Leaky Gut Syndrome archives

How common is protein deficiency with candida?

Posted by Mary Jackson on November 28, 1998 at 00:28:31:

Hi Walt,

I was reading in The Yeast Syndrome by John Parks Trowbridge and Morton Walker that candida situations require greater amounts of protein and that the protein that is absorbed is often not completely broken down. Do you think blood tests for albumin levels are in order (I also read on the Internet about a "prealbumin" test)?

It seems to me that there is some sort of thermal regulation problem involved with the digestive "furnace" not working properly--low brown fat, thyroid problem, sodium-potassium pump defect, or mineral deficiency (iron and copper lack affects brown adipose tissue functioning). I was trying to do research on thermogenesis. I read an article on Medline about lower brown fat incidences creating higher insulin resistance and higher blood glucose interestingly enough. Any ideas whether this sort of thing would be involved with candida? Mary J.


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Re: How common is protein deficiency with candida?

Posted by Walt Stoll on November 29, 1998 at 09:46:15:

In Reply to: How common is protein deficiency with candida? posted by Mary Jackson on November 28, 1998 at 00:28:31:

Dear Mary,

I have real trouble getting very excited about this kind of information. These are "tips of the iceberg" that only serve to distract people from where they should be putting their efforts. They are easier to understand and a lot easier to address but they are results of the problem NOT causes.

In the end, no matter how much we "struggle on the hook" we still will have to face the causes & deal with them.

Of course, there is a "protein problem" and of course we are absorbing incompletely digested proteins (peptides) because of the LGS that HAS to be present before anyone can get C-RS. This is at least the basis for 95% of all hypersensitivities-----------just to mention one problem. This is what I have been talking about for years on this very BB.

The candida aggravates the LGS by increasing leakage and the hypersensitivity by focussing the immune system where the peptides leak.

I have no doubt that all these things may be factors in production of symptoms. However, dealing with any of them will never resolve the problem.

You will see the "medline" stuff desperately trying to focus attention on the "tips" because that will increase the things we practitioners of the allopathic paradigm monopoly can treat without actually dealing with the causes. Another basis for a lifetime annuity for the doc.

Thanks for bringing it up. I hope everyone will look at this in a way that serves health rather than the "system" as it is.

Happy Holidays to you & yours!

Walt



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Re: How common is protein deficiency with candida?

Posted by Mary Jackson on November 29, 1998 at 17:11:41:

In Reply to: Re: How common is protein deficiency with candida? posted by Walt Stoll on November 29, 1998 at 09:46:15:

Hi Walt,

It probably seems like I keep harping on the same crud, but I am getting closer and closer to what "went wrong" with diabetic kids. It would be great if a child's protein status could be assessed, and if hypoproteinemia is present then there could be fluid disorder which could also be adjusted. I read about a case of this type where the body fluid situation was ameliorated (something about "colloids") in a protein deficiency. I'm not sure what the fluid problem consists of (whether it is water retention or whether it is "third spacing" where fluid leaks where it should not go or both) or how prevalent it is. Dietary means such as "Sugarbusters" would help the whole scenario. I'm betting that there is a "status quo" as the reason why juvenile diabetics don't heal their pancreases, not that they are irrevocably broken.

BTW, do you know if lactobacilli leak through the intestinal walls in a severe case of leaky gut and form an infection outlet anywhere? A guy I know thinks he has one! Candida may serve some purpose in the mechanics of the body disposing of undigested food. Since I have only taken Introduction to Microbiology and Public Health and Sanitation I need people to tell me what's up from a scientific standpoint (I can "hack flack"!). Mary J.


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Re: How common is protein deficiency with candida?

Posted by Walt Stoll on November 30, 1998 at 10:08:37:

In Reply to: Re: How common is protein deficiency with candida? posted by Mary Jackson on November 29, 1998 at 17:11:41:

Hi Mary.

I have never heard of lactobacilli causing any problem in the body. I would be interested in hearing more about it.

Certainly, candida would "eat" stuff not digested well enough (only carbohydrates) but that is the whole problem, isn't it? We need to get rid of the LGS, that is not digesting stuff well, to finally get rid of the candida.

Walt



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Intestinal Flora

Posted by Mary Jackson on December 01, 1998 at 10:39:34:

In Reply to: Re: How common is protein deficiency with candida? posted by Walt Stoll on November 30, 1998 at 10:08:37:

Hi Walt,

I think the guy with the infection needs a culture. I can't describe it on the BB--it's gross. A person who was quoted on the intestinal health list consumed a great deal of homemade yogurt over a period of 6 months and healed himself 95% of some problem he had. It supposedly has a trillion lactobacilli per quart (much more than probiotic capsules).
The homemade variety is better than commercial (I forget exactly why but Elaine Gottschall of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet explains it). I think a high intake of the beneficial flora over a period of time could be an evolving process. One of my contacts said you should "clean and rebuild" before trying to attach the stuff to the intestinal walls, but maybe things will "right" themselves eventually.

An old booklet I have called Acidophilus and Colon Health by Daniel Webster recommends bifidus colonic implants. He says that the acidophilus doesn't take with all humans, but bifidus will. Bulgaricus doesn't since it's animal flora.
I'm not greatly familiar with soil-based organisms (sbo's) and the other more recent flora discoveries. Webster recommends Topfer Eugalan Forte for the bifidus. It's a German product (think it cost about $14 as I recall?)
If anyone knows of anything recommendable in this regard, please respond! Mary J.


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Biotin?

Posted by Mary Jackson on December 01, 1998 at 11:02:44:

In Reply to: Intestinal Flora posted by Mary Jackson on December 01, 1998 at 10:39:34:

P.S. Trowbridge recommends an intake of biotin for preventing the fungal form of candida from developing. I think I'm accruing the energy to battle the "beast" ("yeast is the beast"). MJ


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Re: Biotin?

Posted by Walt Stoll on December 02, 1998 at 10:04:57:

In Reply to: Biotin? posted by Mary Jackson on December 01, 1998 at 11:02:44:

Hi, Mary.

I can remember teaching the "biotin connection" about 15 years ago. It does help. However, in the long run, the stuff we have been talking about, regarding the LGS, is MUCH more important.

Also, rebuilding the normal ecology of the gut IS critical (We have discussed that many times as it is part of correcting the LGS.). This is what the 4-R program from Jeff Bland is all about. Unfortunately, his program has a lot of sugar in it and most people cannot tolerate that in the beginning of treating C-RS.

As Gilda Radner was fond of saying: "It's always something!"

Walt




Re: Intestinal Flora

Posted by Walt Stoll on December 02, 1998 at 10:11:14:

In Reply to: Intestinal Flora posted by Mary Jackson on December 01, 1998 at 10:39:34:

Dear Mary,

I would REALLY like to see the laboratory colony count for this homemade yogurt. I know it is "better". However, I seriously doubt that it has this many bacteria in it. The research I have seen shows about 10,000 organisms per 1/2 cup serving (Who ever stops with 1/2 cup yogurt???).

The good commercial grade of acidophilus/bifidus has to have at least 6,000,000,000 organisms per dose.
I am open to being educated about this. At that level of organism concentration, it would be a LOT better to "make your own". You would need an independent local lab to do the colony count. It would cost you about $300.

Walt



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Re: Intestinal Flora

Posted by Mary Jackson on December 03, 1998 at 13:36:43:

In Reply to: Re: Intestinal Flora posted by Walt Stoll on December 02, 1998 at 10:11:14:

Hi Walt,

I was doing some "mental midgetry" here just taking for granted the figures on the beneficial flora. I need to know more. Thanks for the updated info. on the biotin.
Here's a site describing the German bifidus products: http://www.webhealth.com/bifidus.html. I may try one of these products and will look and see how many organisms they claim to have. I really don't have a desire to consume tons of yogurt--maybe it's because dairy is considered to be "damp-mucous-y". I was reading that on the http://www.oxytherapy.com site in their listserv archives. Some food for thought on that site! Mary J.
P.S. Enjoyed hearing about your therapeutic dog.



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