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Emotional Healing through the Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy

Posted by Happygal on November 09, 2003 at 21:47:47:

Walt, I have typed out this article with the hope that you will include it in the archives. It describes the healing method known as "The Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy" which I so often suggest that people on the BB seek out to help work through emotional issues. It has been immensely valuable in my own healing, and now I use it as well in my own practice to help others heal. Thanks and best wishes, Happygal


The Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy by Meg Warden, CHT, CRS.

Theory: "Hakomi" is a Hopi Indian word that means "who are you" or "how do you stand in relation to these many realms." Who we are and how we relate to the world can be partly understood through our "core material." Core material consists of the memories, feelings and beliefs that shape our perceptions, attitudes and behaviors. Our core material develops during our formative years. It reflects our experiences of childhood and our coping strategies. We all have core material around major themes:

- safety and belonging
- support, love and appreciation
- freedom and responsibility
- openness and honesty
- control, power, sexuality, membership, and the social and cultural rules

Core material is often not conscious until we intentionally explore it. It influences how we functioned in our families and childhoods. It forms a blueprint for our creating similar relationships and experiences in adulthood. Often it limits the expression of our authentic being. And authenticity is fundamental to physical, emotional and spiritual well-being.

Through self-study, core material may be discovered and processed for the purpose of transformation. When core material becomes conscious, we can make new choices and have new experiences. We can change how we experience both the world and others.

Practice: Hakomi Method uses an experimental attitude to explore experience and meaning. It is slow, gentle and supportive. Awareness deepens and understanding unfolds in a climate of trust and curiosity. Healing is accomplished through non-judgmental discovery, compassionate contact and intuitive integration. In Hakomi, present experience is studied in "mindfulness." This is a quiet state of consciousness that allows us to observe internal experiences. In mindfulness, core material is evoked through statements, movements, touch and other kinds of little experiments. Emotions, core beliefs, and memories often emerge. Once conscious, we can work with our core material and change how we organize our experiences. Through Hakomi, we bring to light what has been hidden, and as we do, we free ourselves from limitations of the past.

Principles: The Hakomi Method is deeply influenced by Buddhism and is guided by five principles.

- Mindfulness: Mindfulness allows us to see beyond habitual thoughts and behaviors to deeper truths within us. Mindfulness helps us uncover our compassion, wisdom and authentic presence.

- Unity: Each of us is a whole living system comprised of essential parts. We each participate in larger systems. All parts and systems are connected, interdependent and rely upon communication. Hakomi helps to improve essential communication.

- Organicity: Each living system is self-directing and self-correcting. We have inner wisdom and freedom of choice. Hakomi therapists trust the natural unfolding process of an individual's inner work.

- Mind-Body Holism: Our minds and bodies reflect the beliefs we hold about ourselves and about the world. Our beliefs determine how we perceive or organize our experiences. Realizing our beliefs is the first step in transformative change.

- Non-Violence: Safety is essential for self-exploration. When defenses or resistance appear, they indicate a need for greater safety. Through respecting and appreciating their wisdom, defenses actually support the healing process of inner work.

Meg Warden is a Certified Hakomi Therapist and a Certified Rubenfeld Synergist. In her private practice, she works with people who are recovering from depression, trauma, chronic pain, and grief. She also facilitates The Work of Byron Katie and leads A Course In Miracles study groups. For more information, go to her website: www.megwarden.com or contact her at 970-377-6373. Other Hakomi therapists across the nation are listed in the website directory at www.hakomiinstitute.com. This article was taken from the September-October 2003 issue of The Healing Path Community Magazine, 305 W. Magnolia, PMB 26-4, Fort Colins, CO 80521 970-498-4073, www.healingpath.com.



Emotional Healing: The Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy (Archive.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on November 10, 2003 at 08:33:58:

In Reply to: Emotional Healing through the Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy posted by Happygal on November 09, 2003 at 21:47:47:

Thanks, Happygal.

Hope archiving this in Wellness is where you think it should go.

Namaste`

Walt



Re: Emotional Healing through the Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy

Posted by Carol D. on November 10, 2003 at 10:44:05:

In Reply to: Emotional Healing through the Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy posted by Happygal on November 09, 2003 at 21:47:47:

Thanks for the info. Do you happen to know of any similar methods? There are no Hakomi practitioners within hundreds of miles of me.

Also, just a quick correction to the web address: www.hakomiinstitute.com. Link below.



Re: Emotional Healing through the Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy

Posted by Happygal on November 10, 2003 at 23:15:13:

In Reply to: Re: Emotional Healing through the Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy posted by Carol D. on November 10, 2003 at 10:44:05:

Hi Carol D.

Thanks for the link correction.

An offshoot of Hakomi (which some feel has evolved beyond what Hakomi does) is called sensorimotor psychotherapy. (It was originally called Hakomi Integrative Somatics). Here's the contact info:

Sensorimotor Psychotherapy
PO Box 19438
Boulder, CO 80308
303-447-3290
sensorimotorpsychotherapy.org
office@sensorimotorpsychotherapy.org

Another useful method is called Somatic Experiencing. It is mostly used for trauma resolution. Try www.traumahealing.com. They have a practitioner registry.

There are several other methods of "body-centered psychotherapy" available. You might do a search for that exact term and see what turns up.

"Focusing" is an older, somewhat similar but less developed technique.

Another thing I would look for in the advertisments of prospective therapists is a "client-centered approach."

It is usually a good idea to interview several therapists on the phone first, then in person to see which one you feel most comfortable with. Discuss fees, ask about the therapist's philosophy, etc. If you ask most will let you meet them for no charge.

Best wishes,
Happygal


Follow Ups:


Re: Emotional Healing: The Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy (Archive.)

Posted by Happygal on November 10, 2003 at 23:18:56:

In Reply to: Emotional Healing: The Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy (Archive.) posted by Walt Stoll on November 10, 2003 at 08:33:58:

Thanks, Walt.

Archiving it under "wellness" is one option.

I was also thinking, since our book has a chapter called "Healing Mind, Emotions, and Spirit," if you made an archive with a similar (not necessarily the exact same) title, people who read our book and then come to the website would easily be able to find and access the information in the archives. How about an archive called "Emotional-mental healing"? Or perhaps under "psychotherapy" or "counseling" or something like that. What do you think? Just some ideas.

Namaste`
Happygal



Re: Emotional Healing: The Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy (Archive.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on November 11, 2003 at 10:46:31:

In Reply to: Re: Emotional Healing: The Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy (Archive.) posted by Happygal on November 10, 2003 at 23:18:56:

Thanks, Happygal.

Probably a good idea. I have been avoiding adding any new archives since the list is already so long. Perhaps I should not worry so much about that.

Walt

Follow Ups:


Re: Emotional Healing through the Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy

Posted by Nutmeg on November 11, 2003 at 12:09:56:

In Reply to: Re: Emotional Healing through the Hakomi Method of Body-Centered Psychotherapy posted by Carol D. on November 10, 2003 at 10:44:05:

Hi Carol,

I would have to travel 150-200 miles for these types of somatic counseling/therapy as well.

I've been having success with a technique called neuro emotional therapy (NET) for relieving trauma-induced physical ailments that I have been unable to heal from completely. Practitioners of NET include chiropractors, doctors, and psychotherapists. I only have to drive 55 miles for that ;-) Maybe you would have luck finding someone in your area, since this seems to be more widespread.

The technique utilizes muscle testing to identify sources of trauma and how and where that trauma is stored in the body. Through a series of statements to indicate healing intent and physical manipulation (not a chiropractic adjustment, just a series of thumps on the back combined with phrases and breathing), the blockages to healing are released.

I've been seeing a chiropractor for this for about 7 weeks now and have had noticeable changes in my energy level, pain level, a tiny improvement in sleep, and less depression, and the doctor has noticed definite changes in the character of my muscle tissues. Before this, I worked extensively for a year on healing my emotions and spirit from the traumas once I realized what they had done to me, working with a counselor/hypnotherapist, doing a lot of personal growth and development, working with a psychic/spiritual healer, and much more. I don't know what your situation is, but the better you know yourself and your issues, the better NET works. Still, it has uncovered some great surprises for me that I continue to process and heal from.

Here's a link www.netmindbody.com

Wishing you the best,
Nutmeg

Follow Ups:


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