Bob McFerran historical posts April 1998

Blood type diet?

Posted by Terri on April 10, 1998 at 18:31:52:

HI, I read the "Eat right for your type" book and it sounded really logical. I am still waiting for Dr. Stolls book so I don't know what it says about diet. Anyone have any opinion about it?


Re: Blood type diet?

Posted by Kyra Kitts on April 11, 1998 at 15:19:40:

In Reply to: Blood type diet? posted by Terri on April 10, 1998 at 18:31:52:


Dear Terri,

I was just reading the type A and O parts of D'Adamo's book yesterday and it left me with questions too. I'm blood type A, and fit his dietary recommendations for A's almost exactly. My exercise requirements are clearly what he recommends for type O's, though. Yeah, I love yoga and do it badly and could stand to do more, but if I don't do regular heavy aerobics my stress levels go UP. Which all makes me wonder, since I'm an A product of an O mom and an AB dad, if I didn't also inherit some pronounced O needs. I don't see this aspect of blood subtypes addressed in an otherwise fascinating book. Not that this answers anything, but your post got my interest.

Kyra



Re: Blood type diet?

Posted by Walt Stoll on April 12, 1998 at 12:37:25:

In Reply to: Blood type diet? posted by Terri on April 10, 1998 at 18:31:52:

Dear Terri,

Peter & I are friends. His book contains a lot of truth but is only one piece of what we are learning about how to figure out what any individual should aim for for optimum health. I just hope that when the public realizes that this doesn't work for everyone they don't "throw out the baby with the bathwater" since there are valid concepts in his book.

STILL, the only reliable way we have to figure out whether any particular approach is valid for THAT person is for that person to learn how to do whatever approach they are interested in & DO IT RIGHT. Then they have to listen to their bodymind to see how much good or harm it does.

Our bodyminds area still the best laboratories we have. We just have to learn how to listen to them.

My book promotes learning what a "whole foods diet" is, since it is one of the most common diets that will help most people in a short space of time. One MUST learn how to do it right before trying it or it can make the individual feel worse for weeks--if not done right--and convince that person that it was not good for them when it really meant that it was the best thing they could do.

Walt

Walt


Re: Blood type diet?

Posted by Robert McFerran on April 12, 1998 at 21:11:34:

In Reply to: Re: Blood type diet? posted by Kyra Kitts on April 11, 1998 at 15:19:40:

Kyra,

I just wanted to let you know that a mutual friend of ours (Dr. Stoll) has found that the same low fat, low purine/protein, high complex carbohydrate diet that suits you also suits him best. The problem is that his blood type is O. Dr. D'Adamo would have him eating his way into an early grave with his recommendation of a 'hunter-gatherer' diet that is much higher in meat and fat.

At the same time I have found many folks via Dr. D'Adamo's bulletin board that were suffering immensly from a type A diet. All of them were hypoglycemic -- not just symptoms but actual blood sugar values when given a 5 hour glucose tolerance test. I am happy to report that each and every one of them changed away from what Dr. D was suggesting and ate the 'hunter-gatherer' fare -- just the opposite.

The caffeine test that we spoke of earlier tells the tale of what you should be generally eating. Knowing how to run an elimination diet (to determine food sensitivities) and being cautious about certain lectin containing foods will help you home in on what is best for you.

Bob


Re: Blood type diet?

Posted by Kyra on April 12, 1998 at 23:16:13:

In Reply to: Re: Blood type diet? posted by Robert McFerran on April 12, 1998 at 21:11:34:


Dear Bob,

GREAT to hear from you! And thanks for your usual insightful advice. Hope all's going well with your research and book project!

Kyra



Re: Blood type diet?

Posted by Terri on April 12, 1998 at 23:26:38:

In Reply to: Re: Blood type diet? posted by Walt Stoll on April 12, 1998 at 12:37:25:

Thanks for the comments on the diet. I am struggling to find the right foods for me. Interestingly enough, the book agreed with the findings I had from listening to my body the last few years. But, I seem to have alot of kidney pain, joint pain and headaches. I wonder what part of the diet is bothering me. It sure is challenging.


Re: Caffeine test??

Posted by Jenny on April 13, 1998 at 10:42:14:

In Reply to: Re: Blood type diet? posted by Robert McFerran on April 12, 1998 at 21:11:34:

Hi,
I'm new to this board, and very curious about the caffeine test you mention as a way of determining dietary needs. Would you mind repeating what it is?

By the way, I've been following the ER4YT diet of Dr. D'Adamo and thrilled with the results. I have type O blood, and had been a whole-foods vegetarian for several years, getting weaker and foggier while thinking I was eating all the right things. NOT! Wheat seemed to be the biggest culprit--I improved immediately upon stopping wheat products (I had only been eating whole grains). Adding beef and salmon supplied the kind of protein I seem to need. Exercise is a big component of his plan too.


Re: Caffeine test??

Posted by Robert McFerran on April 13, 1998 at 12:53:20:

In Reply to: Re: Caffeine test?? posted by Jenny on April 13, 1998 at 10:42:14:

Jenny,

If you've found that the type O diet agrees with you I know something about you. You probably don't drink caffeinated drinks now but if you did in the past you were the type of person that would get gittery or not feel very well if you drank more than a couple of cups of coffee or had too much tea. You would DEFINATELY have to watch your evening intake of caffeine from any form (chocolate, tea, coffee) or it would keep you up late at night.

There are folks (and I'm sure that you know some of them) that can seemingly drink coffee by the gallon and drink it very late in the evening with none of the ill effects that I've described above.

The reason Dr. D'Adamo's diets work so well is that in them he suggests eliminating or limiting wheat, corn and milk which are the three major food allergens. Then (if you are lucky) you'll get the proper purine/protein intake from the diet for your blood type (purines are a type of protein that is key for your metabolism -- it is most abundant in dark meats and fishes, and VERY high concentration in organ meats). You are finding that you need a good dose of purine in your diet. Others will find just the opposite.

Unfortunately while there is some correlation between blood type and metabolic type it is only a correlation that is correct about 75% of the time. I feel for the folks that fall in the other 25%.

Dr. D should be commended for putting out the word that NO ONE DIET IS APPROPRIATE FOR EVERYONE and that LECTINS can play a powerful role. In the end I've realized that we've inherited our adaptation to foods. In other words there are foods that we are very well adapted to and those that we are not -- and it depends on heredity -- which is now muddled by lots of genetic mixing -- especially during the last 200 years.

Bob


More on the Caffeine test??

Posted by Jenny on April 13, 1998 at 13:09:26:

In Reply to: Re: Caffeine test?? posted by Robert McFerran on April 13, 1998 at 12:53:20:

Bob,
Could you be a bit more specific about caffeine test you referred to before?

Re your comments on the D'Adamo diet...I dunno.... A few weeks before I started it, I had a $350 food sensitivity blood test done, which showed NO reaction to wheat, corn, or dairy. That's why I tried the D'Adamo diet with EXTREME skepticism. I did not do the diet for weight loss--I've never had a weight problem, but I finally had to admit that my 3-4 years on a vegetarian diet was making me sick, and that the blood-type/lectin theory might explain why. I appreciate your comments very much, as I am suspicious of simplistic answers and like to hear from all points of view.

(P.S. I LOVE strong coffee and all kinds of tea, but I do limit them to 2 or 3 cups a day.)


Re: Blood type diet?

Posted by Nancy on April 13, 1998 at 19:15:48:

In Reply to: Re: Blood type diet? posted by Robert McFerran on April 12, 1998 at 21:11:34:

I'm one of those A+ s that had reactive hypocycemia from eating the foods recommended for my blood type in that book. Since chaging to a high protein, lo carb diet I have much more energy. For what it's worth.



Re: Caffeine test??

Posted by Nancy on April 13, 1998 at 19:19:56:

In Reply to: Re: Caffeine test?? posted by Robert McFerran on April 13, 1998 at 12:53:20:

Robert

How's your book coming? I'm looking forward to reading it.

Nancy


Re: More on the Caffeine test??

Posted by Robert McFerran on April 13, 1998 at 19:31:41:

In Reply to: More on the Caffeine test?? posted by Jenny on April 13, 1998 at 13:09:26:

Jenny,

Why do you limit these caffeinated drinks? Do they make you feel jittery or anxious/nervous when you've had too much? Do they ever keep you awake at night?

Does that first cup of high octane coffee in the morning renew you to the point where you wonder why EVERYONE doesn't drink it?

I'm afraid that the blood test that you had was a waste of money. I mean really, at best they are only about 50% accurate right now with so many false positives and false negatives that it makes me crazy to think this is how the concept of food sensitivity is being used by both holistic and allopathic practicioners (sigh).

If you want the real deal use the search engine on this BB to find my protocol for the elimination diet. It is the only way that you will KNOW for sure that you're not routinely poisoning yourself with even one food (which could significantly increase your symptoms).

If you answered yes, yes and no to the questions above you're on the right track with the O diet. If you answered no, no and yes the O diet will not give you the mileage that you deserve.

Bob


Re: Caffeine test??

Posted by Robert McFerran on April 13, 1998 at 19:39:00:

In Reply to: Re: Caffeine test?? posted by Nancy on April 13, 1998 at 19:19:56:

Nancy,

I'm still working on the book. I've written and re-written the protocol section about 5 times. I've got the pieces that I want but I'm still not happy with the way it flows. As you know I'm trying to give the reader some of the complexity that is actually there but I'm trying to avoid too much confusion from seeping in.

I guess time will tell.....

Thanks for asking!

Bob


Re: Blood type diet?

Posted by Walt Stoll on April 14, 1998 at 19:02:37:

In Reply to: Re: Blood type diet? posted by Terri on April 12, 1998 at 23:26:38:

Dear Terri,

REMEMBER, as you stop being in the chronic fight or flight mode (after a few months of skilled relaxation) your physiology will become radically different. ANY specific diet that helps you now may make you sick after that.

Is this making sense to you?

Walt



Re: Caffeine test??

Posted by Nancy on April 16, 1998 at 19:46:23:

In Reply to: Re: Caffeine test?? posted by Robert McFerran on April 13, 1998 at 19:39:00:

Robert

If the first 3 installments are any indication, the book will be fantastic.

Nancy


Metabolic type diet

Posted by Beate Clark on April 20, 1998 at 11:26:18:

This message is for Bob McFerran

Dear Bob,
I have been reading the excerpt of your upcoming book with great interest (and can't wait to read the rest of it). I remember reading your posts back in the Prodigy days and have always been intrigued by them.
I suspect I am a metabolic meat eater (type O blood), but don't really like meat. How long before switching to the "correct" diet before one can expect results? I have trouble digesting heavy proteins, even with added enzymes. Do I need to force this stuff down, endure digestive upset and headaches as a result, and just wait for the good benefits to kick in eventually, or do you have another approach?
Beate


Re: Metabolic type diet

Posted by Robert McFerran on April 20, 1998 at 14:17:20:

In Reply to: Metabolic type diet posted by Beate Clark on April 20, 1998 at 11:26:18:

Beate,

Their are three general metabolic subsets. I usually have folks run the elimination diet BEFORE they embark on the appropriate metabolic diet. By doing so they won't 'mask' the benefit of the right metabolic diet with complications from food allergens.

Running the elimination diet also gives insight into your metabolic type since the foods in it are decidedly 'light'. The person who has inherited a metabolism requiring heavier fare will do fine but just find themselves eating more -- especially the fish (at least twice a day). The opposite metabolic type will find that by not eating much that they feel great with lots of energy and wouldn't miss eating the fish.

When you run the elimination diet you will feel withdrawal and then a clearing of symptoms. When you embark on the appropriate metabolic diet afterward you will feel more energy (if you feel worse then it's simply not the right dietary subset -- so much for those diet theories of 'healing crisis'. You'll be surprised to find that you won't suffer gastic problems and won't have to take additional enzymes even when you are eating fatty meats IF you properly limit your carbohydrate intake (if you are a 'heavy' metabolic type).

I don't know if you're familiar with the metabolic diet that I'm describing. You can probably find it if you use the search engine here on the board. If not let me know and I'll repost it.

Thanks for your comments on the book! I might jump back on Prodigy for a 'free' month just to visit with some of my old friends on the Arthritis Support BB. Is Dr. Sedrish still there?

Bob


Re: Metabolic type diet

Posted by Beate Clark on April 21, 1998 at 08:44:57:

In Reply to: Re: Metabolic type diet posted by Robert McFerran on April 20, 1998 at 14:17:20:

Dear Bob,

thanks for your reply. Of course what you said makes sense. As soon as I have the time I will do the elimination diet and go from there.

I really enjoyed your book; it has just enough detail to explain the concepts and is very readable and concise. I dont't have arthritis (I suffer from chronic fatigue), but if this diet works, it should help many if not most people with chronic conditions. I think I remember you saying that you have helped others with different conditions. If so, maybe you should not limit the title of the book to just arthritis. It would be of interest to a much wider group of people.

I have not visited the Prodigy boards in quite a while. They seemed dead the last time I did.

Thanks again.

Beate


Re: Metabolic type diet

Posted by Robert McFerran on April 21, 1998 at 13:09:40:

In Reply to: Re: Metabolic type diet posted by Beate Clark on April 21, 1998 at 08:44:57:

Beate,

You are quite right. This stuff works for a far broader range of things other than arthritis.

I'm probably going to stay with arthritis as the target of my first book. I've had experience now with well over 50 folks who have had various types of arthritis. If they put in the work to make the changes I suggested they have ALL gotten better. To my chagrin they have gotten better than me!

I do see that something similar could be written to a broader audience and I also see a special book for women. The phenomenon of metabolic cycling (into different metabolic types at different times of their hormonal cycle) is real (I've seen it too often). This is one key to a puzzle for too many women that cannot continue to go ignored.

Bob


BioBalancing

Posted by Vicki on April 24, 1998 at 14:08:55:

Dear Walt,

Thank you for your very helpful responses to my questions about CoQ10 and calcium deposits. Now I have another one--this time about Dr. Rudolph Wiley's book, "BioBalancing," which I've just finished reading, (For those unfamiliar with Dr. Wiley's work, he uses venous blood pH to classify people as more "acidic" or more "alkaline," and prescribes the sort of diet that each type should eat.) I was especially interested in the book because of the reported relationship between eating the proper diet for one's blood pH and mental symptoms.
My question is: what became of the biobalancing concept? Was it discredited? Did it just die of neglect? I did a search on the internet and found only one reference to it--a doctor in Indianapolis uses it in his practice.

Vicki


Re: BioBalancing

Posted by Walt Stoll on April 26, 1998 at 11:56:43:

In Reply to: BioBalancing posted by Vicki on April 24, 1998 at 14:08:55:

Dear Vicki,

You will find that few people promote approaches that do not make money for the promoter. That has been the albatross around the neck of the AMA as well. Unfortunately, it seems to be the policy of the AMA so the albatross doesn't bother them at all.

Your bodymind is still the only thing that would tell you if this is the approach for you. Dr Wiley would be the first to say that it doesn't work for everyone. Its drawback is that the participant has to learn a lot & then do the work to apply it well enough, and long enough to find out if it works for them.

Let us know your experiences if you get so far as to try it.

Walt



Re: BioBalancing

Posted by Vicki on April 27, 1998 at 14:14:29:

In Reply to: Re: BioBalancing posted by Walt Stoll on April 26, 1998 at 11:56:43:

Dear Walt,
I don't think biobalancing is the answer to my husband's problems, partly because it looks to me like another method of treating symptoms rather than causes (e.g., the times in one's life when Dr Wiley says changes in blood pH are likely to occur are all times when there are a lot of hormonal changes going on, such as onset and end of puberty, childbirth, and menopause), and partly because the diets are formidable. I don't think we could adhere to them for a month, let alone a lifetime. Having said that, I'm considering trying it for a couple of days just to see what happens. Will keep you posted on the results.

Vicki



Re: BioBalancing

Posted by Vicki on April 28, 1998 at 13:30:40:

Dear Bob,
I really appreciate your responding to my inquiry about biobalancing. In his book, Dr Wiley impressed me as a sincere and dedicated person, not at all like someone trying to profit from people's illnesses. I was disappointed to think no one had picked up the thread of his work.
I read the excerpt from your book with great interest. It fits with what I've been reading by not only Wiley and Watson but by Philpott and D'Adamo as well. It's totally fascinating to me, to the point that I would feel guilty about using my ever-patient husband as a guinea pig if I didn't believe that he will benefit in the end from my "experiments" on him.
As I mentioned previously, I do intend to try the biobalancing diet for a time at least and see what the results are. My husband is type O negative, diagnosed as hypoglycemic, sensitive to wheat (and perhaps other glutenous grains as well), of Swiss descent. It won't surprise me if he does well on the diet for acidic individuals. The biggest problem is that I suspect I am alkaline--blood type A, sensitive to dairy products and nightshades, low stomach acid, and I could be perfectly happy as a vegetarian (except for an occasional craving for fried chicken).

Vicki



Re: BioBalancing

Posted by Robert McFerran on April 28, 1998 at 17:02:38:

In Reply to: Re: BioBalancing posted by Vicki on April 28, 1998 at 13:30:40:

Vicki,

Running an elimination diet FIRST is key! Too many folks just do the metabolic diets and they aren't impressed (or can't even tell the difference). The problem is that hidden food allergies are masking the benefit of moving to the proper metabolic diet.

One of the reasons Dr. D'Adamo's regimine works fairly well (if you are lucky enough to have inherited a metabolism that matches his blood types) is that he suggests eliminating the major food allergens! If you cruise his board you will find unfortunately that many of the folks actually feel worse after several weeks of sticking to the recommended diet. He excuses this as a 'healing crisis'!! It is not. It is the wrong metabolic diet.

IF your husband has proven to be hypoglycemic via a 5 hour glucose tolerance test he is by definition what Dr. Wiley would call an acid type (Dr. Watson would call it him a fast oxidizer and I'm going to be calling it hunter-gatherer in my book). You can't really tell much from the inheritance thing since there has been too much genetic mixing. The Swiss that Dr. Price found in the Lowenthal Valley at the turn of the century had what Dr. Wiley would have called a classic 'mixed' metabolizer.

As for yourself it's tougher. Generally how you respond to coffee is the best way to predict inherited metabolism beyond trying all three diets. Testing the different diets IS a good idea because you will EXPERIENCE FIRSTHAND the significant difference in energy level once you eat food that your physiology is best adapted to converting to energy.

Of course you need to watch for the 'cycling' phenomenon during your menstrual cycle (one reason for your fried chicken cravings). By the way this phenomenon is a RESULT of continued genetic mixing. As you might have assessed from the brief dietary history of man in my previous post, we are forcing our physiology to change. The question will be can it change fast enough or are we willing to slow the change?

Bob


Re: BioBalancing

Posted by Vicki on April 29, 1998 at 14:35:33:

In Reply to: Re: BioBalancing posted by Robert McFerran on April 28, 1998 at 17:02:38:

Bob,

Actually, it was through an elimination diet that we first discovered my husband's sensitivity to wheat (6 years ago) and began to understand that his symptoms were caused by some sort of biochemical imbalance in his brain. We eliminated 7 of the most common allergenic foods, one of them being wheat, for 3 weeks. During the second week, we noticed that he had been stable for several days in a row (quite unusual at that time). The day after we reintroduced wheat into our diet, he experienced severe symptoms which didn't subside for 4 days. We were advised by a nutritionist that people of northern European descent who have blue eyes and were blond as children (guess who) are especially likely to be sensitive to wheat. Unfortunately, eliminating wheat from his diet has not totally eliminated his symptoms, although they are rarely so severe these days.

I am no longer much concerned about my own problem--respiratory congestion. Although it used to be quite serious (I was diagnosed as having COPD, which apparently means "respiratory condition for which we know neither the cause nor the cure"), I have learned to control it satisfactorily. After giving both conventional and alternative medical practitioners a try (fruitless), I discovered through reading and experimentation that taking HCl tablets after eating eliminates 90% of the congestion problem.

I'm not sure how to interpret the coffee thing. We stopped drinking coffee for several years (didn't like the headaches on days when we didn't drink it). We now drink it with breakfast once or twice a week. It seems to be more psychological with me--I'm not crazy about the taste, and half a cup is plenty for me; my husband seems to have more of a craving for it and claims he can't function as well when he doesn't drink it. Of course, because we don't drink it so often, the effects are rather exaggerated when we do.

Vicki



Re: BioBalancing

Posted by Robert McFerran on April 29, 1998 at 17:52:42:

In Reply to: Re: BioBalancing posted by Vicki on April 29, 1998 at 14:35:33:

Vicky,

Here is the PROPER way to run an elimination diet. As you will see it is far superior to what was recommended to you before.

THE ELIMINATION DIET

I’ve often talked with folks that were confident that foods didn’t have any impact on their symptoms. I ask is if they’ve ever run a good ‘elimination’ diet and a surprising number assure me that they have. Upon further questioning I always find that they have only eliminated a couple of foods, say milk or wheat or nightshade vegetables (tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, etc.). Even though milk and wheat are common food allergens and nightshade vegetables create problems for those possessing one specific metabolism, this should not be considered a true elimination diet.

Over 85% of people with chronic disease have food allergies. Most will find not one, but a handful of foods acting as the major culprits. This is the reason why eliminating just one or two random foods is all but useless. If you were allergic to a large number of tree pollens, springtime grasses and weeds the removal of only one of these airborne allergens would usually have little impact on your total allergy symptoms. If the allergen was added back into the mix you probably wouldn’t notice. The effect from this one allergen would be hidden or ‘masked’ by your already prominent symptoms to the other allergens. The same phenomenon occurs with foods.

How could we find whether the airborne allergen in the above example was a significant factor in triggering our allergic symptoms? The best way would be to place ourselves in a room with perfectly filtered air (in essence eliminating all airborne allergens) until our allergy symptoms abated. The specific allergen would then be re-introduced and any allergic reaction noted. In this way the impact of a single, specific allergen can be isolated and tested. What was previously thought to be a rather insignificant allergen would often deliver a surprisingly strong allergic response.

We can do the same thing with foods. Historically ‘spring water fasts’ have been employed. Patients would drink only spring water for the initial 4-5 days. This type of ‘fast’ would obviously eliminate all food allergens from the diet. It was maintained for 4-5 days to also allow physical elimination of all foods eaten prior to the start of the ‘fast’ from the digestive tract.

Spring water fasts have one major problem. A significant percentage of individuals cannot tolerate them and should not try them. Their metabolic demands make any kind of extended water fast dangerous.

Fortunately years of previous testing has provided a list of ‘safe’ foods that can be temporarily substituted for your usual diet. These foods are not completely hypo-allergenic but they do have a low allergenic potential. In other words they are rarely found to induce a reaction. The foods include cod, trout, mackerel, pears, parsnips, turnips, rutabaga, sweet potatoes, yams, celery, zucchini, carrots and peaches. Any foods routinely eaten more than twice a week should be removed from the list. All the foods must be fresh and in their ‘whole’ or natural form. No cans or other packaging allowed.

Spring water or sparkling water are the only acceptable liquids. The only allowed condiment is sea or mineral salt. Steaming is an excellent method of preparing foods during your elimination diet.

Prior to starting the diet you’ll need to purchase a bottle of magnesium citrate (found in the laxative section) and alka-seltzer ‘gold’ (it’s found only in the gold colored box). All drugs should be continued. Smoking should be ceased when initiating the diet. You will not be able to eat at restaurants during the diet.

If you work Thursday evening will be the best time to begin. Wait two hours after dinner and pour one-half of the contents of the bottle of magnesium citrate into a tall glass. Add an equal amount of water and some ice and drink slowly. Repeat the same procedure with the remainder of the magnesium citrate


Re: BioBalancing

Posted by Vicki on April 30, 1998 at 13:29:19:

In Reply to: Re: BioBalancing posted by Robert McFerran on April 29, 1998 at 17:52:42:

Bob,

That's a pretty hard core diet. The thought of eating steamed fish and rutabagas 3 times a day doesn't exactly make my mouth wate, but I could survive almost anything for a brief time. It will take some doing, however, to get my husband to cooperate (he did the previous one because it was supposed to be for MY benefit).

I have a few questions:

- How much magnesium citrate is in a bottle? Does it come in more than one size bottle?

- Is Day 6 the last day?

My husband does get jittery if he drinks too much coffee, and it will keep him awake if he drinks it too late in the day. He attributes this to the fact that he doesn't drink it very often (1-3 times a week with breakfast).

He was told by the Carl Pfeiffer Clinic in Illinois that he was hypoglycemic, but I don't know what they based the diagnosis on. They did not do a 5-hour glucose tolerance test. We did one at home with a kit we bought at a pharmacy. It's been awhile since I looked at the results, but, as I recall, his glucose level shot up very high within the first half hour, then dropped rapidly before gradually coming back up to the fasting level. We checked it every 15 minutes during the first hour and every 30 minutes after that.

Vicki


Re: BioBalancing

Posted by Robert McFerran on April 30, 1998 at 13:53:56:

In Reply to: Re: BioBalancing posted by Vicki on April 30, 1998 at 13:29:19:

Vicki,

I've only seen one size bottle of the magnesium citrate -- probably between 8 and 12 fluid oz. That should certainly do the trick.

Day six is the last day. Actually if you 'clear' faster you can start testing foods after 5 days.

Based on what you are saying I would have your husband segue into testing the foods from the acid diet after he clears from the elimination diet.

As your note describes -- there is lots of misinformation about what hypoglycemia really is. Too many docs have made this diagnosis improperly based on symptoms alone (which could be due to inheriting a metabolism from the opposite side of the metabolic spectrum). Classic hypoglycemia demands that blood sugar actually falls BELOW the fasting level. There are other types of hypoglycemia (look up Dr. Philpott's description in Brain Allergies).

The elimination diet isn't really as bad as it might seem. The biggest problem is with food preparation and food preparation is a breeze if you buy a Black and Decker steamer. It does a great job with the vegetables and the fish. By the way if you husband is hypoglycemic he'll find himself eating more fish with earlier meals (i.e. breakfast and lunch) to sustain him.

Bob


Re: BioBalancing

Posted by Laura on April 30, 1998 at 21:26:49:

Just 2 comments:
1) What does one use for protein on the elimination diet if one is allergic to fish? I have a client who is.

2) In your up-coming book could you kindly refer to the human race as humans, or homo sapiens, rather than the archaic "Man". This is the nineties. Words perpetuate customs. I found myself paying more attention to your sexist language than the content of the writing. Otherwise I enjoy your previews very much. Thanks.

Healthfully,
Laura


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