Dysautonomia archives

urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson

Posted by lm on January 12, 1999 at 10:17:03:

Hi. I have a problem with yawning. I feel like I need to do it constantly. I've even had a panic attack on the expressway when I couldn't yawn completely. I've been to two doctors for this. They've done blood work, upper GI, CAT scan, sinus and lung xrays. They couldn't find anything. I do have occasional heartburn they thought might be causing problems. Can you help?

Thank you,
LM


Follow Ups:


Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson

Posted by David Ferguson, D.C. on January 12, 1999 at 13:26:46:

In Reply to: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson posted by lm on January 12, 1999 at 10:17:03:

I had a similar problem quite a few years ago and my father(also a Dr. Ferguson) told me it was all in my head(in a nice way). I got ticked off but he was right. I don't know what the hell the mechanism is that was making me yawn but once I started trying to overcome the problem mentally it just went away. There will always be times when you have a tendency to yawn like church or long car trips but try to just get tough with yourself and tell yourself that you don't need to yawn. There is a large psychological connection with yawning. Notice how if you see someone else yawning or even think about it much that it makes you want to do it. I'd also advise skilled relaxation, making sure you get enough sleep, and making sure that it is good sleep(low noise, not snorring, etc.)

Hope that helps and don't get miffed by me saying it's mental and not physical. I hate Dr.s who push things off on patients brain rather than looking for a real problem but in my case it was my brain tricking me into thinking I needed to yawn. Hopefully the answer will be that easy for you.


Follow Ups:


Boy, talk about the power of suggestion....

Posted by trish on January 12, 1999 at 14:51:25:

In Reply to: Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson posted by David Ferguson, D.C. on January 12, 1999 at 13:26:46:

I feel like yawning just READING about it!

:-O

trish



What's wrong with yawning?

Posted by Sue Breeding on January 12, 1999 at 23:22:37:

In Reply to: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson posted by lm on January 12, 1999 at 10:17:03:

LM, All --

I cannot see what the big deal is about yawning, a totally natural thing to do.
This is something my body and mind really like. I always feel so much better and relaxed after yawning. A lot of people I know agree with this.

As always, your body knows what to do and how to do it well? Why not just go with it?

Sincerely,

Sue


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Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson

Posted by Helen David on January 13, 1999 at 00:08:17:

In Reply to: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson posted by lm on January 12, 1999 at 10:17:03:

In the book< "Decoding the Secret Language of Your Body, the many ways our bodies send us messages", by Martin Rush, the author says this about yawning:Because the yawn is a prelude to sleep, and sleep is a refuge ftom unhappy situations or moods, the yawn can then be translated as the body's response to something you want to escape or get away from, in short, something you don't like at all

"The value of sleep as an escape is not unfamiliar to any of us, and the yawn as the harbinger of sleep is a clear indication that something is happening that is making you yearn to escape the circumstance through sleep.

So watch that yawn. It can be telling you there's something going on, whether externally or internally that you'd prefer to be away from, to escape, or to sleep through. It may be saying, 'I hate this kind of stuff.'"

Just another point of view. This is a very interesting book. Talks about signals from the body trying to let us know what we are really feeling, feelings we do not want to acknowledge. The more attention we pay to our feelings, the more likely we are to notice when we feel bad and "let the feelings out", so we don't get sick.

For example, he says whispers from the body are things such as the blush, the cough, sneeze, runny nose, yawn, goose bumps, louder cries are back pain, neck and shoulders, nausea. common cold, sore throat, headaches, migraines, skin disorders, baldness and screams from the body are things like appendicitis, asthma, arthritis, emphysema, hypertension and kidney stones.

There is also a section on signals from women's bodies such as endometriosis infertility, vaginitis, cystitis.

Sounds like Walt Stoll stuff to me-getting to the real reason behind the symptoms.

And as Bob says, sometimes just acknowledging it is a psychological thing gets rid of the symptoms. This worked with my back pain. Thing is, it's good to find the real reason so other symptoms don't pop up.

Hope you find relief, soon.

Helen


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Urge to yawn:Helpful insight!

Posted by Jenny on January 13, 1999 at 07:46:45:

In Reply to: Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson posted by Helen David on January 13, 1999 at 00:08:17:

Helen, thanks for sharing this information! I've been watching this thread with interest. I don't have the yawning symptom myself, but I have a yoga student who, at the beginning of each yoga class, yawns repeatedly. This goes on for 15 or 20 minutes, and finally subsides. I had never encountered this before, and didn't know what could be causing it. I think Martin Rush's theory is exactly right, in her case at least. My student, while saying she was committed to a yoga practice, managed to find a wide assortment of "problems" with doing it. Excessive yawning was one of these. My instinct was that this was an unconscious way of resisting the transformation that yoga was offering her. Rush's book sounds fascinating--I must get it!



Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson, more info.

Posted by lm on January 13, 1999 at 09:47:46:

In Reply to: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson posted by lm on January 12, 1999 at 10:17:03:

I guess I didn't give enough information, so here goes:

I have the urge to yawn constantly (every breath), sometimes I feel like I can't catch my breath,
I have a burning in my throat all the way down the esophagus,
I have thick mucus that coats my mouth and the back of my throat, especially after eating anything with sugar,
I have pain in the left lung and heart area,
I'm also a long-term, untreated insomniac,
My back and neck hurt,
I have a persistant cough (I don't smoke),
I just started counseling for anxiey and panic attacks associated with this problem.

My doctor says it's from stress, but gives me nothing to help with the distressing symptoms. Right now I'm working very hard to find a SR that will work for me. My counselor says in the analogy of the cliff, I've fallen off and am hanging on by my fingertips.

Lots of love to everyone for any insight or just encouragement....................LM


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Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 13, 1999 at 11:10:00:

In Reply to: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson posted by lm on January 12, 1999 at 10:17:03:

Hi, LM.

This is a fairly comon metabolic problem that is becoming a lot more common.

ALL of the responses I have seen so far are worth while.

MY response would be to do some reading so you will have a better idea which directly relate to you. It would be helpful to me if you would list ANY other chronic symptoms you might have and how long you have had each in relationship to THIS one.

There are 3 references that I would suggest you start with: A. Since this has to do with pH balance in the body, you might call this to Robert McFerran's attention by listing his nome in the title of this note. B. "Nutrition & the Mind" by Gary Null, PhD or "Brain Allergies" by William Philpott, MD. AND, C. "Mind as Healer, Mind as Slayer" by Kenneth Pelletier, PhD (most recent edition).

Once I see more symptoms, I may have other ideas. Once you have the above under your belt, if you have more questions, write again.

Walt




Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson, more info.

Posted by Waalt Stoll on January 13, 1999 at 11:16:02:

In Reply to: Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson, more info. posted by lm on January 13, 1999 at 09:47:46:

Dear LM,

This additional information is EXACTLY what I needed. It only tells me that I already KNEW exactly what you needed.

However, it DOES tell me a little more about how far you have fallen over the cliff. Can you imagine anyone "relaxing" in that position? Your bodymind sees you exactly as you would be hanging from the twig like Sarge in Beetle Bailey does.

To get back up on the top of the cliff at least temporarily (which may be necessary before you could learn an effective SR) I would suggest getting a deep, total-body, therapeutic massage at least 3 times a week for 3 weeks. By then, you will not only feel better but will KNOW what you have to do to keep this from recurring. Be sure you have read the references in the meantime.

Let us know how you do.

Walt



Follow Ups:


Re: What's wrong with yawning?

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 13, 1999 at 11:20:53:

In Reply to: What's wrong with yawning? posted by Sue Breeding on January 12, 1999 at 23:22:37:

Hi, Sue.

Occasional yawning means nothing.

However, the yawning described here (and the yoga one) are early warning signs of dysautonomia. We ignore those warnings at our peril. As Dr Rush says: If we do not listen to the whispers, we will surely get a chance to cope with the shouts.

Of course, since OUR medical system pays the doctor more the more serious the condition is, there is no financial incentive for any doc to even try to understand the whispers.

Walt




Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson, more info.

Posted by David Ferguson, D.C. on January 13, 1999 at 13:21:03:

In Reply to: Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson, more info. posted by lm on January 13, 1999 at 09:47:46:

In light of this information I would like to change my answer to chiropractic and skilled relaxation. Cervical and thoracic problems can correlate with everything you have mentioned.

Best wishes.


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My appologies

Posted by lm on January 14, 1999 at 16:18:35:

In Reply to: Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson, more info. posted by David Ferguson, D.C. on January 13, 1999 at 13:21:03:

I'm really sorry, I should have included all the information in my original post. I've been dealing with this problem for over a year. The doctor's just shake their heads and send me on my way with no answers. I did ask for a referral to a chiropractor, but doc said he didn't see any need for it. My OD did one adjustment, but doesn't like to do too many. It's really funny because I know he uses chiropractic care for himself.

LM


Follow Ups:


Re: My appologies

Posted by David Ferguson, D.C. on January 14, 1999 at 18:09:06:

In Reply to: My appologies posted by lm on January 14, 1999 at 16:18:35:

No apology necessary.

Funny how Dr.s will do more for themselves or family than patients. I know of an MD who doesn't refer patients to chiropractors but sent his wife to a chiropractor for migranes because he "doesn't want her taking all that medication". Now she is doing fine but he still doesn't refer.

It's sad that we can't put more trust in most MDs than this.



Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson, more info.

Posted by lm on January 15, 1999 at 09:47:41:

In Reply to: Re: urge to yawn: Dr. Stoll and Ferguson, more info. posted by Waalt Stoll on January 13, 1999 at 11:16:02:

Thank you for understanding. You are so right about not being able to relax right now. My counselor agrees that massage would be a great help (why didn't she suggest this?). I made my first appointment for Wednesday next week. I have to pay for this myself because my doctor won't give me the referral I need for my insurance. I will be looking for a new doc today.

LM





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