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Another look at LGS---Archive.

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Another look at LGS---Archive.

Posted by Walt Stoll [9.8] on June 07, 2004 at 06:08:20:

Friends,

FYI.

Walt

Comments?
Misty L. Trepke
http://www.searching-alternatives.com


From: JoAnn Guest

KEYS TO OPTIMUM DIGESTION
The Benefits of Bitter Herbs

Digestion is key to a healthy life for it is through the process of
digestion that our bodies absorb those nutrients that sustain our
lives.

Yet too many people suffer from indigestion because of sedentary
lifestyles, shallow breathing, eating too many depleted and processed
foods or uncomplimentary food combinations, or eating on the go.

To many of us, when the digestive process doesn't work right, it is a
nuisance at best: we feel sluggish, tired and moody, until the
problem becomes serious.

Without proper digestion, the body cannot maintain adequate nutrition
for its cells, or properly eliminate and detoxify.

Undigested or reabsorbed food molecules can cause irritation in the
intestines, weaken the immune system and stimulate allergic
responses.

Fortunately, there are herbal remedies which help prevent heartburn,
and those that stimulate bile flow. You can also choose from enzymes
which help break down food and herbal formulations rich in fiber
which help clear and detoxify the bowels. If improving your
digestion is the last thing on your 'to do' list, think again, and
read on.

THE BENEFITS OF BITTER HERBS
Herbal Medicine Research Report: Volume 2 No. 2
1999

Suzanne Diamond, B.Sc., M.Sc. (Botany)

Herbs traditionally used as 'bitters', such as dandelion leaves and
root, artichoke leaves and flowers, milk thistle seed, Belgian
endive, or chicory and wild lettuce, act to cleanse and rejuvenate
the liver and stimulate bile flow for flushing the gallbladder and
liver.

Our ancestors knew the importance of regularly using a 'bitter', but
modern society has forgotten this - and cultivated lettuce has been
bred to remove all the bitterness.

When 'bitters' are tasted in the mouth, they stimulate the body to
secrete saliva and bile and this aids digestion tremendously and
reduces the likelihood of gallstone formation.

Because bile breaks down fats and bitters stimulate the conversion of
cholesterol into bile acids and increase bile solubility, the more
bitters in the diet, the more bile the body produces and the faster
fat digestion works, cutting cholesterol naturally.

Clinical trials done on artichoke leaf juice and extract for lowering
cholesterol have shown dramatic results within only 6-12 weeks.
Several conventional cholesterol-lowering drugs are based on bile
acid metabolism.

Bitters also stimulate appetite while at the same time cleansing the
body of poisons and toxins and relieving a common condition known as
liver congestion, associated with poor eyesight, skin problems and
many other diseases.

Bitters can immediately improve the health of many individuals whose
diet, high in animal products and sugar, is far too acidified and
whose systems are clogged with bad fats.

Our society's current diet focusses on sweet, sour and salty and has
neglected the very important bitter or alkaline compounds.

This fact is recognized by all long-standing, traditional schools of
medicine such as those from Europe, China and India. Bitters also
strengthen and tone and are great for spring cleaning the liver, the
body's filtration system.

One example of a traditionally used bitter is Blessed Thistle. The
following paragraphs describe this wonderful bitter that was used by
our ancestors.

Blessed Thistle (Cnicus benedictus L.)

Composition
The primary active ingredient of blessed thistle is a bitter tasting
compound called cnicin, a sesquiterpene lactone. The seed contains
several lignans that are phytoestrogen precursors for the key
mammalian lignans: enterolactone and enterodiol which are present in
humans and animals1. Cnicin aids digestion and has considerable
antitumor, cytotoxic, antimicrobial and phytotoxic activity2,3.

Mechanism of action
1) Choleretic and hypolipidemic action: Through its bitter
properties, blessed thistle increases the flow of gastric juices
relieving dyspepsia, indigestion and headaches associated with liver
congestion4.

British and German Pharmacopoeias recognize that 'bitters', including
blessed thistle, stimulate bile flow and cleanse the liver.

Bitter compounds and commercial anti-cholesterolemic drugs such as
cholestyramine and colestipol promote bile acid excretion and
conversion of cholesterol to bile acids5.

In Europe "bitter vegetable drugs" are considered medicinal agents
and used to stimulate appetite, aid digestion, and promote health6.
Studies confirm that bitters increase gastric juice and bile acid
secretions by increasing the flow of saliva through stimulation of
specific receptors on the mucous membrane lining of the mouth7.

2) Tonifying: Traditionally in most countries, including England,
Germany, Russia, China, India and Africa, bitters are used to
strengthen and tonify the body8.

Certain bitter compounds found in the leaves, stems and barks of many
plants such as the oligomeric proanthocyanidins concentrated in pine
bark and grape seed, have been shown to improve blood circulation by
binding to the membranes of blood vessels and capillaries, repairing
collagen and elastin and preventing their degradation by enzymes and
free radicals, thereby strengthening the vascular system9.

3) Antibiotic activity: Blessed thistle extracts have anti-bacterial
activity. Research on blessed thistle herb has demonstrated
antibiotic properties for: 1) cnicin10, 2) the essential oil which
includes n-paraffin (C-9 - C-13), aromatic aldehydes (cinnamaldehyde,
benzaldehyde, cuminaldehyde) and monoterpenes (citronellol, fenchone,
p-cymene and others), and 3) the polyacetylenes contained in the
herb. The essential oil has bacteriostatic action against
Staphylococcus aureus, S. faecalis, but not E. coli.


References:

1. Stitch etal. Occurrence of lignans, enterolactone and enterodiol
in man and animal species. Nature. 1980; 287: 238.

2. Duke J; Handbook of Biologically Active Phytochemicals and their
Activities. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 1991: 32.

3. Rodriguez etal. Biological activities of sesquiterpene lactones.
Phytochemistry. 1976; 15: 1573-1580.

4. Bradley PRe; British Herbal Compendium. Volume 1, A handbook of
scientific information on widely used plant drugs. Holy Thistle.
Bournemouth, Dorset: British Herbal Medicine Association; 1992.

5. Hardman eae; Goodman and Gilmans "The Pharmacological Basis of
Therapeutics. 9th ed. McGraw-Hill Health Professions Division; 1996.

6. Weiss RF; Herbal Medicine. Translated from the 6th German edition
of Lehrbuch der Phytotherapie by A.R. Meuss, FIL, MITI. Beaconsfield,
Bucks, England: Beaconsfield Publishers, Ltd.; 1988.

7. Schneider G, Lachner I. A contribution to analytics and
pharmacology of cnicin. Planta Medica. 1987; 53: 247.

8. European Scientific Cooperative on Phytotherapy; Wormwood,
Dandelion, Gentian. Execter, U.K.: ESCOP Secretariat Argyle House;
1997.

9. Facino ea. Free radical scavenging action and anti-enzyme
activities of procyanidines from Vitis vinifera. Arzneim-Foprusch.
Drug Res. 1994; 44: 592-601.

10. Vanhaelen-Fastre R, Vanhaelen M. Antibiotic and cytotoxic
activity of cnicin and of its hydrolysis products. Chemical
structure - biological activity relationship. Planta Medica. 1976;
29: 179-189.

http://www.florahealth.com/flora/home/USA/HealthInformation/articles/




A type of bitters to try?

Posted by Tabby [6.308] on June 07, 2004 at 08:57:39:

In Reply to: Another look at LGS---Archive. posted by Walt Stoll [9.8] on June 07, 2004 at 06:08:20:

Can anyone give me a suggestion on one to try? I've seen several at my local HFS. Some are labelled "chinese", other's "Swedish"....... Thanks!!

Tab



Re: A type of bitters to try?

Posted by PhillyLady [1906.913] on June 07, 2004 at 09:44:53:

In Reply to: A type of bitters to try? posted by Tabby [6.308] on June 07, 2004 at 08:57:39:

Hi Tabby:

Swedish Bitters is a good one to take. Not familiar with Chinese Bitters.

Thanks for reminding me since I haven't taken mine in several weeks. Time to get back on track with my health:-)



Re: A type of bitters to try?

Posted by PhillyLady [1906.913] on June 07, 2004 at 09:47:17:

In Reply to: Re: A type of bitters to try? posted by PhillyLady [1906.913] on June 07, 2004 at 09:44:53:

Oops! Here's the site: www.swedishbitters.com




THANK YOU TO Dr. Stoll & sending blessings this day.. Sedona nmi

Posted by Sedona [1884.81] on June 07, 2004 at 10:37:46:

In Reply to: Another look at LGS---Archive. posted by Walt Stoll [9.8] on June 07, 2004 at 06:08:20:

kk

Follow Ups:


Thanks!

Posted by Tabby [6.308] on June 07, 2004 at 11:02:50:

In Reply to: Re: A type of bitters to try? posted by PhillyLady [1906.913] on June 07, 2004 at 09:47:17:

Thank you for the interesting website!

Tab

Follow Ups:


Re: A type of bitters to try?

Posted by gabriella [87.890] on June 07, 2004 at 11:55:03:

In Reply to: Re: A type of bitters to try? posted by PhillyLady [1906.913] on June 07, 2004 at 09:44:53:

Hi Philly,

I was wondering if you would mind sharing how and when you take your bitters? How much, take it with anything, and take it before, during, or after eating; and how much time before, during, or after? Do you take it for complete meals only?


Thanks,
gabriella



Re: A type of bitters to try?

Posted by PhillyLady [1906.913] on June 07, 2004 at 12:20:22:

In Reply to: Re: A type of bitters to try? posted by gabriella [87.890] on June 07, 2004 at 11:55:03:

Hi Gabriella:

When I take Swedish Bitters, I take two tablespoons of it in a small glass of water. I take it on an empty stomach before bed. It tastes bitter and awful, but strangely enough, people who take it don't mind the taste. You become accustomed to it and look forward to it. It's like getting a "rough" massage. You know you'll take the first few seconds of pain because there are some good feelings at the end:-)

It gives me a lighter feeling in the stomach area the next day and more energy. I guess it's somewhat of a cleansing and detoxifying tonic. The liver loves it!

My problem is that I've got so many remedies around the house, a small laboratory almost (smile), that I forget to take many of them.



Re: A type of bitters to try?

Posted by gabriella [87.890] on June 07, 2004 at 13:22:10:

In Reply to: Re: A type of bitters to try? posted by PhillyLady [1906.913] on June 07, 2004 at 12:20:22:

Hi Philly,

Thanks for your response. Is that what they recommend, before bedtime? I've always heard people say to take them about 20 minutes before eating. But maybe the bitters and the people differ, and one size doesn't fit all. It works for you and that's what counts. And I bet it does cleanse your liver all night long!

I'm not sure what went wrong when I used them before, but I was buying little viles of Gentian from a health food store that had no knowledge or interest whatsoever. It had some alcohol in it. Anyway, after some time I had developed unbearable heartburn so I stopped.

I do know I need a digestive aid right now, and have been discussing different ones on the board here with various people. I will try yours, try it at bedtime, and see how things go. A personal recommendation based on experience is always good.


gabriella
p.s. good luck on your doctor's appointment today. Oh and maybe one day you'll organize your home laboratory, I bet it's extremely interesting.



Re: A type of bitters to try?

Posted by PhillyLady [1906.913] on June 07, 2004 at 14:00:22:

In Reply to: Re: A type of bitters to try? posted by gabriella [87.890] on June 07, 2004 at 13:22:10:

Hi Gabriella:

Actually, my ENT appointment is tomorrow morning. It should be loads of fun:-)

I should tell you that the brand of Swedish Bitters I prefer comes from "NatureWorks", and contains alcohol. My instincts tell me that this is the best form for me. But someone else may require the kind without alcohol.

Now, I wasn't aware that gentian was used as a digestive aid. Is that why you were taking it? I know years ago, mothers used to "paint" their children's throats with a solution of Gentian Violet. It acted as a sort of antiseptic and left the inside of the throat slightly purple.

Speaking of my home lab, a little while ago I was cleaning out some containers in my kitchen and found some forgotten dried herbs which I could no longer recognized, so I ended up throwing them out. Of course, a real herbalist would have recognized them instantly. Next time I'll label them.




Re: A type of bitters to try?

Posted by Naya [120.295] on June 07, 2004 at 14:47:09:

In Reply to: Re: A type of bitters to try? posted by PhillyLady [1906.913] on June 07, 2004 at 14:00:22:

Hi Phillylady! Do you know if there is a healing crisis if one starts taking bitters? Anything like a die-off reaction? I'm considering trying them again, but I don't remember how I reacted when I tried them before. It's been years.

Thanks,
Naya

Follow Ups:


Re: A type of bitters to try?

Posted by gabriella [180.890] on June 07, 2004 at 15:39:28:

In Reply to: Re: A type of bitters to try? posted by PhillyLady [1906.913] on June 07, 2004 at 14:00:22:

Hi Philly,

Oops, well, I guess I was in the general ballpark about the doctor's. Yeah, sometimes it's no fun to go at all, but it sounds as though you've been pretty uncomfortable lately. What did you think of Walt's diagnosis of dysautonomia and it's connection with your sinus problem?
__________

Anyway, I was told that bitters with some alcohol is best because it transports into one's system faster. I don't know if that was what was irritating me or not.

__________

"Now, I wasn't aware that gentian was used as a digestive aid. Is that why you were taking it?"

I thought I read that it was supposed to be such, and yes that's why I took it. That's interesting that it's considered an antiseptic. If the form I took was then I can only imagine a clean but purple liver!

_____________

"Of course, a real herbalist would have recognized them instantly".

Don't feel too bad though, she might have still thrown them out...

Follow Ups:


[ Leaky Gut Syndrome Archive ]
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