Metabolic Type and ER4YT Diets archives

another food allergy question

Posted by Denise on February 20, 1999 at 23:39:16:

Hi there, Dr. Stoll and Mr. McFerran.

My question is, would I crave foods with yeast if I am allergic to it? I did the elimination diet a couple of weeks ago, and found out I'm allergic to citrus fruits and eggs. I ate a spoonful of sugar and became depressed, lethargic and irritable, then had terrible cravings. Needless to say I'm not touching that again anytime soon. I tested wheat by making chapatis (whole wheat flour, water, salt): no problems. This week I bought whole wheat bread: same ingredients as the chapatis with the addition of yeast. It took a few days, but now my cravings for bread are out of control and I've gained weight back that I lost during the elimination diet. Actually, as far back as I can remember I've eaten yeast-leavened bread as if it were candy. I don't crave the chapatis nor the manna bread.

So I guess now I have to go through another withdrawal. But why would yeast allergy cause cravings? Or is that really what it is?

Thanks for all your help, Denise


Follow Ups:


Re: another food allergy question

Posted by Robert McFerran on February 21, 1999 at 04:15:17:

In Reply to: another food allergy question posted by Denise on February 20, 1999 at 23:39:16:

Denise,

Unlike Dr. Stoll I find that MANY folks have a sensitivity to yeast -- one reason why I have them test bakers and brewers yeast separately as they would a food. I'm not sure whether there is a cross-reactivity with candida albicans, whether we haven't had time to adapt to these very new food additives, or whether we become sensitized to it through almost constant consumption in our modern diets. Of course it could be all of the above.

It might also be a different phenomenon that I'll be discussing in my book where the food (in this case wheat) actually damages the intestinal lining and in effect causes more of it's contents to leak into the bloodstream. Here is the excerpt:

The three different metabolic diets will be introduced in the next chapters. Foods are grouped into three general categories.

CORE FOODS will be your best foods. Time has made us well adapted to these foods. They have proven themselves to have a low allergenic potential and can be eaten several times a week. They should serve as the bulk (greater than 70%) of your nutritional needs. These should be the first foods you test upon completion of the Elimination Diet phase.

SUPPLEMENTAL FOODS are important since they give nutritional variety to your diet. While these foods tend to work well with your inherited metabolism they also have a higher potential for developing food allergies. Therefore these foods should be regularly enjoyed but not overeaten. You will probably find your best balance if you eat them no more than once a week. These foods should be closely checked for negative reactions after testing your core foods.

AVOID FOODS are those that are metabolically inappropriate for your physiology. While they should generally be avoided they can often be tolerated in small quantities when eaten in conjunction with your Core/Supplemental foods. AVOID FOODS also tend to be best tolerated when eaten with your evening meal. This group of foods are the last that should be tested following the elimination diet as many will generate symptoms.

ELIMINATE FOODS must be completely removed from your diet. People with arthritis tend to be very poorly adapted to these ‘new’ foods. These foods all have a high allergenic potential. Many (especially grains and milk products) can directly damage and increase permeability of the intestinal lining. This intestinal damage also limits the absorption of important vitamins and minerals. Celiac disease is the most obvious example of this phenomenon.

Celiac disease is associated with a specific intolerance to a certain protein (gluten) found in grains. Common symptoms include abdominal bloating, diarrhea, muscle wasting, extreme fatigue, iron and other nutrient deficiencies and in some cases arthritis. Despite intensive study, the mechanisms involved in celiac disease have not been determined. At first it was hypothesized that individuals suffering from celiac simply lacked a digestive enzyme needed to break down gluten. We now know that the mechanisms are far more complex. A new theory suggests that lectins are responsible for at least some of the intestinal damage. Lectins are molecules found in some foods that can have a variety of toxic effects on living tissues. Current research suggests that wheat germ lectin may be the culprit responsible for scarring of tissues along the intestinal tract.

Until recently celiac disease was thought to only effect 1 out of 300 people in the general population. Today’s research shows that there are more undiagnosed than diagnosed cases. The problem is that many of these undiagnosed cases are latent, and do not show the prominent symptoms of more severe disease. Celiac disease exhibits a significantly higher prevalence among patients with autoimmune disease, diabetes, mental/neurological disorders, intestinal cancers and lymphoma. It is becoming obvious that celiac disease is only the tip of the iceberg, representing a very small part of a much larger group of individuals with grain allergy.

We are finding ourselves in a similar situation with milk and milk products. Lactose intolerance is a condition resulting from the inability to digest lactose (milk sugar). The problem is primarily due to a deficiency of the enzyme lactase. Common symptoms of lactose intolerance include bloating, intestinal gas, nausea, diarrhea and cramps. Milk has been shown to damage intestinal cells in a manner similar to celiac disease in many individuals. Likewise, lactose intolerance is only a fragment of a larger population of people with milk allergy.

Celiac disease and lactose intolerance stem simply from being poorly adapted to a food. While we’re not completely sure of the mechanisms at play we do know that the consequences can be quite dire leading to a variety of chronic disease states. How well we will be adapted to any food is based on how many thousands of years that our ancestors ate it. In the case of grains and milk that time has been too short for our physiology to fully adjust.

For best results you should leave grains, milk and milk products out of your diet. You are STRONGLY advised to omit any of the grains or milk that have adverse effects on your specific blood type (see below). ELIMINATE MEANS ELIMINATE! Simply reducing your intake of these foods will do you little good. A single teaspoon of wheat is capable of doing extensive damage to the intestinal tract of celiac patients. This is another reason why a diet composed exclusively of whole foods is a must. Trace amounts of milk and grain (or their excipients) are found in almost all processed foods. If you insist on trying these foods you will need to use a different testing methodology to measure their impact on your arthritis symptoms.

Most foods will deliver an immediate reaction (within 1-4 hours) after ingestion. ELIMINATE FOODS can deliver a delayed reaction as much as four days after eating. The phenomenon of delayed sensitivity is probably due to damage done by that food to the intestinal lining. Let’s use wheat as an example of how to test an ELIMINATE FOOD.

If you intend to test wheat you should eat wheat (shredded wheat cereal is a relatively pure form of wheat) three times a day with your other known ‘safe’ foods for 4 consecutive days. During this period you will not be able to test any other foods. Closely compare your symptoms prior to and after the addition of wheat to your diet. Of course if you experience an immediate reaction to an ELIMINATE FOOD you should consider it a food allergen remove it from your diet.

Denise, what is your blood type? What metabolic subset did you fall under?

Bob



Follow Ups:


Re: another food allergy question (misunderstanding)

Posted by Walt Stoll on February 21, 1999 at 11:46:16:

In Reply to: Re: another food allergy question posted by Robert McFerran on February 21, 1999 at 04:15:17:

Hi, Bob.

Just to clear up another misunderstanding between us (one of very few): I never said that many people did not have sensitivity to yeasts or fungi.

What I DID say is that there is very little cross sensitivity between sensitivity to candida and other yeasts.

THEREFORE, eliminating all yeasts & fungi while treating candida is not indicated.

Namaste` Walt



Re: another food allergy question

Posted by LuAnn Curran on February 21, 1999 at 13:02:26:

In Reply to: Re: another food allergy question posted by Robert McFerran on February 21, 1999 at 04:15:17:

Hi Denise,
I know what you're going through. I eliminated all "yeast breads", followed the "Yeast Connection Diet" and did real well. However after a few months of feeling great, I decided to try this and that and fell into the trap. I found out when I ate anything containing yeast, it usually always contained some form of sugar, not always visible in usual wording on ingredient label, then would start having the cravings you speak of. Found it best to just eat wheat free, yeast free breads when I really felt a need for bread. I use spelt, millet, and Flax/Sunflower seed bread seem to be best for me. Good luck, it is a constant battle to keep our immune system built up and a lifelong way of living! Take care!


Follow Ups:


Bob. How about gluten-free grains?

Posted by Pete R on February 22, 1999 at 13:18:59:

In Reply to: Re: another food allergy question posted by Robert McFerran on February 21, 1999 at 04:15:17:

Hello Bob. The ER4YT guidelines allows type O people to use Spelt Bread, Ezekiel, and other breads that do not contain wheat gluten. Does this agree with your analysis?
(It sure hope so)
Thanks for your time.
Pete Reinhard


Follow Ups:


Re: another food allergy question: response to Bob's questions

Posted by Denise on February 22, 1999 at 14:06:25:

In Reply to: Re: another food allergy question posted by Robert McFerran on February 21, 1999 at 04:15:17:

Bob,

Thank you for the information. I'm type AB. I know that means I'm supposed to avoid kidney and lima beans, seeds, corn, buckwheat, wheat, tomato. I noticed that every blood type is told to avoid wheat. Anyway, by default I won't be eating it anymore, because if I'm not eating yeast-leavened bread, I have no reason to eat wheat. (I'll confess that I like to experiment; so you can tell me what to avoid but I gotta try it anyway and see what happens...)

I appear to be agriculturalist, but not extreme. I can go all day without food when I have to, but I prefer to eat several small, low-purine meals. I cannot tolerate coffee or regular tea at any time of the day. My evening meals usually have legumes in them. During the elimination diet, although I lost my appetite on a few occasions, I felt I was STARVING without grains.

I haven't done bloodwork in at least 10 years, mainly because I don't have a family physician. So I don't have anything "scientific" to back me up. All I know is, since I stopped eating sugar, my allergies, moods, and sleeping are all much, much better. At this point I just want to conquer those cravings.

Thanks for all your help. Words cannot express how happy I feel to finally take control of my health so that I can actually LIVE life.

Denise



Thanks!

Posted by Denise on February 22, 1999 at 14:11:18:

In Reply to: Re: another food allergy question posted by LuAnn Curran on February 21, 1999 at 13:02:26:

Thanks for your support, LuAnn. It's amazing how some foods just wreck havoc with our systems, and we seem to love them so much.

Denise



Re: Bob. How about gluten-free grains?

Posted by Robert McFerran on February 22, 1999 at 22:30:21:

In Reply to: Bob. How about gluten-free grains? posted by Pete R on February 22, 1999 at 13:18:59:

Pete,

Recent research in celiac disease shows that omitting gluten containing grains solves the major part of the problem -- but unfortunately not all of it.

Now it is being observed that other grains and grain alternatives without gluten damage the intestinal tract of celiac patients. Buckwheat is a notable exception, perhaps because it is not a member of the grain family.

In my book I will be suggesting that severe cases of arthritis avoid all grain and grain alternatives. If you want to test them for a reaction I ask that they be eaten three times a day for 4 consecutive days to see if they increase intestinal permeability and with it symptoms severity.

Bob



Spelt and Ezekiel are NOT gluten free

Posted by Jen on February 23, 1999 at 08:07:50:

In Reply to: Bob. How about gluten-free grains? posted by Pete R on February 22, 1999 at 13:18:59:

Pete, it's my understanding that the ER4YT diet allows those foods because they don't have the offending wheat LECTINS. (Sprouting destroys the lectin.) However, they do have gluten and should be avoided by the gluten-sensitive. Comments from Bob or anyone else?


Follow Ups:


But do they NOT promote weight gain in type "O"

Posted by Pete R on February 23, 1999 at 09:48:35:

In Reply to: Spelt and Ezekiel are NOT gluten free posted by Jen on February 23, 1999 at 08:07:50:

Thanks to both of you for the reply, and thanks for the clarification.

I was asking about Spelt and Ezekiel in terms of weight loss for a type-O person. I believe that normal wheat and corn are very bad for the O metabolically, but these other grains are not, and I thought it had to due with gluten.

If you were a type-O who wanted to loose weight, would you use these grains?

Thaks for any advice. PR


Follow Ups:


Re: But do they NOT promote weight gain in type "O"

Posted by Jen on February 23, 1999 at 11:34:52:

In Reply to: But do they NOT promote weight gain in type "O" posted by Pete R on February 23, 1999 at 09:48:35:

Hi Pete, I AM a type O, following the ER4YT diet pretty closely. My experience is that when I eat grain-based carbs I crave more and more. I was packing away a lot of Ezekiel bread (it's so tasty) on the excuse it was "highly beneficial" but actually, Dr. D recommends fairly small weekly amounts--not all-U-can-eat! I live in the dank upper midwest and have a noticeable SAD thing too, and crave more of the comfort foods (STARCH!) during the tail end of the long winter. For me, what keeps my mood/energy up and weight down is lots of beef and salmon and assorted veggies (some raw, some cooked with butter or olive oil), small, occasional servings of brown rice or buckwheat kasha, and a little fruit. Ezekiel bread is kept in the freezer and I have a toasted piece once in a while, with fruit spread, for a treat. The other key to the weight thing, for O's is to keep moving! When bored, tired, anxious, instead of bagging out in front of the TV with a snack, walk, bounce on a mini-tramp, put on music and boogie around the house. Notice how good you feel, and keep going for THAT feeling, over and over, day by day. Best wishes!


Follow Ups:


Re: But do they NOT promote weight gain in type "O"

Posted by Robert McFerran on February 23, 1999 at 12:36:07:

In Reply to: Re: But do they NOT promote weight gain in type "O" posted by Jen on February 23, 1999 at 11:34:52:

Pete and Jen,

Jen, you are right. There IS gluten in spelt and Ezekiel bread.

Pete, you are right. There is no wheat germ agglutinin in spelt and Ezekiel bread.

I have to look at this thing in 'reductionist' terms (gluten, gliadin, wheat germ agglutin, etc.) but I always have the underlying intuititive sense that whether or not someone can eat grain is tied to how long their ancestors ate grains. In other words it's a matter of adaptation.

The other thing that I've noticed (like Jen) is the fact that once someone believes that grains and especially bread are o.k. for them they will tend to over-eat them and exclude other vegetables that are superior from a nutritonal and adaptation standpoint.

I like the way Dr. D'Adamo 'brackets' dietary restriction with the level of illness that you are facing.

I have consistently seen that folks that eliminate ALL grains get faster results than those that don't. I have also seen that folks can often 'liberalize' once they have achieved the desired level of health.

Bob



Re: But do they NOT promote weight gain in type "O"

Posted by becky on February 23, 1999 at 20:59:33:

In Reply to: Re: But do they NOT promote weight gain in type "O" posted by Jen on February 23, 1999 at 11:34:52:

I'm type A and I have the same problem. I eat grains and
I want more carbs and I gain weight. Its a cycle. I have
learned to limit my grains to just a little amaranth once
in awhile. I do best with just the turkey, chicken, and
veggies and fruit, and once in awhile tofu.



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