Metabolic Type and ER4YT Diets archives

Elimination Diet--Fishy question

Posted by Jen on February 17, 1999 at 08:12:12:

I'm interested in doing the e-diet. Pretty certain I'm toward the extreme end of the HG range. My question: where do you get all the required fish for the week-or-so of this e-diet? My big supermarket sells canned mackerel and salmon, frozen salmon occasionally, but no frozen mackerel or trout. The "fresh" fish usually includes salmon, sometimes trout, never mackerel. Here in the upper midwest, much of what is sold as "fresh" looks anything but (it's delivered once a week) and I'm not about to eat decomposing trout. The small health-food stores (we don't have the big chainstores)don't carry fish at all. What's the answer?


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Re: Elimination Diet--Fishy question

Posted by trish on February 17, 1999 at 09:46:59:

In Reply to: Elimination Diet--Fishy question posted by Jen on February 17, 1999 at 08:12:12:

Hi Jen,

Where exactly are you in the upper midwest? I live in the Chicago area (western suburbs) and had no problem with finding the fish. Have you asked at the supermarket whether or not they can order the fish for you? Bob was surprised that I found fresh (and I mean fresh - it was practically looking back at me) mackeral, but I had to ask about it - the fish market where I went didn't keep it in the front. I had one market (Whole Foods) order some for me, too. They are farther away, but they have better hours... They ordered 5 lbs and wrapped it in 1 lb packages for me. But again, I had to ask about it - they don't usually carry it.

Good luck
trish


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Re: Elimination Diet--Fishy question

Posted by Susan Mierswa on February 17, 1999 at 11:05:45:

In Reply to: Re: Elimination Diet--Fishy question posted by trish on February 17, 1999 at 09:46:59:

Trish,

How did you cook that fresh mackerel on the e-diet? I am curious.

Susan


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Re: Elimination Diet--Fishy question

Posted by trish on February 17, 1999 at 11:45:02:

In Reply to: Re: Elimination Diet--Fishy question posted by Susan Mierswa on February 17, 1999 at 11:05:45:

Hi Susan,

I just threw it in the oven and baked it in a casserole dish uncovered. There's not much you can do on this diet without oil or butter or any herbs or spices. I have either broiled or baked everything, except the soup of course! The red meat trout and mackerel are the oiliest fish and so you can get a bit of browning of the skin if you broil them. That's a real treat.

This morning I wrapped cod in aluminum foil with celery tops and baked it that way - hopefully it won't suck. :-)

I'm not used to cooking fish at home, and so I've over cooked it a few times and it came out dry (that's another advantage of the oily fish, it doesn't dry out so easily). The house smells, too!

Ah well, it's temporary and I hope it will be worth it in the end!

be well,
trish



Re: Elimination Diet--Fishy question

Posted by Robert McFerran on February 17, 1999 at 12:58:08:

In Reply to: Elimination Diet--Fishy question posted by Jen on February 17, 1999 at 08:12:12:

Jen,

Please note that salmon is not on the elimination diet.

The answer to your question is cod (or scrod).

I live way inland here in Louisville and I understand your plight. Fortunately I've never had problems getting fresh or frozen cod (that hasn't been adulturated).

Stay away from the canned stuff at all costs.

If you can't find the cod you can instead go with any fresh or frozen white fish. Just read the labels on the frozen stuff carefully.

Good luck!

Bob


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Thanks, Bob and Trish! (NMI)

Posted by Jen on February 17, 1999 at 14:38:36:

In Reply to: Re: Elimination Diet--Fishy question posted by Robert McFerran on February 17, 1999 at 12:58:08:





Re: Elimination Diet--Fishy question

Posted by Lincoln on February 18, 1999 at 15:15:23:

In Reply to: Elimination Diet--Fishy question posted by Jen on February 17, 1999 at 08:12:12:

I eat, and enjoy, a lot of fish. But I can't stand mackerel - yechh. Dark, oily, strong tasting flesh. I know many peopl who fish a lot and therefore eat a lot of fish - without exception mackerel is the LAST fish they'd want to eat. I'd stick with frozen salmon and trout - stay away from the canned stuff if it has oil added to it.


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But, Lincoln, Salmon is NOT on the eliminaiton diet menu!!!

Posted by trish on February 18, 1999 at 16:05:38:

In Reply to: Re: Elimination Diet--Fishy question posted by Lincoln on February 18, 1999 at 15:15:23:

Besides, the mackerel was not bad at all - I guess I really like fish!

be well,
trish


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Re: Salmon is NOT on the eliminatiton diet menu - why not?

Posted by Lincoln on February 18, 1999 at 16:18:10:

In Reply to: But, Lincoln, Salmon is NOT on the eliminaiton diet menu!!! posted by trish on February 18, 1999 at 16:05:38:

Okay - I saw that after I posted the reply.

But why is that? Salmon and trout are VERY similar, both as a species and as a food. Salmon, trout, and mackerel are often mentioned together as foods that are high in essential fatty acids. So what's the beef with salmon?


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We'll have to ask BOB MCFERRAN about this :-)

Posted by trish on February 18, 1999 at 17:11:10:

In Reply to: Re: Salmon is NOT on the eliminatiton diet menu - why not? posted by Lincoln on February 18, 1999 at 16:18:10:

I know that according to the bloodtype diets, salmon has a lectin that's bad for type Bs. Perhaps there's more to salmon chemically than meets the eye? The elimination diet foods are chosen because they are the LEAST likely to cause allergic reactions in most people (from my understanding). For whatever reason, salmon doesn't fall into that category. Bob will probably have a more complete answer...lets see!

BTW, my brother has a friend named Lincoln - great name!

take care,
trish



Re: Salmon is NOT on the eliminatiton diet menu - why not?

Posted by Robert McFerran on February 18, 1999 at 17:13:18:

In Reply to: Re: Salmon is NOT on the eliminatiton diet menu - why not? posted by Lincoln on February 18, 1999 at 16:18:10:

Hi Lincoln,

Many folks will have a sensitivity to salmon -- perhaps due to some lectin reactions that aren't seen in mackerel and trout. You might want to ask Dr. D'Adamo about the specifics of salmon.

The reason why salmon is not on the list of safe foods used in the elimination diet phase is primarily experiential. As I mentioned before Dr. Mansfield honed this list based on his experience of passing 10,000 patients through various elimination diets.

You bring up an interesting point with the concept of food groups and cross-reactivity that is heavily embraced by Environmental physicians. While I have seen that some parallels can be drawn -- others cannot. An example is broccoli and cauliflower. Folks would expect that they would be very similar but in reality they have a much different allergenic and metabolic profile.

Bob


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Re: Salmon is NOT on the eliminatiton diet menu - why not?

Posted by Lincoln on February 18, 1999 at 17:28:25:

In Reply to: Re: Salmon is NOT on the eliminatiton diet menu - why not? posted by Robert McFerran on February 18, 1999 at 17:13:18:

>Many folks will have a sensitivity to salmon ... The reason why salmon is not on the list of safe foods used in the elimination diet phase is primarily experiential. <

Okay.

But I still hate mackerel. Even my cats won't eat it. It makes good catfish bait, though, if you let leave it out in the sun for a couple days to stiffen up and get ripe. That high, high fat content what turns the trick!


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Re: Salmon is NOT on the eliminatiton diet menu - why not?

Posted by Robert McFerran on February 18, 1999 at 22:35:23:

In Reply to: Re: Salmon is NOT on the eliminatiton diet menu - why not? posted by Lincoln on February 18, 1999 at 17:28:25:

Lincoln,

Personally I ate cod fillets throughout my elimination diet. About 1 1/2 pounds per day.

Bob



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