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Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc.

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Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc.

Posted by Maz on September 18, 2003 at 05:43:34:

Hi,

I understand when milk is pasteurised the natural enzymes in the milk are lost. Is anything else lost and also are there any supplements which match what is lost from the milk? Thanks.



Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc.

Posted by GG on September 18, 2003 at 09:33:40:

In Reply to: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. posted by Maz on September 18, 2003 at 05:43:34:

Several amino acids are denatured during the process of psturization and the Wulzen Factor is lost. Check out the Weston Price site for more info.

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Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. (Archive.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on September 19, 2003 at 05:54:35:

In Reply to: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. posted by Maz on September 18, 2003 at 05:43:34:

Hi,Maz.

The "ultrapastuerization" currently being employed certainly changes a lot more than regular pastuerization but no one seem to be interested in doing research in what this does to people who ingest it over time.

We are all unknowing participants in a massive research project; the outcome of which will not be known for at least decades.

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Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc.

Posted by berji on September 19, 2003 at 13:36:57:

In Reply to: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. posted by Maz on September 18, 2003 at 05:43:34:

I have read before that a calf will get very sickly if fed pasteurised milk. Kind of scary, huh?

My sister and her husband only drink raw milk. They have to get it illegally in Wisconsin. It is illegal to sell it unless the buyers are part owners of the farm.

We are so ingrained to think that pasteurised is better. Whenever I mention to anyone that my sister and her family drink raw milk, people freak out. "They will get sick!!!" they say. I say "not if the cows are healthy."

I am allergic to milk personally, otherwise, I would investigate as to how I could get it.

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Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc.

Posted by R. on September 19, 2003 at 15:11:54:

In Reply to: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. posted by Maz on September 18, 2003 at 05:43:34:

I have read before that a calf will get very sickly if fed pasteurised milk. Kind of scary, huh?

This has been discussed in the native-nutrition yahoo group some time ago, and the consensus was that that wasn't really as Weston Price Foundation stated.



Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc.

Posted by Wondering on September 19, 2003 at 17:56:38:

In Reply to: Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. posted by R. on September 19, 2003 at 15:11:54:

I'm wondering how a human baby would do if its mother's milk was extracted into dirty milking machines and vats, was ultra-pasturized to kill the germs from the unsanitary conditions(which is done with microwaves, by the way - even pasturization is done with microwaves in some facilities), stored in plastic for a week or two and then served cold. And that's hoping that its mother was not pumped full of hormornes to stimulate milk production artificially. MMMM, MMMM Good, huh? Nutritious? I really don't think so.

I think that "concensus" you speak of is a little off and wonder how it was arrived at. Empirical data? Just something to think about.



Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc.

Posted by R. on September 19, 2003 at 19:31:37:

In Reply to: Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. posted by Wondering on September 19, 2003 at 17:56:38:

I think that "concensus" you speak of is a little off and wonder how it was arrived at. Empirical data?

Yes, empirical (derived from experiment and observation) data.

ultra-pasturized to kill the germs from the unsanitary conditions

The germs in milk don't come from unsanitary conditions. Germs are everywhere. Milk is pasteurized out of fear.



Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. (Archive.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on September 20, 2003 at 07:52:43:

In Reply to: Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. posted by R. on September 19, 2003 at 19:31:37:

Thanks, R.

Milk, as it comes from the cow is supposed to be sterile as is urine and the inside of a healthy egg. If the cow's udder has an infection (mastitis) THEN, there may be bacteria in the milk. IF the cow has TB or Brucellosis, there may be those bacteria in the milk. This is why any certified dairy has regular inspections for the presence of any disease in the herd--and why dairy cows are vaccinated against these conditions. All bacteria in the milk of healthy cows comes from handling.

Pastuerization destroys any of the antibodies that a cow's milk is supposed to be delivering to the calf and THAT is why calves do not do well on pastuerized milk (among other things).

Walt



Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. (Archive.)

Posted by R. on September 20, 2003 at 17:10:22:

In Reply to: Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. (Archive.) posted by Walt Stoll on September 20, 2003 at 07:52:43:

Ok, if what you said is right (that milk is supposed to be sterile), then milk isn't supposed to be consumed in sterile conditions. It's consumed with all germs that are present on the udder. Therefore, I resent the use of the word unsanitary, which would justify killing the microbes. We have evolved in the environment full of germs. Along with potential pathogens we get beneficial germs that often disallow the pathogens to become dominant strains. Even acidophilus is known to cause problems when there's overgrowth of it.



Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. (Archive.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on September 21, 2003 at 07:30:31:

In Reply to: Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. (Archive.) posted by R. on September 20, 2003 at 17:10:22:

Hi, R.

The problem is really in the way the dairy farmer prepares the udder of the cow, stores the milk, ships it, how it is handled once it gets to the processor and thereafter to the consumer. Multiplication of bacteria during that process is why pastuerization is necessary. However, if one has a friendly farmer, from whom they can get the milk direct, all this is avoided.

There is ample evidence that routine exposure to germs is one of the main ways humans develop a healthy immune system. However, the above process has never existed in human experience until the last 100 years.

Recall the pictures of the milk maids peddling their wares just a few hours after the milk was milked, directly to the doors of the consumers!

Hope this helps.

Walt



Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. (Archive.)

Posted by R. on September 27, 2003 at 00:42:01:

In Reply to: Re: Raw Milk and Loss of Enzymes etc. (Archive.) posted by Walt Stoll on September 21, 2003 at 07:30:31:

The problem is really in the way the dairy farmer prepares the udder of the cow, stores the milk, ships it, how it is handled once it gets to the processor and thereafter to the consumer. Multiplication of bacteria during that process is why pastuerization is necessary.

the above process has never existed in human experience until the last 100 years.

I don't think it matters that this particular process didn't exist until the last 100 years because I doubt any microbes that humans hadn't encountered before are introduced to milk.

You wrote the the rest of what I wanted to say (http://askwaltstollmd.com/wwwboard/messages/196883.shtml)

Weston Price Foundation maintains that raw milk is safer than pasteurized. See

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