Diabetes Archives

Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs.

[ Diabetes Archive ]
[ Main Archives Page ] [ Glossary/Index ]
[ FAQ ] [ Recommended Books ] [ Bulletin Board ]
   Search this site!
 
        

Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs.

Posted by PhillyLady [5444.2761] on March 29, 2007 at 14:36:26:

Hello:

I just received this email from the "Daily Health News".
-----------------------------------------------------


Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems

If you like detective stories, you're going to love this. Bear with me, and I'll tell you a story that will set the stage for what's to come.

As you know, I'm very passionate about the environment, so a few years ago when a story came out about how the population of gray tree frogs was being decimated by the use of a common pesticide (carbaryl), it got my attention. But here's the thing -- the makers of carbaryl insisted it wasn't harming the frogs. They had a ton of studies showing that if you take the little creatures and put them in a lab setting and expose them to the pesticide, nothing happens.

But still, the tree frogs were dying. And the environmentalists were positive it had something to do with their continued exposure to this pesticide.

Enter Columbo, in the form of Rick Relyea, PhD, an ecologist from the University of Pittsburgh. Long story short, Dr. Relyea discovered that carbaryl was less harmful to frogs in the unnaturally tranquil setting of the lab (at least it was less likely to kill them). But most tree frogs don't live in a lab, they live in the wild. And in the wild there are constant dangers from predators. When tree frog tadpoles were exposed to a predator, the predator emitted a chemical cue that resulted in a stress response in the gray tree frog -- a stress response just like we get when we're caught in traffic or miss a deadline. Expose a stressed frog to the pesticide and you've got a dead frog. The combination of the two -- physiological stress and a low-level pesticide, neither of which has a significant impact on survival alone -- was lethal for a majority of the gray tree frog tadpoles.

"In other species such as bullfrog tadpoles, carbaryl became up to 46 times more deadly with the addition of predator cues. Moreover, this phenomenon has since been observed with both insecticides and herbicides, suggesting that it may be a quite common phenomenon," says Dr. Relyea.

The take home point -- and the reason for this story -- is that elements in the environment often interact with elements of our own physiology to cause serious problems. And new research is emerging that suggests we may be seeing exactly the same phenomenon with diabetes.

AN INTERESTING TRAIL OF BREADCRUMBS

We've long known that obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes. But now it appears that exposure to pollutants can seriously aggravate the risk, and -- in combination with obesity -- may be associated with the increased risk of becoming diabetic. A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care looked at the connection between six persistent organic pollutants (known as POPs) and diabetes... and what they found was dramatic.

The prevalence of diabetes increased by 14- to 38-fold as the concentrations of the sum of the six POPs increased, irrespective of participants' weight, said lead researcher Duk-Hee Lee, MD, PhD. Her team divided the 2,016 subjects into groups comparing five levels of pollutants. Group 1 had the lowest levels and group 5 had the highest levels. Compared with group 1 (which had a .4% incidence of diabetes), group 2 had a 6.7% incidence of diabetes, while group 5 had an astonishing 25.6% incidence of the disease (groups 3 and 4 ranged in between). Dr. Lee told me that while obesity remains a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, the obese and overweight people with very low concentrations of POPs had a much lower incidence of diabetes. Could obesity and pollutants interact to cause diabetes in much the way that the pesticide and stress interacted to cause the death of frogs?

"It's our hypothesis that obesity might be only weakly associated with diabetes among people with very low serum concentrations of POPs," Dr. Lee told me. She explained that while her research concentrated on only six specific pollutants out of about 50 POPs identified in the National Health and Examination Survey, there was a striking connection between the blood concentrations of these six toxins and the prevalence of diabetes. This is not the first time that such a connection has been demonstrated. Earlier research from Sweden also found that exposure to POPs may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. And earlier research also demonstrated that exposure to at least one toxin -- a dioxin called TCDD -- increases the risk of diabetes and insulin resistance. It's believed that these toxins may interfere with glucose metabolism.

POPs ARE EVERYWHERE

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) include certain chemical byproducts, PCBs and certain insecticides... they've been linked to cancer, neurobehavioral impairment, endocrine problems and reproductive disorders. Previous researchers looked at special populations that are occupationally or accidentally exposed to high levels of these pollutants, for example, Vietnam veterans. (The US Department of Veterans Affairs includes type 2 diabetes in its list of presumptive diseases associated with exposure to the dioxin-containing Agent Orange.) But Dr. Lee's study is the first to examine the cumulative effect of most commonly detected POPs among a random low-level exposure in the general population. The six toxins in the study are found in the environment, and move through the air and water to accumulate in the environment.

Dr. Lee was careful not to let me believe that pollutants by themselves necessarily cause diabetes, and expressed the usual researcher's caution about jumping to strong conclusions based on one or two studies. "Plenty of people have exposure to these pollutants and don't get diabetes," she explained. "But the strong connection between high levels and increased incidence is very hard to ignore, as is the fact that there are such low levels of diabetes among those with low levels of exposure, even among the overweight and obese." Could genes be a factor? "It's prudent to act as if everyone is at risk, regardless of genetic makeup," she told me.

How do we get exposed to these chemicals in the first place? "Exposure to POPs comes mostly from animal fatty food consumption," Dr. Lee told me. When I asked her what protective measures people might take, she answered concisely: "A low intake of animal food and a higher intake of plant food may be beneficial. And, aside from trying to avoid POPs, preventing obesity is still very important because the toxicity of POPs appeared to synergistically increase the risk of type 2 diabetes among obese persons."





Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs What to do? Archive..

Posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on March 29, 2007 at 16:36:39:

In Reply to: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs. posted by PhillyLady [5444.2761] on March 29, 2007 at 14:36:26:

Thanks, Philly.

Of course this is one of the causes but what can an individual do about this exposure now that we humans have "fouled our nest" so thoroughly? For now, we simply must concentrate on those causes that we CAN do something about: PWFD (started early in life is MOST effective), Aerobic exercise and SR (detailed "how to" in Jan's and my new book!)

Walt



Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs What to do? Archive..

Posted by PhillyLady [5066.2761] on March 29, 2007 at 17:29:54:

In Reply to: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs What to do? Archive.. posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on March 29, 2007 at 16:36:39:

Hey Doc:

We can do some positive things for ourselves (3LS), while some less positive things are unavoidable. I just know there are too many relatives and friends around me with diabetes.



Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs What to do? Archive..

Posted by Sally [8783.1590] on March 29, 2007 at 18:09:00:

In Reply to: Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs What to do? Archive.. posted by PhillyLady [5066.2761] on March 29, 2007 at 17:29:54:

It would still be good to know even if it is unavoidable. It's time to figure out how our pollution has impacted our health. If they start dredging the pcb's out of the Hudson River I may have no where to escape.



Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs.

Posted by Ron [1540.3359] on March 29, 2007 at 18:30:56:

In Reply to: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs. posted by PhillyLady [5444.2761] on March 29, 2007 at 14:36:26:

Hi Philly,

"The prevalence of diabetes increased by 14- to 38-fold as the concentrations of the sum of the six POPs increased, irrespective of participants' weight, said lead researcher Duk-Hee Lee, MD, PhD. Her team divided the 2,016 subjects into groups comparing five levels of pollutants. Group 1 had the lowest levels and group 5 had the highest levels. Compared with group 1 (which had a .4% incidence of diabetes), group 2 had a 6.7% incidence of diabetes, while group 5 had an astonishing 25.6% incidence of the disease (groups 3 and 4 ranged in between). Dr. Lee told me that while obesity remains a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, the obese and overweight people with very low concentrations of POPs had a much lower incidence of diabetes."

Here is what I read into the above:

Overweight women should not use household chemicals
Overweight women should not use copying machines
Overweight women should refrain from using perfume and other cosmetics, deodorants, as well as hair care, dyes and bleach.
Overweight women should take a holiday when lawn care chemicals are being sprayed on their property..
Overweight women will be able to sue their husbands for smoking in the house..
Overweight women will NOT be able to sue cigarette companies when illness occurs.
Overweight women should avoid household air fresheners and washer/dryer chemicals such as soaps and softeners.

Will it become a workplace injury claim when people in the housekeepper business become diabetic?
Will they have to start paying compensation premiums and stop working under the table for cash?

If western women refuse to do housecleaning, will everyone have to hire a housekeeper..

Will this scare the undocumented immigrants back into their own country?
If so, the wages paid to thin, (good looking) undocumented immigrants will be sure to rise... as the supply dries up.

Notice that I did not mention Overweight men in the above?
Why? Because we have always been exposed to chemicals in the workplace and we have no Women's Right Group to protect us.

Maybe one day, universites will offer courses in "Men's Studies" so we will become EQUAL.



But what about the frogs, Ron? nm

Posted by Sally [8783.1590] on March 29, 2007 at 19:49:13:

In Reply to: Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs. posted by Ron [1540.3359] on March 29, 2007 at 18:30:56:

nm

Follow Ups:


Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs.

Posted by PhillyLady [5066.2761] on March 29, 2007 at 20:37:24:

In Reply to: Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs. posted by Ron [1540.3359] on March 29, 2007 at 18:30:56:

Ron:

The study did not mention women, nor women's rights groups. Why are you interjecting nonsense into a serious and scientific study of diabetes?



Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs What to do? Archive..

Posted by PhillyLady [5066.2761] on March 29, 2007 at 20:38:42:

In Reply to: Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs What to do? Archive.. posted by Sally [8783.1590] on March 29, 2007 at 18:09:00:

Hi Sally:

"...It's time to figure out how our pollution has impacted our health"

You are correct, and the study did just that.

Follow Ups:


Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs.

Posted by Ron [1928.3359] on March 30, 2007 at 08:11:09:

In Reply to: Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs. posted by PhillyLady [5066.2761] on March 29, 2007 at 20:37:24:

Hi Philly,

Whenever a problem comes to light in a study, there will always be some group that takes it and twists it to
their benefit..
Just look at what happens with Global Warming...
Follow the Money.

If a couple more studies can duplicate what was found, then they will have more credibility.



Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs.

Posted by PhillyLady [5444.3245] on March 30, 2007 at 08:59:14:

In Reply to: Re: Diabetes Seeping Into Our Systems Through POPs. posted by Ron [1928.3359] on March 30, 2007 at 08:11:09:

Ron:

So far the only one who has twisted the study is you, Ron. Let it go, man, let it go:-)

Follow Ups:


[ Diabetes Archive ]
[ Main Archives Page ] [ Glossary/Index ]
[ FAQ ] [ Recommended Books ] [ Bulletin Board ]
   Search this site!