Bob McFerran historical posts January 1998

Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 27, 1998 at 12:52:51:

Dear Nancy,

Get into an ongoing communication with Robert McFerran (here on this BB). Use the search feature. I think he has done enough research that he would be better answering your questions about tests than I would at this stage of my career. If you do it on the BB, we all will learn with you.

You are right: Don't neglect the skilled relaxation.

For the same price as the mood altering drugs, you would benefit a lot more doing 3 whole-body, deep, therapeutic massages a week for 2 weeks. This is not a cure but would push you in the right direction pretty quick. Unfortunately, you may have one of the AMA's favorite gimmics (insurance that pays for your drugs but never for massage, Rolfing, etc.).

AWARENESS IS THE FIRST (and most difficult) STEP! Congratulations!

Walt



Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Robert McFerran on January 28, 1998 at 12:12:37:

Nancy,

The WONDERFUL thing about FMS is that a rheumatologist can do a couple thousand dollars of testing and find that there is ABSOLUTELY NOTHING WRONG WITH YOU!

Of course this isn't the case -- you know it, but until now allopathic physicians have been skeptical about those debilitating muscle pains.

I'm going to put my butt on the line here but I've helped some 15 women get over their fibromyalgia within a 6 month period (if they do what they need to do). I've found that FMS is a metabolic problem -- in other words you've probably inherited an EXTREME metabolism and unfortunately you aren't eating in a fashion to match what your physiology is asking for.

13 of those 15 women were eating a diet that was much too low in fat, much too low in purines and much too high in complex carbohydrates. In other words they were eating the way that they thought they should.

Look at you bloodwork and tell me your uric acid level as well as cholesterol level (the HDL/LDL values would be helpful too). I'm sure that your rheum has already done this so just call and get the numbers.

Also let me know if drinking coffee or other caffienated drink makes you feel:

a) Great
b) A little jittery after two cups
c) Makes me feel shakey. If I drink it after dinner it will keep me up all night.

Bob


Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Nancy on January 28, 1998 at 20:28:24:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Robert McFerran on January 28, 1998 at 12:12:37:

Robert,
Thanks for your suggestion. I'll have to call my internist for that info. tomarrow. I have way too many docs.

In answer to your caffeine ?-------I feel well for an hour or two after drinking a glass of tea. I have given up coffee (boo hoo) and sometimes I drink some green tea or herbal tea (which I hate) for breakfast. I don't notice anything from the green tea except warmth. I'll get back to you.




Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Nancy on January 28, 1998 at 20:36:33:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Walt Stoll on January 27, 1998 at 12:52:51:

Walt,

Yes, indeed, you are so right about the AMA insurance gimmick. I can get the Prozac for $5 for a month's supply. I've never been to a massage therapist and probably won't ever go to one because of the money. I do, however, go to a PT who does wonderful whole body massages (except abdominal), including reflexology. When I get paid, I'll make an appointment. Of course, I haven't reached deductible yet, but at least it will go toward my deductible.

Robert has already shared some of his wisdom with me and, as you can see, we are in touch on the BB. I'll be in touch with him.

Thanks alot. Nancy



Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Robert McFerran on January 29, 1998 at 00:01:56:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Nancy on January 28, 1998 at 20:28:24:

Nancy,

I want to know how the coffee made you feel back when you used to drink it. Also why did you stop? I assume the boo-hoo was due to the fact that you had to give up something you liked -- why did you like it?

I'm looking forward to those bloodwork values to see if a metabolic 'signature' emerges for you......


Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Nancy on January 29, 1998 at 16:40:58:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Robert McFerran on January 29, 1998 at 00:01:56:

Robert

For most of my adult life I've had a cup of coffee after breakfast, but I was never a big coffee drinker. Cold cereal, water, and coffee (1/2 reg.,1/2 decaf for last 10 years). I liked it because it tasted good, and it got my digestion going. I can't say that it woke me up--maybe a little, but my hot shower first thing in the am was what woke me up. I had to have a bit of 1/2 & 1/2 or canned milk in it. no sugar, although I can't stand tea without sugar.

I now eat plain oatmeal with brown rice syrup or an egg with bacon. Was eating whole wheat or rye bread with that, but have backed off wheat for a few weeks.

I quit this last time because I switched to green tea after reading Dr. Weill's book and because coffee often makes my stomach churn and burn, which later gets into my colon and cramps, etc. When on vacation, I still enjoy my coffee and once in awhile when eating dinner out, I'll have a decaf. Strangely enough, the symptoms almost never occur at those times. I hope this info helps--if not, keep probing.

I got my bloodwork today. My uric acid was 3.1

My cholesterol wa 237, which is just about what it always is. The HDL was 99 and the LDL was 126. The ratio was 1.3. Trigyceride was 60. Glucose--93. Calcium--10.3.

These are some endocrine studies:

TU--29
T4--07.80
T7--2.3
TSH--1.77


There is something called ESR which is 18, with the normal range being 0-15.

My urinalysis has two stars on it: BLOOD: small and BACTERIA: few. Also EPITH says "many".

Vit B-12= 937

I know I gave you more than you asked for, but too much is better than too little, right?

It's awfully nice of you to take the time to analyze this. THANKS!!!
Nancy


Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Robert McFerran on January 29, 1998 at 18:11:08:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Nancy on January 29, 1998 at 16:40:58:

Nancy,

Are the uric acid levels and HDL and LDL values in mg/dl? If so you've got some very high HDL levels!

No expertise and no comment on the endocrine studies. Perhaps Dr. Stoll will add his expertise if he sees anything.

When DO you get your symptoms and do they exacerbate at certain times? Are they in any way related to the different phases of your menstrual cycle?

Bob


Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Nancy on January 31, 1998 at 12:34:42:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Robert McFerran on January 29, 1998 at 18:11:08:

My rheum did a bone desity test on me because I told him I wanted to gradually wean myself off my estrogen patches. The picture was not good. Although I'm not below the line that indicates danger, I'm pretty close to the line. He's also checking my blood for calcium, since I've been off all supplements and milk products for 2-3 months since my naturopath took me off them. He did that because my hair analysis test indicated that I was off the scale in calcium and magnesium. He says my calcium is going to my joints and hair, rather than my bones where it belongs. Of course, the rheum says the hair analysis test is fraudulent. I don't know who to believe. I surely don't want to be breaking all my bones by my 70th birthday.

Nancy



Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Robert McFerran on February 01, 1998 at 13:35:55:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Nancy on January 31, 1998 at 12:34:42:

Nancy,

Your metabolic type DEMANDS supplementation with calcium and phosphorous (and not magnesium and potassium) in the form of calcium hydroxyapetite since your recent ancestors (the ones that you inherited your metabolism from) primarily ate animals and routinely used crushed bone and bone marrow in their stews.

However supplementation is not enough -- if you aren't eating in a fashion that matches your inherited metabolic type it won't work. pH differences will inactivate several catalysts and ultimately lead to poor assimilation of ALL nutrients.

Bob


Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Nancy on February 01, 1998 at 14:48:50:

Robert,

Thanks! You definitely have my attention. I have started practicing skilled relaxation now that I have the workbook. So far, so good. I did have a glucose tolerance test a year or so ago. My internist said it was normal, but I recall that my chiropractor said that cetain parts of it were low, indicating that I needed to get on a high protein, low carb diet. That's when I started on a Zone type diet, which helped alot with the fatigue. Would it be of any use for you to see that glucose test? I can get it if you want.

I have a couple of questions. What is uric acid? What is purine? When you say "anti-fungals", are you referring to nystatin or nyzoral? If so, don't I need a script for them? I will have to call our local pharmacy which makes compounds to see who in town will prescibe that. Somehow, I don't think my conventional drs will do it, but maybe?

Could you please explain the elimination diet to me? I have been very close to calling my gastro. for a round of Flagyl, after a very horrible weekend. In the past, that drug has gotten me straightened out. I did start taking some left-over Asacol because I am that desperate! I would much rather go the natural route and get to the bottom of the problem, rather that putting yet another band-aid on the situation, if possible. I've had these episodes for over 25 years and they are very stressful in and of themselves. I am very happy to be off all meds for FMS, and would like to make that permanent. I certainly don't want to get into medicating the IBS if I can help it. Thanks!



Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Nancy on February 01, 1998 at 15:04:45:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Robert McFerran on February 01, 1998 at 13:35:55:

Robert

Is there a calcium hydroxyapetite that can be purchased in the drug store, like Citrical? In your opinion, is the hair analysis test worthless? What do you think of the new "designer estrogen" and Fosamax?

Nancy



Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Robert McFerran on February 01, 1998 at 21:50:15:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Nancy on February 01, 1998 at 15:04:45:

Nancy,

The hair test isn't worthless but unless your doc understands metabolic types his analysis of the results will be -- or worse.

Calcium Hydroxyapetite is created from the bone marrow of sheep -- which is great since that is exactly what our ancestors ate. It has trace minerals in exactly the proper ratios which is critical for absorbtion. Once you eat the right diet they will not only be absorbed but UTILIZED.

Solary and Ethical Nutrients are manufacturers of calcium hydroxyapetite that can be found at the health food store. If they don't have it don't let them sell you something else. You can always mail order it.

I don't know about the estrogen and/or the fosmax. I think that if you were eating a diet that matched the metabolic type that you inherited you wouldn't need it.

Bob


Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Robert McFerran on February 01, 1998 at 22:01:11:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Nancy on February 01, 1998 at 14:48:50:

Nancy,

When you are ready for anti-fungals I would suggest Sporanox or Lamisil -- especially if you've had problems with others. You are right -- they are prescription meds and you will have to find someone willing to help you with them, which is one of the major problems that I've seen in helping folks. There are some things at the health food store but most will find them inadequate.

You shouldn't take the antifungals however until you've run the elimination diet and moved over to a 'hunter-gatherer' diet (which will in your case be appropriate for your inherited metabolic type). The diet is very high in proteins and especially purines (a protein found more heavily in dark colored meats, fishes, as well as crustaceans). Relatively high fat is needed with low carbohydrate.

Give me the numbers for you glucose tolerance test. What I consider hypoglycemic is different from what most allopathic docs consider.

The place to start is with the elimination diet. Here is how to run it.

THE ELIMINATION DIET

I’ve often talked with folks that were confident that foods didn’t have any impact on their arthritis symptoms. I ask is if they’ve ever run a good ‘elimination’ diet and a surprising number assure me that they have. Upon further questioning I always find that they have only eliminated a couple of foods, say milk or wheat or nightshade vegetables (tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, etc.). Even though milk and wheat are common food allergens and nightshade vegetables create problems for those possessing one specific metabolism, this should not be considered a true elimination diet.

Over 85% of people with arthritis have food allergies. Most will find not one, but a handful of foods acting as the major culprits. This is the reason why eliminating just one or two random foods is all but useless. If you were allergic to a large number of tree pollens, springtime grasses and weeds the removal of only one of these airborne allergens would usually have little impact on your total allergy symptoms. If the allergen was added back into the mix you probably wouldn’t notice. The effect from this one allergen would be hidden or ‘masked’ by your already prominent symptoms to the other allergens. The same phenomenon occurs with foods.

How could we find whether the airborne allergen in the above example was a significant factor in triggering our allergic symptoms? The best way would be to place ourselves in a room with perfectly filtered air (in essence eliminating all airborne allergens) until our allergy symptoms abated. The specific allergen would then be re-introduced and any allergic reaction noted. In this way the impact of a single, specific allergen can be isolated and tested. What was previously thought to be a rather insignificant allergen would often deliver a surprisingly strong allergic response.

We can do the same thing with foods. Historically ‘spring water fasts’ have been employed. Patients would drink only spring water for the initial 4-5 days. This type of ‘fast’ would obviously eliminate all food allergens from the diet. It was maintained for 4-5 days to also allow physical elimination of all foods eaten prior to the start of the ‘fast’ from the digestive tract.

Spring water fasts have one major problem. A significant percentage of individuals cannot tolerate them and should not try them. Their metabolic demands make any kind of extended water fast dangerous.

Fortunately years of previous testing has provided a list of ‘safe’ foods that can be temporarily substituted for your usual diet. These foods are not completely hypo-allergenic but they do have a low allergenic potential. In other words they are rarely found to induce a reaction. The foods include cod, trout, mackerel, pears, parsnips, turnips, rutabaga, sweet potatoes, yams, celery, zucchini, carrots and peaches. Any foods routinely eaten more than twice a week should be removed from the list. All the foods must be fresh and in their ‘whole’ or natural for


Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Walt Stoll on February 02, 1998 at 11:57:56:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Robert McFerran on February 01, 1998 at 22:01:11:

Thanks, Bob.

As always, great information.

If it were me, though, once I had dealt with the LGS and causes for C-RS susceptibility, Nystatin would be MY drug of choice since it is safer,cheaper and just as effective. Your comments about dealing with causes first are right on.

ALSO, I would like to add my congratulations for Nancy getting started with her skilled relaxation. In the long run it is almost always the most important thing to prevent recurrence of the whole problem. Remember, never within 2 hours of retiring.

Walt



Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Robert McFerran on February 02, 1998 at 13:00:47:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Walt Stoll on February 02, 1998 at 11:57:56:

Walt,

OOPS! Nancy previously wrote me via e-mail to let me know that she had severe herximer reactions with Nystatin and diarrhea with Nizorol.

I have seen many folks with the same reaction. I plan to go into this in more detail in my book but I've found that if folks can't tolerate even a miniscule dose of Nystatin that they should use the Sporanox or Lamisil and introduce the Nystatin later. It seems that they can tolerate it better then. Of course Nystatin is MUCH safer than any other prescription antifungal. It is so safe that it's almost that it still needs a prescription.

In my case I've found that I can't get my insurance company to pay for Nystatin. Apparently there is only one source of supply and they aren't willing to give discounts like the manufacturers of other antifungal medications. They would rather take the risk of poisoning some patients rather than paying a higher cost......

Bob


Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Nancy on February 02, 1998 at 19:27:55:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Robert McFerran on February 01, 1998 at 22:01:11:

Oh, my goodness, Robert, you were right when you said I wouldn't like to hear what the elimination diet was all about! I am going to have to think about this for a few days. In the meantime, I'll get the numbers from my glucose test.

What is going to happen when I take that magnesium citrate? Remember, IBS is my major problem right now. Second is myofascial pain syndrome ( the fibro aches and pains are basically on the back burner as long as I don't eat sweets.)

Lately, I've been eating a combination of green beans, zucchini, yellow squash, carrots, and onions just about every day. Does that mean those vegies are out? That has not been my usual diet until recently, though. I've never eaten a ratabaga or parsnips.

Hopefully, I'll be back on tomarrow with the glucose info.

Nancy



Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Robert McFerran on February 03, 1998 at 13:07:42:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Nancy on February 02, 1998 at 19:27:55:

Nancy,

You don't have to take the citrate -- it just speeds the 'clearing' process.

The foods on that list have proven themselves to have a low allergenic potential. You won't have to eat them forever -- but you will have to eat them EXCLUSIVELY until you clear (usually 5 to six days). I'll let you keep the carrots and zucchinni in but nix to the beans and onion and yellow squash.

Parsnips are good! I really don't care for the rutabaga much.....

Bob



Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Walt Stoll on February 03, 1998 at 15:39:31:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Nancy on February 02, 1998 at 19:27:55:

Dear Nancy,

With IBS, I would not recommend magnesium citrate. Magnesium glycinate, orotate or aspartate would be a much better choice. Later on, when your IBS has been resolved for a year or so, mag citrate might be a cheaper way to go.

Walt



Re: good medical tests to be used as tools

Posted by Nancy on February 04, 1998 at 18:58:19:

In Reply to: Re: good medical tests to be used as tools posted by Robert McFerran on February 03, 1998 at 13:07:42:

Robert

Thanks. I'm going to buy some of both of those vegies and look through Beth's book for some recipes.

I have not been able to get my glucose test results from my internist yet. Hopefully tomarrow.


1998: Jan Feb

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