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Anemia - ???

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Anemia - ???

Posted by Shelly on August 03, 2003 at 00:09:36:

Two and a half years ago I was diagnosed gluten intolerant. I immediately started following a gluten free diet. Just a few months before this diagnosis I had an annual exam and discovered that I was fairly anemic and had bone loss (osteopenia). The later finding that I was gluten intolerant gave me hope that by eating correctly, I would be able to absorb my nutrients and overcome these two problems.

1 1/2 years ago I had my blood retested and sure enough was doing much better. CBC was up to 12 which is the highest ever for me in my adult life (I had taken iron supplements for about 6 months of the year before the test). Two weeks ago I had another annual exam and the accompanying blood tests. I am anemic again (8.5 on the CBC this time). I have not supplemented with iron these past 18 months though. Of course the doc is requesting a more detailed blood test which I am due to take Monday.

I eat a fairly nutritious diet (except chocolate in small amounts 4 - 5 times a week). No alcohol, smoking, coffee. Exercise regularly, do SR once daily. What could I be doing that is preventing me from getting iron from my diet and having my iron count fall so much over 18 months. I am menopausal so I am not losing much blood there. I had a colonoscopy and endoscopy two years ago to determine if there was internal bleeding but none was detected.

So where to go from here? Wait for the doc's diagnosis after this next blood test?

I used to take an iron supplement that was very easy on me, it was non-constipating but I cannot for the life of me remember the manufacturer. Any recommendations of a supplement that is of high quality without the nasty side effects?

Thanks for any and all help.



Re: Anemia - ???

Posted by S.H.A.P.E on August 03, 2003 at 07:35:28:

In Reply to: Anemia - ??? posted by Shelly on August 03, 2003 at 00:09:36:

Take one teaspoon of "Geritol" (found at any drug store) with your breakfast for your anemic problem and start taking a liquid from of "Magnesium" (no calcium like doctors suggest) 3X everyday for one month, then 2X everyday thereafter for bome health! To order the liquid magnesium phone: 1-800-223-1216 and ask for product no. AR-1230 - cost $11.00 * S.H.A.P.E. *



Re: Anemia - ???

Posted by Shelly on August 03, 2003 at 15:02:58:

In Reply to: Re: Anemia - ??? posted by S.H.A.P.E on August 03, 2003 at 07:35:28:

Do you mean that I should stop taking my calcium supplements (I currently take Tri Boron Plus - calcium and magnesium and take 6 capsules a day getting me about 1500mg calcium and about 1000mg magnesium)



Re: Anemia - ???

Posted by
Michele on August 03, 2003 at 17:29:22:

In Reply to: Anemia - ??? posted by Shelly on August 03, 2003 at 00:09:36:

Are you Italian? Greek? ...there are a few nationalities who are commonly anemic...thalocemia...have they tested you for this? I have it - it's very, very common...takingIron for it is moot -It's not an Iron deficiency.



Irish

Posted by Shelly on August 03, 2003 at 19:45:08:

In Reply to: Re: Anemia - ??? posted by Michele on August 03, 2003 at 17:29:22:

I am predominately Irish with a little American Indian thrown in. My mother (Irish) and maternal grandmother (Irish) both have had problems with anemia...wonder if I inherited it.

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Re: Anemia - ???

Posted by peterb on August 03, 2003 at 21:25:38:

In Reply to: Anemia - ??? posted by Shelly on August 03, 2003 at 00:09:36:

since vitamin C is crucial for metabolizing iron, adding 2-3g of ascorbic acid daily might help improve your numbers. You can find this at any health food store. You should probably add a copper cap at bedtime because vit. C will deplete your copper stores; and copper is required to make hemoglobin! also, if you don't eat much red meat, you may need a HEME iron (same as meat) supplement, which is much safer than non-heme forms and absorbs x4 times better. 1-800-223-1216 /product #KA-7146

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Re: Anemia - ??? - to Shelly

Posted by curious on August 04, 2003 at 00:59:06:

In Reply to: Re: Anemia - ??? posted by Shelly on August 03, 2003 at 15:02:58:

I was curious about what SHAPE posted about calcium. Afterall we hear about women needing more calcium I decided to do some research myself. Here is an interesting write up on calcium for women.

The Importance of Organic Calcium vs. Inorganic Calcium: The Women's Body's Ability to Recognize and Utilize Calcium

By: Mark J. Occhipinti, M.S.

Chemistry defines organic as containing carbon or carbon-hydrogen or carbon-carbon bonds. Organic is also defined as a food produced without the use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, additives, anti-biotics, steroids, etc. An example of organic calcium is found in leafy green vegetables grown without pesticides and delivered and packaged without the use of preservatives or additives. Inorganic calcium is that calcium found in foods that have been produced with the use of chemical fertilizers, additives, etc.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A women's body depends upon an intake of calcium each day for the processes of life to take place. Calcium is a critical component for the formation of strong bones and for calcium's role in the contraction and relaxation phase of all muscles within the human body (skeletal, cardiac, and smooth). The medical profession and the media advise us to take in plenty of dairy products every day to assure we are getting enough calcium to build strong bones and teeth. According to some experts higher calcium intake lowers the incidence of osteoporosis, ( a condition of softening of the bones, that is implicated in the deaths of 35,000 Americans each year). 8 However, in countries such as China where animal source protein and calcium intake are very low the incidence of osteoporosis is very low.1 Women are told according to the RDA's (recommended daily allowance) that they need anywhere from 800 mgs. to 1,500 mgs of calcium daily to ward off osteoporosis What we are not told however, is that there are two types of calcium found in nature (organic and inorganic).2 The human body can only recognize and utilize one type of calcium: organic calcium. This bio-available type of calcium found in fruits (many citrus), grains and vegetable. The physical characteristic of organic calcium is the only available form that the body needs and uses.3
Organic calcium is found within the body in the matrix, spongy living core of the bones. Animal dairy products contain inorganic calcium. Which is not recognized, nor utilized by the body. Dr. Stanley Kaplan, MD has found that organic calcium losses were elevated markedly in individuals for 3-4 hours after a meal rich in calcium from dairy and high in protein.4 Independent medical studies, those not funded by the Dairy Council, have concluded that excessive calcium found in the body (in the blood stream ) will not be recognized. Instead, this inorganic calcium from animal sources are removed from the blood and collected in the kidneys. This can lead to the development of kidney stones. The body requires calcium for life and daily bodily repair. Since there is no usable calcium available the brain instructs the bone matrix to release organic calcium into the blood stream. The net result is a loss of calcium from the bone matrix. This loss causes a weakening of the bone resulting in osteoporosis according to Dr. John McDougall, M.D. 5

Dr. Colin Campbell, Ph.D., professor of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, has studied nutritional bio-chemistry for forty years. He is the director of the China- Oxford Cornell Study, which is the largest study of diet and disease in medical history, and supports the necessity of organic calcium intake. He agrees that calcium intake should be from fruit, grains and dark green leafy vegetable sources. The absorption of organic calcium takes place readily from the blood in its vital role of carrying out the metabolic processes in the body. A supplemental form of calcium can be delivered in the form of calcium ascorbate, which delivers the essential organic calcium, with the addition of vitamin C.6

In February 1995, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine lodged a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission against the Dairy industry. The complaint focused on ads for milk and milk products, stating they were deceptive, and imply that calcium in milk is the answer to the bone loss associated with osteoporosis. PCRM holds that calcium intake is important during early childhood, and early adulthood for promoting bone mass growth. PCRM states there are adequate sources of organic calcium from fruits, vegetables and grains to achieve our necessary requirements of usable organic calcium.

In addition, the American Pediatric Association during the last two years has stated that new born to infants to two years of age should not drink milk. This is due in part to the baby's leaky gut that allows for passage of nutrients, and unhealthy animal products to enter the blood stream, causing a high level of allergic reactions. Including ear infections, sinus infections, higher incidence of obesity, diabetes, asthma. 8,9 According to the research conducted by PCRM, milk consumption later in life actually contributes to calcium loss. Research has demonstrated in countries with a lower calcium intake <500 mgs/day also have a significantly lower bone fracture rate, than countries with the highest rates, USA > 1,200 mgs /day.7 PCRM urges women to control calcium loss in adulthood by:
1) Exercise
2) Reducing meat intake
3) Reducing sodium intake
4) Limiting Caffeine and Tobacco use.

Dr. Neal Barnard, M.D., president of PCRM, states that "dairy ads give women a dangerously false sense of security".

CONCLUSION

Excessive calcium intake does not fool hormones into building more bone, any more than delivering an extra load of bricks will make a construction crew build a larger building. Furthermore inorganic calcium promotes a net calcium loss, creating the potential for disaster over time in the unsuspecting individual.




Re: Anemia - ??? (genetic LGS?) Archive in LGS.

Posted by Walt Stoll on August 04, 2003 at 06:29:45:

In Reply to: Anemia - ??? posted by Shelly on August 03, 2003 at 00:09:36:

Hi, Shelly.

First start "Perfect Food" by gardenoflifeusa.com and have them send you a complimentary copy of the book "Patient Heal Thyself" by Jordan Rubin.

Next, start doing your SR at least twice a day. Have you certified it's effectiveness with biofeedback?

Finally, adding the dietary discipline in Beth Loiselle, RD's book "The healing Power of Whole Foods" (800) 870-5378, combined with your gluten elimination, will complete the most potent program yet for boosting your phenome to it's optimum potential.

Let us know what you learn and how you do.

Walt

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Re: Anemia - ??? - to Shelly

Posted by peterb on August 06, 2003 at 12:44:41:

In Reply to: Re: Anemia - ??? - to Shelly posted by curious on August 04, 2003 at 00:59:06:

my own research has led me to the conclusion that 300-400mg calcium daily is ALL anyone needs. More can in fact be dangerous.

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Re: Anemia - ??? about calcium

Posted by bing on August 06, 2003 at 13:58:30:

In Reply to: Re: Anemia - ??? - to Shelly posted by curious on August 04, 2003 at 00:59:06:

Quite true and I agree. I too looked into the calcium issue several years ago and found similar results: diary and supplement pills are not the answer to our body's need for calcium. However, if the source of calcium comes from whole, organic foods, especially plant foods, our body utilizes it much better and need far less than the FDA suggested amount, since the utilization of calcium is closely connected with the amount of magnesium, sillicon /silicon foods, and many other factors/co-factors.

I just wish every consumer is willing to do their own research to find out their own truth about health before taking calcium pills.


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