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Calcium Deposits in joints

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Calcium Deposits in joints

Posted by
Mare Weinhold on January 15, 2001 at 18:11:03:

My husband has been diagnosed as having calcium depostis on his knees, elbows, and a likely possiblity of this to occur on other joints. It is extremely painful and severely impairs his ability to perform simple physical maneuvers required in normal everyday living (walking, climbing stairs). It may be significant that he had a heart attack six months ago. I have a couple of questions regarding this:

Are you aware of any cure to this condition? We have tried several orthoscopies, and have experienced limited success.

Will knee replacement be effective and long-lasting?

Is there anything that we should be aware of in relation to his diet?

Is there a medical term for such a condition?

Thank you -



Re: Calcium Deposits in joints

Posted by
Rich on January 16, 2001 at 11:20:19:

In Reply to: Calcium Deposits in joints posted by Mare Weinhold on January 15, 2001 at 18:11:03:

Hi. The calcium deposits in the joints are largely ionic calcium. This is readily available for removal with chelation therapy. Most people know this as a therapy to remove heavy metals and clear the arteries of plaque. However, it also helps to regulate calcium metabolism. Chelation can take the ionic calcium deposits out of the joints and out from other structures like tendons, ligaments, and arteries and even organs and put that calcium back to use for the body (bones, teeth and such). I believe this may be the best way to remove the calcium. Many people who get chelation therapy report greater muscle and joint flexibility, largely for this reason.

One other consideration is to find out why the calcium depostited itself there. There is only one reason for a calcium deposit to be formed,....weakness!! Calcium deposits are your body's way of fixing a weak spot. So, if your husband feels better from chelation and the calicum deposits are removed, he will maintain greater results if he does something to stablize the joints. Prolotherapy would be a great option for him. Prolotherapy strengthens the ligaments and tendons aroung the joints. This added strength will stop calcium deposits from forming in the first place.

Dietary wise, stay way from refined foods, and eat foods with a high content of magnesium, calcium and potassium (cultured dairy foods like yogurt and kefir are better than liquid milk products and are better absorbed.) Also, stay away from caffeine and chocolate, they throw calcium out of balance and will not help the situation.

For pain right now, try glucosamine sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, MSM, Cetyl Myristoleate, Boswellia, EPA's (like fish oil or marine oils). It will take a few weeks to notice effects.

The chelation treatments are usally performed 20-30 times before deemed completed. There are plenty of other benfits to chelation like improved circulation, improved cardiovascular function, improved kidney and liver function, the removal of heavy metals and better calcium utilization.

I think this is a great option however, Dr. Stoll may have an easier idea. I personally think that chelation is the best way to remove calcium deposits. Without removing its cause (weakness and diet) it will come back over time

Rich



Re: Calcium Deposits in joints

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 17, 2001 at 12:58:28:

In Reply to: Calcium Deposits in joints posted by Mare Weinhold on January 15, 2001 at 18:11:03:

Hi, Mare.

It is called arthritis (regardless of what you might have been told).

See the glossary and archives about arthritis and associated conditions.

THEN, if you still have questions, write again.

Walt



arthritis?

Posted by
Rich on January 18, 2001 at 00:41:07:

In Reply to: Re: Calcium Deposits in joints posted by Walt Stoll on January 17, 2001 at 12:58:28:

I am curious. I have some calcium deposits in my fingers from playing the piano for many years, yet, I have no arthritis. I have had x-rays and blood tests. no arthritis. No reduction in flexibility. Pain? sure, a little but no de-calcification or errosion. Why then, do you say calcium deposits = arthritis? Thanks

Rich



Re: arthritis? (Archive.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 20, 2001 at 08:06:56:

In Reply to: arthritis? posted by Rich on January 18, 2001 at 00:41:07:

Hi, Rich.

Because they are identical. There cannnot be one without the other. My wife has the same thing that you have and her father also had it. Eventually any idiot can make the diagnosis and they will when you have progressed that far. Or course, by then it will be a little late for you to do much about it.

They just don't bother saying to you the magic word (arthritis) since conventional medicine has little to offer but symptomatic relief, as the problem progresses, relentlessly. So long as you have no symptoms, they are doing you a favor by not treating you since most conventional treatments actually cause the arthritis to progress faster while the symptoms are being relieved.

Remember, I was a board certified family practitioner for 30 years while I finally learned to look at things differently for the last 15. I have seen it both ways and know of what I speak.

Hope this helps.

Walt



help me?

Posted by Rich on January 20, 2001 at 12:08:19:

In Reply to: Re: arthritis? (Archive.) posted by Walt Stoll on January 20, 2001 at 08:06:56:

okay, you have my attention. The only calcium deposits I know of are in my fingers. I have no restriction in motion, no bone errosion. i do have pain, I crack my knuckles a lot (when you use the fingers as much as I do, they get tense and tight and cracking helps). I can see swelling on the joints that bend the fingers. What do I need to do about this? I can't stop cracking them and the pain and uncomfortable feeling isn't getting any better. many doctors have looked at this and they also say "no arthritis". Their suggestion is to stop cracking my knuckles. it's a good suggestion but doesn't work. when, i stop, within a day they start getting stiff and they hurt even more. it sure does SOUND like arthritis but I have no degeneration. What should I do about this? My livelyhood depends on my being able to function well and I have no intention on retiring at 25. ????

Rich

p.s Thanks for reading this



so what is when they DO call it arthritis? (sorry Silly Q?.)

Posted by wendy g on January 21, 2001 at 00:16:36:

In Reply to: Re: arthritis? (Archive.) posted by Walt Stoll on January 20, 2001 at 08:06:56:

so what it is when they DO finally call it arthritis - (Dx it and call it by name I mean) is it then just more severe degeneration? (guessing) more inflammation, enough so it can be seen on x-ray ? and therefore they have measured it/proved it is (has been for ages)there?



Re: help me? (Archive in arthritis.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 22, 2001 at 12:26:09:

In Reply to: help me? posted by Rich on January 20, 2001 at 12:08:19:

Hi, Rich.

I think it is too late to stop "cracking" your knuckles. It is only a nervous habit so you could stop it if you really wanted to. What you see as "improvement" of symptoms when you "crack" them is a placebo effect.

Your docs are going to wait until any idiot can make the diagnosis of arthritis and THEN they will tell you.

Your best bet is to learn what causes arthritis and reverse those causes (archives about arthritis).

Once you have done your homework, if you still have questions, write again.

Walt



ok. will study all this week. I will be back next week. thanks!!

Posted by Rich on January 22, 2001 at 13:11:02:

In Reply to: Re: help me? (Archive in arthritis.) posted by Walt Stoll on January 22, 2001 at 12:26:09:

nmi



Re: ok. will study all this week. I will be back next week. thanks!!

Posted by
Vince F on January 22, 2001 at 14:30:19:

In Reply to: ok. will study all this week. I will be back next week. thanks!! posted by Rich on January 22, 2001 at 13:11:02:

Don't know if I believe this but researchers in England said
that the cracking of knuckles is breaking Air Bubbles that
come from movement of the fingers. I haven't cracked mine in
a long time and just tried to and only got a few to crack.
Seems like when I Used to do it often there felt like a need
so maybe there was a discomfort that built up.

VF



Re: so what is when they DO call it arthritis? (sorry Silly Q?.) (Archive in arthritis.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 23, 2001 at 09:21:01:

In Reply to: so what is when they DO call it arthritis? (sorry Silly Q?.) posted by wendy g on January 21, 2001 at 00:16:36:

Hi, Wendy.

Good questions. It is when the person has actual symptoms OR our primitive technology can see it. OR, like RA, when certain blood tests show up typical patterns.

The history of medicine has always been that only when the diagnosis is advanced enough for the knowledge of the time to call it something, is it called something. The science of the future will make these diagnoses MUCH earlier in the course of the condition than they do now.

Of course, the earlier the diagnosis is made, the easier it is to reverse it. Doesn't the AMA pay lip service to "early diagnisis". However, unless there is somethig the conventional monopoly knows that will alter the course of any chronic disease, they will not make the diagnosis until they can treat the symptoms of the person--the only thing conventional medicine has to offer anyhow.

Making sense?

Walt



Re: so what is when they DO call it arthritis? (sorry Silly Q?.) (Archive in arthritis.) Archive in philosophy.

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 23, 2001 at 09:21:37:

In Reply to: so what is when they DO call it arthritis? (sorry Silly Q?.) posted by wendy g on January 21, 2001 at 00:16:36:

Hi, Wendy.

Good questions. It is when the person has actual symptoms OR our primitive technology can see it. OR, like RA, when certain blood tests show up typical patterns.

The history of medicine has always been that only when the diagnosis is advanced enough for the knowledge of the time to call it something, is it called something. The science of the future will make these diagnoses MUCH earlier in the course of the condition than they do now.

Of course, the earlier the diagnosis is made, the easier it is to reverse it. Doesn't the AMA pay lip service to "early diagnisis". However, unless there is somethig the conventional monopoly knows that will alter the course of any chronic disease, they will not make the diagnosis until they can treat the symptoms of the person--the only thing conventional medicine has to offer anyhow.

Making sense?

Walt



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