Metabolic Type and ER4YT Diets archives

Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by VickiR on November 06, 1998 at 13:24:50:

Bob,

We're getting ready to start the H-G diet next week, and I'm wondering if you could provide more detail about how the "allowed" and "avoid" foods are determined. In other words, what is that the "allowed" foods have in common that makes them acceptable (ditto for what makes a food unacceptable). It's very confusing to me. For example, cauliflower is okay, but broccoli, cabbage, and brussel sprouts are not--yet I believe they are of the same family. Ditto for potatoes (okay) and eggplant, peppers, and tomatoes (not okay), which are all nightshades. Peas, lentils, and beans are okay; does that mean fresh? or dried only? Are the pods okay to eat? We love vegetables and are used to eating a wide variety of them, many of which are not included in either the "allowed" or the "avoid" list. How can I know whether an unlisted vegetable is okay or not? Why is spinach okay, but mustard greens are not? What about kale, Swiss chard, turnip greens, collard greens? What about peanuts and peanut butter? Turnips? Are tomatoes, lemons and vinegar excluded because they are acidic? But note that the sample lunch menu includes lemon juice as a salad dressing. Are we talking about quantities here? What's wrong with mayonnaise, which consists of eggs, oil, and a little lemon juice, vinegar, and garlic powder? What about fruits that are not listed (papayas, mangoes, kiwis, strawberries, coconut, etc)? Is sweetness a factor? But peas, winter squash and carrots (all okay) are relatively sweet.

This gets REALLY scary when I remove the type O lectins (corn, kidney beans, lentils, cauliflower, and potatoes) and the allergenic foods (barley, oats, rye, wheat) that are on the "allowed" list. You're on this diet, Bob. What do YOU eat? I'm not saying we live just to eat, but it is certainly something we derive pleasure from doing. The thought of subsisting on wienies, millet, and celery (which I don't regard as a food) makes my skin crawl. I thought it might help if you could EMPOWER us--teach us what the distinguishing characteristics of acceptable foods are so MAYBE we can expand that "allowed" list a bit.

Vicki

BTW, poultry wings are white meat, not dark. Backs are dark meat. Also, it's my understanding that the pH of the stomach is (should be) acidic, while that of the small intestine (where pancreatic enzymes come into play) is (should be) alkaline.


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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by Susan Mierswa on November 06, 1998 at 20:43:46:

In Reply to: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by VickiR on November 06, 1998 at 13:24:50:

Vicki,

You took the words right out of my mouth ! I am an O too and suspect that I am a hunter-gatherer but have been on the fence ( yes, Walt we're here ! ) with all the exclusions to the point that I don't think I will ever eat a vegetable again ( I know that I exagerate ). I mean I have given up wheat and dairy and now most vegetables ! Asparagus and artichokes are only in season during warm months, so do we subsist on carrots, celery, etc ? (My negative thinking may be due to excessive wheat consumption in the past.... )

Thanks for expressing what I have been thinking !

Susan




Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by Robert McFerran on November 06, 1998 at 21:39:10:

In Reply to: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by VickiR on November 06, 1998 at 13:24:50:

Vicki and Susan,

Instead of blasting you guys with all of this at once let's try to find a good place to start -- like at the beginning. The real question that we want to answer when talking about diet is WHAT FOODS ARE HUNTER-GATHERERS (in this case) BEST ADAPTED?

What would be the first thing you would want to find out to give you insight to this question?

Please bear with me as we take more of a socratic approach here. There is SO much confusion and misinformation about what foods are good for each individual. I want you to see that there is STRONG LOGIC behind the answers that I've postulated. Once you know the logic you'll know what to do for the rest of your lives.

O.K. Vicki, Susan -- I await your answers!

Bob


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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by Susan Mierswa on November 07, 1998 at 16:37:34:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by Robert McFerran on November 06, 1998 at 21:39:10:

Bob,

What is it exactly ( mechanism ) that makes one food more appropriate than another for Hunter-Gatherers ? Purines ?

What do you eat when seasonly some of the high purine veggies are not available ?

Susan



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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by Robert McFerran on November 07, 1998 at 18:38:35:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by Susan Mierswa on November 07, 1998 at 16:37:34:

Susan,

If you are white and your lineage comes from Europe and you are a Hunter-gatherer you have to ask yourself what your Hunter-gatherer ancestors living isolated in the cold areas of northern Europe ate as little as 100 years ago?

We do know what some of those things were. Would you like to venture a guess as to what vegetables your H-G kin living in a very cold winter climate ate? Can you also guess what fruits and vegetables couldn't possibly be available to them?

We'll get to the purines later.

Bob


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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by Susan Mierswa on November 07, 1998 at 19:44:34:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by Robert McFerran on November 07, 1998 at 18:38:35:

Bob,

I am white and my paternal grandparents were German but came out of what was Russia. Now I never asked my grandmother who lived to 95 ate but I would guess carrots, turnips, rutabagas. parsnips, daikon radish, and other root vegetables that I don't know about. Maybe even potatoes but those actually originate in South America. She probabaly didn't know what pineapple or bananas were until coming to this country. She probably ate apples or pears or berries of all sorts. If there was a grain it was probably rye or buckwheat, hearty cold weather grains. Maybe kale or collards too for greens. And most likely some beans and legumes indigenous to the area.

My maternal granparents are French and probably ate some of the same things along with dairy. They might have eaten some "lighter veggies in summer. Lots of artichoke, asparagus, celery root, salsify, green beans. Those things I remember my grandmother making me alot when I went to France in the summer. Lots of fish, lamb, fowl, liver pate,some beef. They would also eat organ parts which I didn't like ! Of course the tomatoes that we ate ONLY in season might not have been part of what they had growing up earlier this century. We always had salad and it was made with lots of olive oil.

My paternal grandmother and father were type O. I can't seem to get an answer from my mother, but I think A because my brother is an A. I am an O raised on milk and white bread !

This may be more than you wanted to know. My information comes from anecdotes and observation of my family. I am sure it is not complete.

I find your work fascinating and can not wait for your book to come out. Thanks for the learning.

Susan




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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by Robert McFerran on November 08, 1998 at 00:59:07:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by Susan Mierswa on November 07, 1998 at 19:44:34:

Susan,

Your observations are right on the money! There were a couple of foods that you mentioned that were imports. You caught the potato. It was indigenous to South America and only recently (about 200 years ago) introduced to Europe. You can imagine my Irish surprise when finding that they didn't eat potatoes at all until recently.

Tomato was another import from the America's only recently brought to Europe.

You might also be surprised to find that the EXACT origins of foods are not always known. Most of the written records originate during the Roman Empire. Rome was a major trade hub and new plants were very valuable.

Generally speaking root vegetables were the primary carbohydrate found in cold as well as arid climates. Asparagus, spinach, celery greens and green beans were also indigenous to northern europe. Legumes such as beans and lentils were found in more temperate areas.

Some berries were no doubt eaten as well as walnuts. Almonds were indigenous to China as were apples. Apples and pears were the only fruits that could be grown in cooler climate yet many of our Hunter-gatherer ancestors never ate a single piece of fruit. The same could be said about grains. Oats might have been grown or imported but they were only a VERY recent addition to the diet in northern climates and they were eaten sparingly if at all.


Bob



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What about agriculturists?

Posted by Pam on November 08, 1998 at 16:50:43:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by Robert McFerran on November 08, 1998 at 00:59:07:

Hi Bob,

This conversation interests me and makes me curious about the other end of the scale. I am white and my ancestors were from Europe too, but I am an extreme agriculturist. On my father's side my ancestors were among America's early settlers from Holland, by way of France (Huguenots). On my mother's side the lineage stems from Scotland. They were among the earliest settlers of Nova Scotia. Our family tree is American going back for more than 3 centuries. Can you help me understand my agriculturist roots?

Thanks.
Pam


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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by Susan Mierswa on November 08, 1998 at 22:02:56:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by Robert McFerran on November 08, 1998 at 00:59:07:

Bob,

So is it appropriate to eat turnips and rutabaga in the middle of a Texas heat wave ? I know that my ancestors ate this way, but they lived in colder climates. I have to admit that hot weather really does a number on me and I wonder if I will ever adjust. So how does one eat according to present climate/environment and honor one's ancestry metabolically speaking ?

Susan





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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by Robert McFerran on November 08, 1998 at 22:23:03:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by Susan Mierswa on November 08, 1998 at 22:02:56:

Susan,

Extreme heat might have meant LESS available vegetation for our ancestors. Therefore during times of high heat stress you should further limit carbohydrate. Remember, meat and fish and especially the purine rich meats were the PRIMARY food sources of H-G's.

The reason why the purine rich foods were emphasized in Dr. Wiley's work is that he knew that they were actually used in the metabolism of energy.

I'm pleased to hear that you'll be giving the elimination diet a go.

Bob



Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by VickiR on November 09, 1998 at 13:37:26:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by Robert McFerran on November 06, 1998 at 21:39:10:

Bob,

The patient (maybe I should say "guinea pig") is my husband. His paternal grandparents were from northern Switzerland; his maternal grandparents' surname was Duncan (Scottish?). I'm not sure what people ate in Switzerland historically. It may have included a lot of dairy products as I don't think cheesemaking is a recent innovation there. Meat would have included wild pig, deer, wild sheep and goats, maybe ducks and geese, rabbit, and some fish. If we're talking about "gathering," I would think they ate things like hazelnuts, walnuts, currants, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, leeks and onions, turnips, radishes, rutabagas, parsnips, carrots, beets, cabbage, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, broccoli, gourd-type things (winter squash, pumpkin), spinach, asparagus, peas, maybe sunflower seeds, parsley, watercress, spinach. I DON'T think they ate shrimp, shellfish, squid, potatoes (though it is practically a national food today, as in most parts of the world), avocados, corn, tomatoes, almonds, olives, summer squashes, green beans, okra, cucumbers, peppers, eggplant, citrus fruits, bananas or other tropical fruits. I don't know the history of the artichoke, but its prevalence in Mediterranean cuisines (Italian, Spanish, Arabic) suggests a more southern origin. I can see a lot of correlations between the foods listed above and Wiley's lists, but I am confused by the foods on his "avoid" list that I would expect to have been.commonly available to the H-G in northern Europe (and vice versa).

Anyhow, it may all be moot because, after two days on the H-G diet, my husband became symptomatic (after several weeks of feeling unusually well) and told me (quite firmly) that he felt heavy and greasy and unwell and did not want to continue with the diet. In good conscience, I couldn't insist that he continue so we are reverting to a mixed diet. I plan to incorporate more of the H-G principles (e.g., more organ meats, full-fat milk and yogurt, dark-meat chicken) into our normal diet, eliminate the type O lectins that we are not already avoiding, and see how he fares. In the meantime, we will continue with the skilled relaxation, try to exercise regularly, and hope for the best :)

Susan, this might interest you--my husband LOVES the hot Texas summers. He grew up in Indiana and absolutely hates cold weather. When the temperature drops below 50, he thinks he's freezing to death.

Vicki




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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by Robert McFerran on November 09, 1998 at 18:55:52:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by VickiR on November 09, 1998 at 13:37:26:

Vicki,

Take your guinea pig husband and put him on the Agriculturist diet. 85% of all men in the U.S. have inherited an Agriculturist metabolism.

Be sure to get him to use the CAFFEINATED coffee or teas to jump-start his metabolism.

By-the-way did you say that he gets jittery or doesn't feel good if he has a couple of cups of coffee in the morning without food?

Bob


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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by Susan Mierswa on November 09, 1998 at 22:29:53:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by VickiR on November 09, 1998 at 13:37:26:

Vicki,

Gosh Vicki, your husband sounds like an agriculturist ! Are you H-G ? I am going on the famous elimination diet soon ! Yikes !

Good luck !

Susan



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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by VickiR on November 10, 1998 at 12:54:58:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by Robert McFerran on November 09, 1998 at 18:55:52:

Hi, Bob

Oh, for a simple way of testing for this!

We have restricted our coffee intake for many years, normally drinking not more than 1 or 2 cups per week, with breakfast. He never drinks it on an empty stomach, so I don't know how that would affect him. He likes the way it makes him feel when he DOES drink it, complaining that he feels "draggy" without coffee. (I think the effect of the coffee is exaggerated for him because he doesn't drink it regularly.) The down side is that he becomes habituated to it very easily--even drinking only 2 cups a week, he will often have a withdrawal headache on the weekend.

I had figured him for a H-G based primarily on his being a diagnosed hypoglycemic, his getting indigestion when he took HCl tablets after meals, and his gluten intolerance. For the past several years, we have in fact followed a diet much closer to the agriculturist than the H-G, often eating no meat at all 1- 3 days a week. Testing a pure agriculturist diet should be a snap.

Will let you know how it turns out.

Vicki




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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by VickiR on November 10, 1998 at 13:16:53:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by Susan Mierswa on November 09, 1998 at 22:29:53:

Hi, Susan

The hard-core agriculturist diet will be our next experiment. I honestly don't know which I am. As a child, I loved meat and dairy products and hated vegetables to the point that I would pick the chopped onions out of meat loaf before eating it. My family called me "the wolf". My tastes began to change in my twenties, and now I could happily be a vegetarian. Eating meat doesn't BOTHER me, however, or make me feel bad, and I find I require a certain amount of grease/fat/oil to feel satisfied. I gave up milk products about 7 years ago because I would experience severe respiratory congestion within a short time after consuming them. I found out later that I could mostly prevent those symptoms by taking HCl tablets after a meal, but by then I had lost my appetite for milk [still have a fondness for good yogurt, cheesecake, and homemade ice cream though :)]. Nightshade vegetables don't like me much, although I love them. Other than that, I can eat just about anything that doesn't eat me first.

Good luck with the elimination diet. We discovered my husband's wheat intolerance that way (using a different elimination diet, however). It came as quite a surprise because we had gone on the diet to find out if anything besides milk was causing me to have breathing problems.

Vicki



Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by Robert McFerran on November 10, 1998 at 16:50:30:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by VickiR on November 10, 1998 at 12:54:58:

Vicki,

Your guinea pigs', er, husbands' reaction to coffee suggest to me that he is probably an Agriculturist. Please be sure to give him coffee as suggested by Dr. Wiley as a theraputic assist. If he is an EXTREME Agriculturist he'll need it. Don't worry about long term addictions to coffee and caffeine either. As he eats in the appropriate manner his metabolism won't experience the large swings that it does now (right now the coffee helps him swing back in the proper direction). Usually after about 6 weeks or so most Agriculturists can completely quit the coffee with no withdrawl.

I am curious about the diagnosis of hypoglycemia. Can you call your doc and get the values of his blood sugar during the five hour glucose tolerance test? Also ask what your hubby's uric acid level and cholesterol (including HDL/LDL ratio) were.

Bob


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Re: What about agriculturists?

Posted by Robert McFerran on November 11, 1998 at 00:46:34:

In Reply to: What about agriculturists? posted by Pam on November 08, 1998 at 16:50:43:

Pam,

Here is a section from my book that describes in greater detail (perhaps more than you want to know) how the three metabolic subsets emerged.


Anthropologists know that ‘human-like’ species have been around for over four million years. However it wasn’t until about 100,000 years ago that humans finally began to flourish. Anthropologists would label this latest triumph of the human evolutionary process as ‘Modern Man’. Natural selection had finally provided humans with an anatomy and physiology that was capable of coping successfully with all aspects of their environment. Up until that time their predecessors only existed in small numbers. Their survival was tenuous at best. Small changes in environment would spell disaster, ultimately leading to their demise. By contrast Modern Man not only survived but thrived. This most recent human prototype (living some 100,000 years ago) looked very much like us today. In fact you would have trouble picking out one of our 100,000 year old ancestors in a crowded room.

Population growth provided evidence showing the success of the evolving human race. For the first 4 million years of human existence the total population went through a series of precipitous contractions and expansions but never exceeded 75,000. Human population broke through this barrier some 100,000 years ago reaching a new peak of 80,000 people. The majority of them were concentrated in Central Africa. During the next 90,000 years Modern Man would sustain unprecedented growth. Humans were no longer limited to the temperate environment of Central Africa, rather they would successfully migrate to cover all inhabitable parts of the globe. From 100,000 to 10,000 years ago the population would grow from 80,000 to over five million people.

Skeletal remains show that Modern Man migrated north from their central African homeland about 60,000 years ago. The initial migrations took them into the Middle East and Europe. Their expansion continued as they slowly pushed eastward though Asia and the Far East. Modern Man entered North America via Siberia about 15,000 years ago. The racial differences that we see today are a result of man’s adaptation to climate as he made these movements. The climactic changes during this period not only allowed but promoted these migrations. The earth was coming out of an ice age and the frozen areas of the north were beginning to thaw while the temperate regions of central African (what is now the Sahara Desert) were becoming arid.

We tend to think that our current generation is physically superior to our human predecessors that made these migrations. Think again. Deprived of our technology, it’s doubtful that we could accomplish the same feat. Our predecessors were at the pinnacle of health. Even though they had to deal with momentous change as they made these migrations the rate of change was still slow enough to allow successful adaptation (remember true adaptation requires a minimum of several thousand years). The rate of change never outstripped their physiological ability to adapt. Since their physiology was well adapted to all aspects of their surroundings they had vast stores of immunological reserves available to deal with cold, hunger, parasites, infectious organisms as well as other type of stress. They did not suffer from the chronic diseases we face today.

Man’s diet was much the same from their inception over four million years ago until the ‘invention’ of agriculture. Prior to the introduction of agriculture Man was exclusively what archeologists refer to as a ‘hunter-gatherer’. Their primary source of nutrition was derived largely from fish and animals, supplemented with smaller amounts of gathered vegetation. Modern Man’s ability to hunt and bring down large game has been often underestimated.. Anthropologists now know that they were expert hunters using nets and pits as well as spears, bows and arrows to bring down their prey. In fact their success fueled t


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Re: What about agriculturists?

Posted by Susan Mierswa on November 11, 1998 at 10:28:50:

In Reply to: Re: What about agriculturists? posted by Robert McFerran on November 11, 1998 at 00:46:34:

Bob,

I was wondering about the Native American and corn ! How was this grain introduced 6,500 years ago ? I mean you get the impression from our elementary history classes that it was the European settlers who taught them how to "agriculture". And why would they want to grow corn ? Were there diminishing game supplies ? Arthritis, huh !

Susan



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Re: What about agriculturists?

Posted by Robert McFerran on November 11, 1998 at 12:26:08:

In Reply to: Re: What about agriculturists? posted by Susan Mierswa on November 11, 1998 at 10:28:50:

Susaan,

Corn was indiginous to North America. It grew wild. Some Indian tribes would not eat it at all while other tribes would only gather the wild form and eat it occassionally. Apparently their body/minds were SO sensitive that they knew it was not the best food for their metabolism.

Around 6,500 years ago some small groups of Indians did start to cultivate corn and use it as more as a staple in their diet. It probably was a reaction to thinning populations of game animals in that specific locale. The change itself was TOO RAPID and resulted in the first degenerative types of arthritis.

European settlers DID teach Indians in the Northeast regions of North America to cultivate corn amoung other things. The Indians in that area probably only occassionally ate it in the wild form prior to becoming 'civilized'.

This little example of a group of people becoming rapidly maladapted to their food in a short period of time might be played out again with the ongoing genetic tampering of our food supply.

Another point that you make is just because a food is indigenous to an area we can't assume the natives ate it.


Bob



Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by VickiR on November 13, 1998 at 10:54:25:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by Robert McFerran on November 10, 1998 at 16:50:30:

Bob,

The only actual 5-hr blood sugar numbers I have are from two glucose level tests we did at home in August and November, 1993, using Dextrostix. He fasted for 36 hours before each test. In the first test, thirty minutes after eating a normal breakfast of cereal with milk, my husband's blood glucose level had risen from 90 mg percent to 190. Thirty minutes after that, it had dropped to 175. We tested at 30-min intervals for the first 2 hrs and hourly after that. At the end of the second hour, the level was at 130.

In the second test, his fasting glucose level was 95 mg/dl, rose to 250 30 min after eating, dropped to 180 after the next 30 minutes, to 150 at the end of 1 hr, to 130 after 1 1/2 hrs. At the end of the 5 hours, his glucose level was back at fasting level.

According to Dr Philpott's description of hypoglycemia, the fact that the entire rise in glucose level occurred during the first 30 minutes, followed by a 70 percent drop in the next 30 minutes, and a one-hour level that was more than 50% greater than the fasting level are enough to confirm hypoglycemia. In 1994, he was diagnosed at the Carl Pfeiffer Treatment Center in Illinois as hypoglycemic, but they did not do a 5-hr test.

In April 94, his fasting glucose level was 84 mg/dl, his uric acid level was 3.9 mg/dl, total cholesterol was 211 mg/dl, and his HDL/LDL ratio was 3.98. In May 96, his fassting glucose level was 89 mg/dl, his uric acid level was 4.6 mg/dl, total cholesterol was down to 171 mg/dl, and his ratio was 3.7. Uric acid and HDL/LDL have not been tested since then, but his total cholesterol has been steadily declining. It was 180 in Apr 98, 168 in July, and 162 at end of October.

Other items from his bloodwork in '94 and '96 that might be significant: 1. Enzymes tested appear to be on low side of normal (SGOT = 14 IU/I, SGPT = 15, alkaline phosphatase = 47, LDH = 242 in '94, 147 in '96, YGT = 9).
2. Blood tests showed phosporus, chloride and magnesium to be on the high side of normal; sodium, potassium, calcium to be in mid-range of normal; and zinc and manganese to be low.
3. Hair analysis showed high levels of calcium, sodium, copper, zinc, phosporus, and selenium, and low levels of potassium, iron, manganese, chromium, boron, iodine, and lithium. Magnesium and vanadium were right on the mean.

Incidentally, day before yesterday (a holiday for us), he ate bacon and eggs for breakfast and asparagus and lamb for dinner. By nightfall, he was very stressed out and anxious.

So what's up, doc?

Vicki



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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by Robert McFerran on November 13, 1998 at 12:05:48:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by VickiR on November 13, 1998 at 10:54:25:

Hi Vicki,

Thanks for all the information. I don't mean to make you type so much.

Your husbands blood profile certainly looks like a Hunter-gatherer or Mixed metabolic type.

Of course I have my own protocol for the 5 hours glucose tolerance test. The test meal is VERY important (I'm sure that you've read in Philpott's BRAIN ALLERGIES where a food allergen (say potato) can cause a precipitious increase in blood sugar.

So the test meal of milk and cereal (two common food allergens) is not a good one. Unfortunately if you go to a docs office for the test they give you a corn syrup drink -- another major food allergen!

I still have to shake my head when ANY type of practicioner takes a fasting blood sugar alone and proclaims that someone does or doesn't have hypoglycemia.
The test meal I like to use is one orange, one banana and five pitted dates mixed in a blender to a milkshake-like consistency.

Of course what he really needs to do first is run the elimination diet to rid himself of food allergens that might be triggering his symptoms. Once clear of those he will be able to get a VERY DEFINATE read on which metabolic subset he falls by gauging the energy (or lack thereof) that each diet delivers.

Your husband is no doubt a complex case. I'm just glad that he doesn't have a menstrual cycle and the phenomenon of metabolic 'cycling' adding to the complexity. :)

Bob


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Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran)

Posted by VickiR on November 16, 1998 at 14:19:24:

In Reply to: Re: Hunter-Gatherer Diet (attn. Bob McFerran) posted by Robert McFerran on November 13, 1998 at 12:05:48:

Hi, Bob
You may be right about the allergen. We had previously determined via an elimination diet that milk was not an allergen but wheat was. We later decided that gluten was the real culprit and eliminated all gluten-containing grains from his diet...but that was after the times when we did the blood sugar tests. At that time, we would have added homemade granola containing oats, barley and rye flakes to his cereal (even though the cereal itself would have been either corn flakes or rice krispies).
I guess the only way we'll know for sure now is to repeat the test :(
Vicki




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