Metabolic Type and ER4YT Diets archives

?? For Bob McFerran- Manna Bread Update

Posted by Thomas Seay on August 25, 1998 at 18:24:39:

I had an email conversation with the Quality Assurance person in charge of Manna Breads, the sprouted bread that I eat most frequently. She told me that they << cook the product above 200F and below 400F the temperature
will vary with your oven.>>

When asked if thatdid not destroy the beneficial enzymes,
she responded, <therefore manna bread is not recommended for those on a raw food diet.>>

She cited the reason for baking at such high temperatures was due to public health considerations. To her credit, she was very truthful with me.

My question is what, then, are the benefits of eating this bread as opposed to regualr whole wheat bread?

-Thomas


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Some Of Above Post Cut off

Posted by Thomas Seay on August 25, 1998 at 18:28:52:

In Reply to: ?? For Bob McFerran- Manna Bread Update posted by Thomas Seay on August 25, 1998 at 18:24:39:

When asked about the enzymes at that temperature, she responded as follows:

""You are correct, many enzymes would be inactivated that temperature and
therefore manna bread is not recommended for those on a raw food diet.
The process of baking is essentially dehydration (as is freezing, frying
and cooking). As with all processes in food there is a time temperature
relationship that has to be considered when looking at these types of
issues. The main problem that any food manufacturer has to weigh our
when produce food for the mass public is food safety verses other food
parameters. Unfortunately food safety will always win out. The
potential of mass incidence of food borne illness is two great to not
set this parameter above all others. I realize that many our prefer
that foods are minimally processed, I agree with them, but we have to
make sure the consumer health and welfare are taken into consideration
above all other matters. The example of the problem that occurred with
the unpasteurized juice in Washington State (Addiwallia spelling is most
likely wrong) is an excellent example of potential problems that can
arise in food manufacturing.

Having said the above the bread are an excellent source of fiber,
contain no preservative, no added fat or sugar, free of yeast & salt and
are overall an great tasting product. ""




more bread questions

Posted by Pam on August 25, 1998 at 19:05:52:

In Reply to: ?? For Bob McFerran- Manna Bread Update posted by Thomas Seay on August 25, 1998 at 18:24:39:

Thomas,

thanks for this information. I am just beginning to introduce grains as part of the agriculturist diet and had some related questions.

Bob,

The agri-diet recommends Essene bread and rice cakes. After checking several of my usual whole foods markets, I have been unable to find it. There are several others like Manna bread, Ezekial bread, Artisan bread that are whole or sprouted grain and yeast- and sugar-free. I'm trying to determine if one of these others will be an adequate replacement for Essene. Can you tell me what qualities I should be looking for in a similar bread?

Pam


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Re: more bread questions and more...

Posted by Linda Hynds on August 25, 1998 at 21:33:32:

In Reply to: more bread questions posted by Pam on August 25, 1998 at 19:05:52:


Hi Robert Thomas and Pam,

I also have many questions about this bread issue. I cannot find Essene bread either. However, Ezekial bread is plentiful in this area. I have added oatmeal with no problem and intend to try rice tomorrow. I am not aware of some of the other breads Pam mentioned. Thomas, I REALLY appreciate all the research you are willing to do for all of us.

Namaste` Linda (Hynds)




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Re: Essene bread

Posted by Gail on August 25, 1998 at 22:35:44:

In Reply to: Re: more bread questions and more... posted by Linda Hynds on August 25, 1998 at 21:33:32:

When I was first looking for Essene bread and could not locate it, my local health food store indicated that Manna bread was the same thing.

Millet bread is also very delicious and made by Food for Life. I've never heard anyone mention it, but millet is an alkaline grain and one of the most nutritional. I've found the texture of this bread to work better for sandwiches than the others. It is moist, but not doughy, and looks similar to cornbread

Gail



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Re: bu hr For Bob McFerran- Manna Bread Update

Posted by Robert McFerran on August 25, 1998 at 22:36:43:

In Reply to: ?? For Bob McFerran- Manna Bread Update posted by Thomas Seay on August 25, 1998 at 18:24:39:

Thomas,

I don't eat either of them since I have a food sensitivity to wheat. I can't split hairs about which would be better since I feel that there are LOTS of others foods that would be better than any type of bread. Let's face it, we eat bread because it's convenient.

I constantly see folks attempting to eat the way they did in the past by SUBSTITUTING new products like sprouted bread for the old whole wheat bread. People who are sensitive to milk often go to a rice or soy milk alternative which MIGHT be o.k. if they made it themselves. The stuff you buy in the cartons at the health food stores is anything but healthy.

That's one of the things that you learn as you go through the process of the elimination diet -- that breakfast doesn't have to be milk and cereal or butter and toast. In fact the best 'alternative' milk and whole grain cereal is a distant second to other foods that you could/should be eating.

So, give up trying to find the 'perfect' bread. It doesn't exist. I really don't have an opinion on which one would be less bad for you......

Bob





Re: more bread questions

Posted by Robert McFerran on August 25, 1998 at 22:52:39:

In Reply to: more bread questions posted by Pam on August 25, 1998 at 19:05:52:

Pam,

See my reply to Thomas.

Bread is a COMPLEX mixture of many things. It has some sort of grain or grain like component that must also have some type of 'glue'. Glutin is a protein component that is the glue that holds many breads together. Then there is yeast to make it rise. Other things are in there too -- just read the label on the package and you'll see that there is much more than just grain.

Thomas pointed out that most breads also must be processed by baking which is one more processing step.

Test your grains in their pure form (NOT VIA BREAD) and then test the pure forms of brewers and bakers yeast. You'll find that you'll probably have reactions to some of them and not to others. Once you know this you can go into a health food store armed with information to make a smart purchasing decision on the bread that's LEAST likely to create a problem.

Bob



Re: more bread questions and more...

Posted by Susan on August 25, 1998 at 23:36:31:

In Reply to: Re: more bread questions and more... posted by Linda Hynds on August 25, 1998 at 21:33:32:


Essene bread is a flat bread ( no yeast ) and looks like crackers so maybe they would be in the cracker section of your health food store.



Re: bu hr For Bob McFerran- Manna Bread Update

Posted by Walt Stoll on August 26, 1998 at 11:31:40:

In Reply to: ?? For Bob McFerran- Manna Bread Update posted by Thomas Seay on August 25, 1998 at 18:24:39:

Dear Thomas,

You got me.

Thanks for the research. This is the first that I knew how this stuff was made.

Walt




Re: Essene bread

Posted by Thomas Seay on August 26, 1998 at 13:33:05:

In Reply to: Re: Essene bread posted by Gail on August 25, 1998 at 22:35:44:

Yes, Essene, manna and Ezekiel breads are all sprouted breads made by different companies. I believe that the millet bread to which you refer is sproted as well, but I believe (correct me if I am wrong) that it contains sprouted .wheat as well. When I was in France this past Winter, I noticed they had sprouted spelt bread in the Health Food Stores...I think that I am going to write these companies and suggest that they start making such a bread...It seems like that would be profitable seeing as there are so many problems with wheat.

-Thomas


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Re: Millet bread

Posted by Gail on August 26, 1998 at 15:15:01:

In Reply to: Re: Essene bread posted by Thomas Seay on August 26, 1998 at 13:33:05:

Thomas,

This millet bread is Wheat FREE. Contains : brown rice flour, millet flour, tapioca flour, rye flour, +( pinapple, peach and pear juices). The 800# on the bag is1-800-797-5090. Says it is made especially for those who can not tolerate wheat or gluten.

Sprouted spelt sounds like it would be good. I just bought a bread maker but may wait till I'm experienced at it before trying to make sprouted breads. I did print out the instructions from the ER4YT board though.

Thanks for all your info.

Gail



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Re: Essene bread

Posted by Walt Stoll on August 27, 1998 at 10:26:15:

In Reply to: Re: Essene bread posted by Thomas Seay on August 26, 1998 at 13:33:05:

Dear Thomas,

I am not an expert in THIS but would like to share what I do know.

Sprouting creates a lot of enzymes &, as such, I would suspect that the sprouted bread would be healthier.

However, spelt is of the wheat family. Most people sensitive to wheat will also be sensitive to spelt. There are many books now available that list exchange lists that tell which foodstuffs share common allergens. Anyone trying the elimination/provocation testing should have one of these references available so that they can appropriately do the testing. For example, if something on the same list as wheat is ingested while testing for wheat, the test is totally invalid.

Walt



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Walt: Book titles

Posted by Pam on August 27, 1998 at 12:27:59:

In Reply to: Re: Essene bread posted by Walt Stoll on August 27, 1998 at 10:26:15:

Walt,

As someone who is currently doing elimination/provocation I'm very interested in the lists of shared allergens that you mention. Can you provide one or more specific titles? Thank you.

Pam


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Re: Walt: Book titles

Posted by Walt Stoll on August 28, 1998 at 11:00:34:

In Reply to: Walt: Book titles posted by Pam on August 27, 1998 at 12:27:59:

Dear Pam,

Marshall Mandell, MD, comes to my mind but any Clinical Ecologist discussing diet would be good. MY first stop would be the library & have the reference librarian help me find the section with this stuff.

Let us know what you learn.

Walt




For the Gluten-Intolerant

Posted by Vicki on September 04, 1998 at 11:23:19:

In Reply to: Re: Millet bread posted by Gail on August 26, 1998 at 15:15:01:

For folks who can't tolerate wheat or gluten:
If your intolerance is to wheat only, this millet bread might be okay. If you react to gluten, however, be advised that rye contains gluten (as do barley, oats, spelt, and kamut as well).
If you crave an occasional slice of relatively "normal" bread but can't tolerate gluten, I have a recipe for a fairly decent gluten-free bread that can be made in a breadmaker. I would be happy to post it on the BB if anyone is interested. It does not, of course, qualify as "whole food."




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