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A good explanation of LGS REFERENCE

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A good explanation of LGS

Posted by Webster [215.1351] on December 13, 2005 at 08:13:45:

DEFINITION – LEAKY GUT SYNDROME
A progressive and accumulative microtrauma to the gastric mucosa, compromising gut cellular integrity,
inducing increased gut wall permeability with subsequent penetration of partially digested protein
macromolecules and other microorganisms through gut/blood barrior into systemic circulation.
In other words, Leaky Gut Syndrome is an inability of the gastric lining to keep undigested food or
potentially pathogenic organisms from absorbing into the blood stream. Abnormally large spaces
develop between the cell walls of the gut, allowing unwanted material to pass through. The gut becomes
“leaky” in the sense that bacteria, parasites, viruses, fungi and their metabolic byproducts, undigested protein, fat and waste pass through a hyperpermeable, porous or “leaky” intestinal wall and are absorbed into the bloodstream. This leads to a blood antibody reaction involving IgG4 defense cells. The invading proteins form new cells, called ‘Circulating Immune Complexes’ or CIC’s.These cell complexes,neutralized in a healthy person, are responsible for type I and type II delayed food allergies. Individuals with Leaky Gut Syndrome experience a gradual accumulation of these CIC’s, eventually reaching an intolerable level within the circulation. When the system becomes saturated with CIC’s, the blood deposits these cells in soft tissues and joints throughout the body. Local inflammations occur at the deposit sites of CIC’s, resulting in pain and swelling. The deposit sites often correspond to the eighteen (18) fibromyalgia tender points (16 have external pressure points), in addition to various joints in the body. This
is just a part of the far reaching disease we call Leaky Gut Syndrome.

For another 31 pages of info go here: www.johnsondrugs.com/docs/gut.pdf



Re: A good explanation of LGS (ARCHIVE.)

Posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on December 13, 2005 at 14:28:29:

In Reply to: A good explanation of LGS posted by Webster [215.1351] on December 13, 2005 at 08:13:45:

Thanks, Webster.

Good stuff!

Walt

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Re: A good explanation of LGS

Posted by Mike [3234.1599] on December 13, 2005 at 22:52:10:

In Reply to: A good explanation of LGS posted by Webster [215.1351] on December 13, 2005 at 08:13:45:

"These cell complexes,neutralized in a healthy person,"

Exactly what is it, in a healthy person, that neutralizes these cell complexes?



Re: A good explanation of LGS

Posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on December 14, 2005 at 06:26:20:

In Reply to: Re: A good explanation of LGS posted by Mike [3234.1599] on December 13, 2005 at 22:52:10:

Mike,

Normal digestion breaks proteins down in to amino acids which are harmless. Poorly digested proteins leave behind a lot of peptides which must not get into the blood stream.

Hope this helps.

Walt



Re: A good explanation of LGS

Posted by R. [4746.2395] on December 14, 2005 at 22:47:22:

In Reply to: Re: A good explanation of LGS posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on December 14, 2005 at 06:26:20:

Normal digestion breaks proteins down in to amino acids which are harmless.

Someone in a Yahoo group I have subscribed to who studied physiology, etc. has written that not all proteins are broken down to amino acids as a part of normal digestion. She said that actually a very large percentage is proteins are broken down to peptides that are absorbed into the blood for further processing. This is supposed to be the freshest knowledge.

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Re: A good explanation of LGS

Posted by R. [4746.2395] on December 14, 2005 at 22:50:38:

In Reply to: Re: A good explanation of LGS posted by Mike [3234.1599] on December 13, 2005 at 22:52:10:

Probably systemic protein digesting enzymes. Wobenzym and other products are based on this.

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