eliminate from your diet based on blood type.

Type O

Wheat (note that oats and other grains are often contaminated with wheat when processed)
Corn
Kidney Beans
Lentils
Cabbage
Brussels Sprouts
Cauliflower
Mustard Greens
Potato

Type A

Milk
Kidney Beans
Lima Beans
Wheat
Tomato

Type B

Corn
Lentils
Peanuts
Sesame Seeds
Buckwheat
Wheat
Tomato
Chicken
Shellfish

Type AB

Kidney Beans
Lima Beans
Seeds
Corn
Buckwheat
Wheat
Tomato



Hunter-gatherer Metabolic Diet

Posted by
Robert McFerran on August 26, 1999 at 19:00:38:

In Reply to: Introduction page to Metabolic Diets posted by Robert McFerran on August 26, 1999 at 18:58:37:

THE HUNTER-GATHERER DIET

The original Hunter-gatherers lived in the warm, temperate climates of central Africa. Their diet was decidedly animal based and was supplemented primarily with indigenous fruits. Recent Hunter-gatherers (those living during the last 100,000 years) were different. Lack of game forced their migration into relatively cold or arid climates. While the mainstay of their diet continued to be animals, fruit was not plentiful in their new homes. In many cases fruit was non-existent. These recent Hunter-gatherers became well adapted to root vegetables and other hearty, edible plants rather than fruit as their principal source of carbohydrate.

This might seem like a subtle difference but it is an important one. Those that have inherited a Hunter-gatherer metabolism today are usually pulling from a gene pool of more recent ancestors that lived in these cold/arid climates. A great number of Americans trace their genetic roots back to the cool climates of northern Europe. It is not surprising that they are well adapted to root vegetables and other wild, indigenous plants. At the same time they are poorly adapted to many fruits – especially those that can only be cultivated in temperate climates.


MEATS, POULTRY AND SEAFOOD – It is critical that meat, fish or poultry be eaten at EVERY meal.

Core - All organ meats (liver, kidney, tongue, tripe, brain, sweet breads, etc.) and all dark meats including beef, lamb, pork, venison, buffalo, bison and elk. Dark meats (thigh and leg) of chicken, turkey, duck, goose, Cornish hen, partridge, pheasant and quail. All crustaceans and dark colored fishes including lobster, scallop, shrimp, crab, conch, squid, octopus, abalone, anchovy, sardine, herring, dark tuna, swordfish, salmon, clam, caviar, crayfish and frog.

Comments - Pound for pound these foods have the highest levels of purine needed to create energy in the Hunter-gatherer metabolism. You should attempt to choose fattier cuts of muscle meats (i.e. rib steak) whenever possible. Liver or other organ meats should be eaten on a regular basis.

Our Hunter-gatherer ancestors ate the entire animal. The organ meats were always eaten first since they were the most accessible and easiest to butcher. The Core meat/poultry/seafood’s are skewed on the side of dark meats to compensate for today’s anticipated lower consumption of these purine rich organ meats.

Supplemental – All light colored poultry, pork and fish. Chicken and turkey (breast meat). Lean pork chops. Scrod, cod, sole, turbot, haddock, albacore tuna, catfish, perch, bass, carp, halibut, grouper, mackerel, mahi-mahi, monkfish, red snapper, sea bass, shark and sole.

Comments - These foods have less of the needed purine and fat content making them a sub-optimal choice for the Hunter-gatherer metabolism. However, they do offer a better alternative than totally abstaining from fish, poultry or meat during a meal. If you plan to eat them, these foods will be best tolerated with your evening meal.

Avoid- None

Eliminate - All commercial ham, bacon and sausage.

Comments - These food products are not whole foods since they contain many additives and preservatives including monosodium glutamate and sugar.


VEGETABLES

Core – Carrots, parsnips, celery, spinach, asparagus, artichokes, cauliflower, water cress, sea vegetables (including kelp, dulse, alaria, bladderwrack, and laver), swiss chard and yellow (summer) squash, mushrooms, turnip and rutabaga.

Comments - Root vegetables, sea vegetables and wild green leafy vegetables were probably the only source of carbohydrate used by our Hunter-gatherer ancestors. It is little surprise that we are very well adapted to them today. Spinach, asparagus, artichokes and cauliflower have the highest purine content among vegetables. Sea vegetables have high levels of iodine and other trace nutrients that are important for the Hunter-gatherer metabolism.

Supplemental – All beans including aduke, azuki, black, broad, cannellini, fava, garbanzo, green, jicama, kidney, lima, navy, northern, pinto red, snap, string and white beans. All lentils and peas. Soybeans and all whole soy products (including tofu).

Comments - Hunter-gatherers tend to be less well adapted to these new ‘foods of agriculture’ even though they do possess a moderate purine content. There is a higher incidence of allergy associated with these foods (especially soy). If you over-eat them you’ll run a high risk of developing a new food allergy. These starchy vegetables are also a concentrated source of carbohydrate. Therefore they are best-eaten only occasionally (no more than once or twice a week) and in small quantities as an accompaniment with meat/poultry/seafood.

Avoid - Lettuce, tomato, cucumber, peppers, garlic, horseradish, onions, leeks, scallions, cabbage, broccoli, broccoli raabe, mustard greens, eggplant, brussel sprouts, bean sprouts, zucchini, spaghetti squash, kale, beets, sweet potato and yams.

Comments - Many of these foods will generate symptoms. Some can be used in small, condiment amounts. An interesting note is that several of these foods are from the nightshade family. Many arthritics have already associated the ingestion of nightshade vegetables (tomato, potato, eggplant and peppers) with an increase in symptoms. Researchers have suggested that this connection is due to the solanine (a poisonous chemical substance) content of these foods. I personally believe that the increase in arthritic symptoms is due to the adverse metabolic shift generated by these Avoid foods in the Hunter-gather metabolism.

Eliminate - Check the blood type chart (Diagram X) and eliminate any vegetables that are inappropriate for your specific blood type (i.e. - if you have blood type O you should eliminate kidney beans, lentils, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, mustard greens and potato).


FRUITS

Core - Apple and pear.

Comments –You should peel and core these fruits to minimize the impact of chemical pesticides if organic fruit cannot be found. Fruit should NEVER be used alone as a snack unless with a generous amount of nut butter. No more than ½ of a piece of fruit should be consumed, preferably at the end of a meal.

Supplemental

Currants (not to be confused with raisin), cranberries, avocados and olives.

Comments – Condiment quantities of currants and cranberries should only be eaten with meat containing meals.

Avoid

Melons including watermelon, cantaloupe, musk melon, casaba, crenshaw, honeydew and spanish melon. Tropical fruit including orange, tangerine, tangelos, grapefruit, lemon, lime, kiwi, kumquat, starfruit, mangoes, coconut, banana, pomegranate, papaya and pineapple. Plums, nectarines, apricots, peaches, rhubarb, cherries, dates and grapes. Berries including blackberries, blueberries, boysenberries, elderberries and gooseberries.

Comments – Many of these foods will generate symptoms. Some can be eaten in small, condiment amounts at the end of a meal.

Eliminate - None


DAIRY AND EGGS

Core – Eggs

Comments – Eggs can be eaten on a regular basis but they should not be used as a replacement (due to their low purine content) for the recommended meats, poultry and seafood. Only use organic, free range or fertilized eggs.

Supplemental - None

Avoid – All cheeses made from cow or goat milk. Butter. Goat milk.

Comments – Cheese and butter can be used occasionally in condiment quantities. These ‘new foods’ should not be used on a regular basis.

Eliminate – Milk, buttermilk and yogurt.

Comments – Non-dairy acidophillus/lactobacillus supplements should be used instead of yogurt to assist in re-populating the colon with beneficial bacteria.

GRAINS

Core - None

Supplemental - None

Avoid – None

Eliminate – All grains and grain alternatives including wheat, corn, rice, barley, rye, oats, amaranth, quinoa, buckwheat, kamut, kasha, millet and spelt.

NUTS AND SEEDS

Core – Walnut, filbert (hazelnut), chestnut, almond and pumpkinseeds.

Comments – Nuts and seeds (as well as nut/seed butters) make an excellent snack for Hunter-gatherers. Nut butters can be spread on small pieces of fruit. Eat no more than one or two handfuls at a sitting and pay special attention to chewing them thoroughly. Do not eat nuts and seeds that have been roasted in peanut or corn oil. Trace amounts of other nuts, peanuts and seeds present in some nut butters are usually acceptable.

Supplemental – None.

Avoid – Cashew, brazil nuts, pistachio, hickory, litchi, macadamia, pecan, pignola (pine nuts), poppy seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds and tahini.

Comments – There is a higher incidence of allergy associated with these foods. Many are indigenous to warm, temperate climates making them very new foods for most Hunter-gatherers. Cashews (like peanuts) are actually members of the legume family. Most can be eaten once or twice a month without problem.

Eliminate – Peanut.

FATS

Core – Olive oil (extra virgin and cold pressed are best), flaxseed, borage and primrose oil.

Comments – Flaxseed, borage and primrose oil should not be used for cooking (see Supplements section for details on their use).

Supplemental – None.

Avoid – Butter, safflower and canola.

Comments – These fats can usually be consumed on occasion (once or twice a month) in condiment quantities with no problem.

Eliminate – Corn, cottonseed, peanut, sesame and sunflower oil as well as all margarine.

Comments – Margarine goes through the process of ‘hydrogenation’ to help increase its storage life. Any ‘hydrogenated’ foods have been chemically altered and can no longer be considered as a whole food.

BEVERAGES

Core – Spring, artesian or deep well water.

Comments – Sample different spring waters available in your area. Taste varies with different waters from different sources. Once you become accustomed to high quality spring water you’ll be surprised at the taste difference with other types of water. Spring waters do not contain fluorine, an element added to tap water to battle tooth decay. Use fluoridated toothpaste instead.

Supplemental – Filtered drinking water, mineral and sparkling waters.

Avoid – Distilled water and tap water. Caffeine-free tea and decaffeinated coffee.

Comments – Distilled waters lack trace minerals and are often contaminated with metals from the distillation process. Many find they are sensitive to the bacteria-killing chlorine found in most tap waters. Decaffeinated coffees can contain up to 1/3rd the amount of caffeine as regular coffees. Caffeine-free teas are a safer option.

Eliminate – All fruit and vegetable juices as well as soft drinks.

MISCELLANEOUS

Core – Mineral and sea salts.

Comments – Salt should be minimally processed and a dirty white or gray color. Bright white sea salt should be avoided since it lacks naturally occurring trace minerals. Foods should be salted to taste.

Supplemental - Marjoram, thyme, parsley and sage.

Comments - Other herbs should be tested on an individual basis.

Avoid – Garlic, vinegar, mustard, ketchup, horseradish, black and white pepper.

Comments – You may be able to tolerate small condiment amounts of the above. They should not however be eaten on a routine basis.

Eliminate Foods – None.


Typical Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner for Hunter-Gatherers

Breakfast: Chicken thigh with skin on. Two stalks of celery (salted).

Mid-morning Snack: 1/2 piece of apple or pear covered with appropriate nut butter.

Lunch: Beef liver and sliced parsnips (both sautéed in olive oil). 1 egg (fried or scrambled in olive oil.

Mid-afternoon Snack: One cup of meat or poultry stock.

Dinner: Roasted lamb chops with steamed asparagus covered with olive oil.

The Hunter-gatherer diet is the epitome of simplicity. The main dish for Hunter-gatherers is their meat/poultry/fish. Vegetables take on a supplemental role. The vegetables can be eaten steamed, sautéed, roasted or raw. Meats can be prepared by roasting or sautéing in oils. Hearty soups and stews make excellent meals since they capture the purine rich meat drippings. Microwaving should not be used for cooking but reserved only for re-heating meals.

One familiar problem facing individuals moving to the Hunter-gatherer diet is the continued ingestion of too much carbohydrate. Excessive carbohydrate consumption over-stimulates insulin production in the Hunter-gatherer metabolism. Sugar cravings and fatigue are the usual symptoms as blood glucose levels tumble following a meal. In essence this hypoglycemic ‘bonk’ is tied to the carbohydrate level of your last meal. Experiment with reducing carbohydrate while increasing the fat/oil content of your meals to find the appropriate balance.

While carbohydrate intake should be limited, a meal should not consist exclusively of meat/fish/poultry. It is important that a bit of carbohydrate (either fruit or vegetable) be eaten with each meal for optimal energy production.

Cholesterol is a critical component in the Hunter-gatherer diet. While nutritional ‘experts’ have roundly vilified cholesterol they fail to note that this nutrient is the essential building block in the synthesis of a number of key hormones including cortisone -- our most important ‘anti-stress’ hormone. Hunter-gatherers should endeavor to keep their total cholesterol levels above 185 ml/dl. Total cholesterol levels below 165 are signs of dietary cholesterol deficiency.

Weather plays a significant role in the metabolic needs of Hunter-gatherers. Dr. Watson noted that the Hunter-gatherer metabolism would become more extreme during very cold or very hot conditions. At these times carbohydrates should be even further restricted while increasing fat/purine intake. The opposite phenomenon is seen during periods of mild weather. Hunter-gatherers tolerate higher levels of carbohydrate and seem to need less meat/poultry/fish when temperatures moderate.

These metabolic variances highlight the degree to which our metabolic needs are genetically programmed by thousands of years of adaptation. Hunter-gatherers faced with long cold winters or hot, arid droughts would by necessity have limited access to vegetation. Moderate temperatures coincided with more abundant availability of plant foods. Temperature changes would signal our ancestor’s metabolism to make the proper adaptive response. Hunter-gatherers carry that same metabolic response to temperature extremes to this very day.




The Agriculturist Metabolic Diet

Posted by
Robert McFerran on August 26, 1999 at 19:02:41:

In Reply to: Introduction page to Metabolic Diets posted by Robert McFerran on August 26, 1999 at 18:58:37:

THE AGRICULTURIST DIET

The agriculturist diet was the result of over 15,000 years of dietary adaptation probably starting around 20,000 years ago. The ancestors of the first Agriculturists were decidedly hunter-gatherer in their eating habits. As wild game became scarce many of these hunter-gatherers simply migrated to new geographies where game was more plentiful. Those that remained slowly and persistently increased their consumption of agricultural products while reducing their intake of meat.

In many ways the agriculturist diet represents the antithesis of the hunter-gather diet. The relatively high fat, purine and salt content on which Hunter-gatherers thrive spells disaster for Agriculturists. The individual that has inherited an extreme Agriculturist metabolism must learn to severely restrict fat, purine and salt. Those that have tried vegetarian or other ‘light’ diets in the past should not assume they are the same as the agriculturist diet. You will note many differences, especially the exclusion of purine rich beans and lentils.

The vast majority of type II diabetics possess an extreme Agriculturist metabolism. They should take special notice that their demand for supplemental insulin will decrease dramatically when on the Agriculturist diet. Type II diabetics will usually see that they only need 1/3rd or less of their usual daily supplemental insulin intake. They should not continue to use their normal insulin dose as they may experience a dangerously low drop in blood sugar levels.

MEATS, POULTRY AND SEAFOOD – Meat fish or poultry should NEVER be eaten at breakfast.

Core - All light colored poultry and fish. Chicken and turkey (breast meat). Scrod, cod, sole, turbot, haddock, albacore tuna, catfish, perch, bass, carp, halibut, grouper, mackerel, mahi-mahi, monkfish, red snapper, sea bass, shark and sole.

Supplemental – Light colored pork.

Avoid - All organ meats (liver, kidney, tongue, tripe, brain, sweet breads, etc.) and all red meats from the following. Beef, lamb, venison, buffalo, bison and elk. Dark meats (thigh and leg) of chicken, turkey, duck, goose, Cornish hen, partridge, pheasant and quail. All crustaceans and dark colored fishes including lobster, scallop, shrimp, crab, conch, squid, octopus, abalone, anchovy, sardine, herring, dark tuna, swordfish, salmon, clam, caviar, crayfish and frog.

Eliminate - All commercial ham, bacon and sausage. These food products are not whole foods since they contain many additives and preservatives including monosodium glutamate, sugar and high levels of salt.


VEGETABLES

Core – Lettuce, tomato, cucumber, peppers, garlic, horseradish, onions, leeks, scallions, cabbage, broccoli, broccoli raabe, mustard greens, eggplant, brussel sprouts, bean sprouts, zucchini, spaghetti squash, kale, beets, sweet potato and yams.

Comments – Fresh salads should be eaten on a daily basis.

Supplemental – Potato, carrots, celery, parsnips, celery, , water cress, sea vegetables (including kelp, dulse, alaria and laver), swiss chard and yellow (summer) squash, turnip and rutabaga.

Comments – Carrots and celery can be eaten in small quantity. Carrot shavings but not whole carrots can be used in salads.

Avoid –All beans including aduke, azuki, black, broad, cannellini, fava, garbanzo, green, jicama, kidney, lima, navy, northern, pinto red, snap, string and white beans. All lentils and peas. Soybeans and all whole soy products (including tofu). Spinach, asparagus, artichokes mushrooms and cauliflower.

Comments - Although beans have been used as a staple in vegetarian diets their purine content interferes with the Agriculturist metabolism. If beans are eaten they should only be consumed in small quantities with the evening meal.

Eliminate - Check the blood type chart (on page ?) and eliminate any vegetables that are inappropriate for your specific blood type.


FRUITS

Core - Melons including watermelon, cantaloupe, musk melon, casaba, crenshaw, honeydew and spanish melon. Tropical fruit including orange, tangerine, tangelos, grapefruit, lemon, lime, kiwi, kumquat, starfruit, mangoes, pomegranate, papaya and pineapple.

Comments – These fruits are most effective in reversing ‘metabolic drift’ experienced during overnight sleep. They are excellent choices for breakfast meals.

Supplemental – Apple, pear, plums, nectarines, apricots, peaches, rhubarb, cherries, dates and grapes. Berries including blackberries, blueberries, boysenberries, coconut, elderberries and gooseberries.

Comments - These fruits should NOT be eaten for breakfast but can be enjoyed any time during the afternoon or evening.

Avoid – Banana.

Comments – Bananas may be used sparingly as part of the evening meal. No more than 2 bananas should be consumed weekly.

Eliminate - Avocadoes and olives.


DAIRY AND EGGS

Core – None.

Supplemental – Eggs.

Comments – Eggs should not be eaten for breakfast.

Avoid – Cheeses and yogurt (should be 2% or less in milk fat).

Comments – Small amounts of low fat cheeses and yogurt can be used but only in condiment quantities. These foods should not be used on a regular basis.

Eliminate – All high fat milk, buttermilk, yogurt and cheeses. Butter.

Comments – Non-dairy acidophillus/lactobacillus supplements should be used instead of yogurt to assist in re-populating the colon with beneficial bacteria.


GRAINS

Core - None

Supplemental – Rice, oats and buckwheat.

Comments – While the Agriculturist metabolism is somewhat better suited for grains they should not be overeaten and should not be used as a staple in your diet. Most oats found in groceries are contaminated with wheat. Only use oats if the package labeling specifically states that there is no contamination with other grains.

Avoid – Amaranth, quinoa, kamut, kasha and spelt.

Comments – These grain alternatives can be eaten occasionally and in small quantities.

Eliminate – Wheat, corn, millet, barley, oats (contaminated with wheat) and rye.


NUTS AND SEEDS

Core – None

Supplemental – None.

Avoid – All nuts and seeds including cashew, walnut, chestnut, hazelnut, almond, brazil nuts, pistachio, hickory, litchi, macadamia, pecan, pignola (pine nuts), poppy seeds, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds and tahini.

Comments – The high fat and purine content of nuts and seeds make them inappropriate for the Agriculturist metabolism. They should only be eaten in small quantities (one handful) in the afternoon or evening.

Eliminate – Peanut.


FATS

Core – Flaxseed, borage and primrose oil.

Comments – These oils should not be used for cooking (see Supplements section).

Supplemental – Safflower, canola, sesame and sunflower oils.

Avoid – Olive oil and butter.

Comments – Small amounts of olive oil (preferably extra virgin and/or cold pressed) and butter can be occasionally used with the evening meal.

Eliminate – Lard, corn, cottonseed and peanut oil as well as all margarines.


BEVERAGES

Core – Spring, artesian or deep well water. Lemon or lime slices may be added to water if desired.

Comments – Sample different spring waters available in your area. Taste varies with different waters from different sources. Once you become accustomed to high quality spring water you’ll be surprised at the taste difference with other types of water. Spring waters do not contain fluorine, an element added to tap water to battle tooth decay. Use fluoridated toothpaste instead.

Supplemental – Filtered drinking water and low sodium mineral or sparkling waters. Caffeinated coffee and tea. Freshly squeezed fruit and vegetable juices.

Comments – Caffeinated drinks may be used in the morning and early afternoon. They serve a therapeutic use in assisting the agriculturist metabolism. Most individuals find they can easily wean off of all caffeine after two or three months on the agriculturist diet.

Avoid – Distilled water, tap water and sparkling waters. Caffeine-free tea and decaffeinated coffee.

Comments – Distilled waters lack trace minerals and are often contaminated with metals from the distillation process. Many find they are sensitive to the bacteria-killing chlorine found in most tap waters.

Eliminate –Soft drinks.


MISCELLANEOUS

Core – Mineral and sea salt.

Comments – Salt should be minimally processed and a dirty white or gray color. Bright white sea salt should be avoided since it lacks naturally occurring trace minerals. Foods should be salted to taste.

Supplemental - Garlic, vinegar, mustard, ketchup, horseradish.

Comments – Check the ingredients of all condiments for possible food allergens. Other herbs should be tested on an individual basis.

Avoid –Black and white pepper.

Eliminate Foods – None.


Typical Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner for Agriculturists

Breakfast: Coffee, fresh squeezed orange juice and melon.

Mid-morning Snack: Coffee, with orange or tangerine.

Lunch: Fresh salad consisting of acceptable vegetables.

Mid-afternoon Snack: One of the acceptable afternoon fruits.

Dinner: Steamed white fish with lemon. Steamed zucchini and rice.

Agriculturists should NEVER overeat. It is almost a paradox that the less an Agriculturist eats the better that they feel. This is one reason why Agriculturists do very well on water or juice fasts.

Agriculturists should test caffeine drinks (coffee and tea) for a food allergy reaction following the elimination diet. If no reaction occurs they may find that it has therapeutic benefit, especially during the first few months after embarking on the agriculturist diet. No more than two to three cups of coffee per day should be consumed. Most find it is easy to reduce their coffee consumption or stop completely within 4 months of starting the diet.

Steaming and stir-frying are preferred methods of cooking. A minimal amount of salt should be used.

Agriculturists should make a point to stay well hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids. This is especially critical in hot weather. Abstinence from meat/poultry/fish and eggs is beneficial during periods of extreme heat.




Special Note to Bill

Posted by
Robert McFerran on August 26, 1999 at 19:08:38:

In Reply to: Introduction page to Metabolic Diets posted by Robert McFerran on August 26, 1999 at 18:58:37:

Hi Bill,

I've cut and pasted some of the diets to replace the ones that are currently in existence in the archives. I'm still struggling to get a format for the Mixed Metabolic diet that I'm happy with -- and I'll post something in the next day or two on that.

In the body of the various metabolic diets I refer to specific lectin containing foods for the various blood types. In order not to be too redundant I placed those in the 'Introduction'.

Now it is up to your wisdom how to "put out the old and bring in the new".

Thanks again for all the work you do on this site.

Bob



Re: Back-pedaling on Blood type effects???

Posted by RocketHealer Jim++ on August 27, 1999 at 08:50:52:

In Reply to: Introduction page to Metabolic Diets posted by Robert McFerran on August 26, 1999 at 18:58:37:

Robert:

Thanks for posting the latest versions of these!

I hope the Archives can be updated appropriately.

I see in this new intro a set of Eliminate foods based apparently entirely on blood type. Am I missing something or do I remember correctly reading here lately that Blood type had nothing to do with diet needs (by and large)? This sounds like back-pedaling. Clearly I'm still a little confused on this and I am looking forward ***SO*** for the release of your long-awaited book.



Yep, Jim, you're confused...

Posted by
trish on August 27, 1999 at 11:22:19:

In Reply to: Re: Back-pedaling on Blood type effects??? posted by RocketHealer Jim++ on August 27, 1999 at 08:50:52:

apparently, in your "scanning" of ER4YT, you missed a big chunk of stuff relating to lectins. There is a proven effect that takes place when certain lectin-containing foods are consumed by people with certain bloodtypes, independent of their metabolism. This effect, called agglutination, causes clumping of the blood as the system tries to "attack" the percieved intruders (the lectins). Again, this happens independently of metabolic type or hormonal imbalances, or blood/urine/mucous Ph stuff. Bob has always included these "avoid" foods in his protocol - it's been one of the things most difficult for me to explain to my mother, since she also, neglected to actually READ ER4YT! No matter what diet/program or whatever you are doing, you should avoid the foods on that list!

hope this helps!
trish

p.s. I've had a heck of a time posting this...anything up with the board?



Re: Back-pedaling on Blood type effects???

Posted by
Robert McFerran on August 27, 1999 at 12:30:29:

In Reply to: Re: Back-pedaling on Blood type effects??? posted by RocketHealer Jim++ on August 27, 1999 at 08:50:52:

Hi Jim,

Yes, there is some confusion here.

If you go back and check anything that I've said about blood type and diet you will find that I'm always saying that blood type is not indicative of inherited metabolism.

I've NEVER said that blood type doesn't have anything to do with diet. I personally believe that the effect of certain dietary lectins in creating an immunological response is irrefutable. But that is a completely separate issue from inherited metabolism.

Food allergy reactions have a similar mechanism to what is seen with lectin generated reactions. The only difference is that food allergy reactions give a 'hyper-acute' response after 5 days of avoidance -- while lectins may or may not. I've found for example that potato will not ellicit a food allergy for me (it didn't do it when I ran the elimination diet) -- HOWEVER if I eat potato repetitively it induces inflammation (not in the joint but in the surrounding connective tissues that is quite painful) usually on the 3rd ingestion within 48 hours.

You see lectins tend to accumulate in certain tissues until their concentration goes up to a 'critical mass' that triggers a localized inflammatory response. This inflammatory response is MUCH different from what I see with common food allergy reactions in that they tend to clear fairly quickly (within 8 hours). Once a lectin generated inflammatory response is triggered it takes days if not weeks to totally resolve.

Dr. D'Adamo needs to be complemented on his research with lectin interactions with different blood types. It is valid. The fact that blood type determines inherited metabolism is not.

Bob



Re: Splitting Hairs? Diet vs Inherited Metabolism?

Posted by
RocketHealer Jim++ on August 27, 1999 at 12:51:59:

In Reply to: Re: Back-pedaling on Blood type effects??? posted by Robert McFerran on August 27, 1999 at 12:30:29:

For those who may not quite understand the difference (me included) what's the big difference between diet and inherited metabolism?

I read your wonderful reply and I think that my not understanding this difference perhaps kept me from benefitting from your apparently excellent writeup as I might have (in other words, I got really confused somewhere in the middle of it and I never recovered (days/weeks?), despite reading it several times). There are fundamentally different reactions described here, and different clearing times involved. Beyond that I get confused which is what.

Perhaps a couple of definitions could be added to the Glossary to help with understanding this stuff. Inputs always cheerfully accepted

And/or perhaps the upcoming book will clear it all up :-)

Thanks for your patience with us as you must live within the limits of your gag order.



Re: Splitting Hairs? Diet vs Inherited Metabolism?

Posted by
Robert McFerran on August 27, 1999 at 13:02:06:

In Reply to: Re: Splitting Hairs? Diet vs Inherited Metabolism? posted by RocketHealer Jim++ on August 27, 1999 at 12:51:59:

Jim,

Tell me how you would define DIET.

Then tell me how you would define METABOLISM.

Then tell me how they are different.

Bob



Re: Introduction page to Metabolic Diets (Archive)

Posted by Walt Stoll on August 27, 1999 at 13:55:46:

In Reply to: Introduction page to Metabolic Diets posted by Robert McFerran on August 26, 1999 at 18:58:37:

Thanks, Bob.

Walt



Re: Hunter-gatherer Metabolic Diet Archive

Posted by Walt Stoll on August 27, 1999 at 14:03:10:

In Reply to: Hunter-gatherer Metabolic Diet posted by Robert McFerran on August 26, 1999 at 19:00:38:

Namaste`

Walt



Re: The Agriculturist Metabolic Diet (Archive)

Posted by Walt Stoll on August 27, 1999 at 14:04:06:

In Reply to: The Agriculturist Metabolic Diet posted by Robert McFerran on August 26, 1999 at 19:02:41:

Namaste`

Walt



Jim???? I'm anxiously awaiting your response...nmi

Posted by
trish on August 27, 1999 at 22:17:50:

In Reply to: Re: Splitting Hairs? Diet vs Inherited Metabolism? posted by Robert McFerran on August 27, 1999 at 13:02:06:

nmi



Re: Diet vs Inherited Metabolism?

Posted by RocketHealer Jim++ on August 27, 1999 at 22:44:13:

In Reply to: Re: Splitting Hairs? Diet vs Inherited Metabolism? posted by Robert McFerran on August 27, 1999 at 13:02:06:

Okie Dokie, I'll play along.
According to the OMD

Diet

Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal. This does not include diet therapy, a specific diet prescribed in the treatment of a disease.

Metabolism

The sum of all the physical and chemical processes by which living organised substance is
produced and maintained (anabolism) and also the transformation by which energy is made available for
the uses of the organism (catabolism).

Now as to how they are different... Diet seems to be just what you eat & drink. Metabolism seems to be a much larger subject involving all energy intake, transport, and use.
Really they are two seemingly different subjects. Diet is just one input to the metabolism process.

Sorry, I (still) don't get the point yet.



Re: Thanks for pointing it out so Nicely!

Posted by RocketHealer Jim++ on August 27, 1999 at 22:50:06:

In Reply to: Yep, Jim, you're confused... posted by trish on August 27, 1999 at 11:22:19:

Yes, obviously I missed that chapter/whatever. Fortunately Robert included it in his latest H/G & AG diet "handouts", so I'm getting it late rather than never.

Thanks for pointing out my shortcomings so Kindly. We could use more of that kindness in some threads here lately.



So, you sorta answered your own question..:-)

Posted by
trish on August 28, 1999 at 12:54:16:

In Reply to: Re: Diet vs Inherited Metabolism? posted by RocketHealer Jim++ on August 27, 1999 at 22:44:13:

Jim,

I'm reading along here and of course, can't help adding my .02.

SO...

diet is what you eat/drink

metabolism is what your body does with what you eat and drink

If I'm correct, the point here was to illustrate how Robert's listing of lectin containing foods as part of one's whole diet picture was or was not "backpedaling" on whether or not bloodtype affects inherited metabolism.

I think you read his statements concerning METABOLISM and bloodtype, and ascribed his comments to DIET and bloodtype.

Now, you know the difference!

Robert has been saying that lectin containing foods DO affect people according to their bloodtype, but bloodtype is not indicative of inherited METABOLISM!

gotta go now...my brain hurts...
trish



I didn't mean to be "pointing out" your shortcomings!!!

Posted by
trish on August 28, 1999 at 12:59:07:

In Reply to: Re: Thanks for pointing it out so Nicely! posted by RocketHealer Jim++ on August 27, 1999 at 22:50:06:

RHJ,

Hope you know I wanted to help you understand.

As far as kindness goes, we all get what we give, no? Don't worry so much about it! Your world is what counts.

trish



Re: Diet vs Inherited Metabolism?

Posted by
Robert McFerran on August 28, 1999 at 13:01:49:

In Reply to: Re: Diet vs Inherited Metabolism? posted by RocketHealer Jim++ on August 27, 1999 at 22:44:13:

Hi Jim,

I'm not really sure what you are asking anymore? :)

Diet is the foods one eats.

Metabolism is the thousands of biochemical processes going on in the body to convert food into (among other things) energy. This 'metabolism' varies from individual to individual in similar fashion to skin color. The 'variation' in skin color and internal metabolism are all due to ADAPTIVE changes by modern man.

Why (how) are these two terms tripping you up?

I've always said that In other words your individual blood type is not indicative of the genetically programmed biochemical processes (metabolism) that are used to BY YOU to convert food to energy and other things needed to sustain life.

Bob



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