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Alternatives to Butter and Margarine?

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Alternatives to Butter and Margarine?

Posted by
Colby on October 30, 2001 at 13:06:28:

Since Dairy products are very harmful and not part of my diet, what alternatives are there to butter or even margarine?

-Colby



Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine?

Posted by Marie Alise on October 30, 2001 at 13:38:46:

In Reply to: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? posted by Colby on October 30, 2001 at 13:06:28:

Colby,

I use Coconut Butter from Omega Nutrition. It is organic, unhydrogenated(cold-pressed) & contains 50% Lauric Acid. Lauric Acid not only is a medium chain fatty acid which quickly converts to energy rather store as fat in adipose tissue, but it also is a natural antibacterial.

It doesn't taste "coconutty?", and you can heat it to act as an oil for sauteing(but then you lose the antibacterial).

This sounds like an ad, but I really like it. Some folks even take it medicinally-tablespoon or two a day. Do a search on Google!

Btw, I don't drink milk or eat ice cream, but I love butter and it supplies many micronutrients.

You probably know this, but just in case--to eat saturated fats so they don't become enemies in your system, try to keep them down to 10% total caloric intake and it's vital to include the Omega 3's--fish oil supplements are good. Or even a precurser like Black Current Seed oil. The Omega's & mono's like Olive Oil should be consumed at abt a 20% of daily intake. All these fats are essential for nerve transmission, brain function & the synthesis of those happy hormones:) Can you tell I'm studying to become a Certified Nutritionist???

"Smart Fats" by Michael A. Schmidt is a great book to learn more.

Cheers,
MA



Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine?

Posted by Margie on October 30, 2001 at 15:54:19:

In Reply to: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? posted by Colby on October 30, 2001 at 13:06:28:

You don't need an alternative to butter, because it's good for you. As Marie says, it contains many micronutrients. And saturated fats are not the enemy.

check out this site:
www.westonaprice.org

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Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine?

Posted by kmd on October 30, 2001 at 15:54:36:

In Reply to: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? posted by Colby on October 30, 2001 at 13:06:28:

Butter is supposed to be the healthiest, but for a non-dairy spread that tastes good we like Nucoa.



Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine?

Posted by Vince F on October 30, 2001 at 16:37:55:

In Reply to: Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? posted by kmd on October 30, 2001 at 15:54:36:

I like butter and think it is better than margarine in
every way. Used to be they said it had No nutrition but
that is changing. I use less than I used to and that could
be because of less of a need.

VF

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Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine?

Posted by R. on October 30, 2001 at 16:45:51:

In Reply to: Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? posted by Marie Alise on October 30, 2001 at 13:38:46:

Marie,

Since you will be a Certified Nutritionist and will affect people's lives, please study a little more the topic of dietary fats. Your recommendation to keep saturated fats down to 10% total caloric intake worries me. The following sources are good ones:

- Facts about Fats
- The Cholesterol Myths
- book called Know Your Fats: The Complete Primer for Understanding the Nutrition of Fats, Oils and Cholesterol by Mary Enig, Ph.D

Just study these and make up your mind later. And also read another opinion on the Smart Fats book at http://www.westonaprice.org/book_reviews/smartfats.html



Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine?

Posted by Nutmeg on October 30, 2001 at 16:56:59:

In Reply to: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? posted by Colby on October 30, 2001 at 13:06:28:

I'm totally off dairy now too (for 8 weeks, anyway, to see what happens) and I find I'm not missing the butter much. I would if ate popcorn or a baked potato, though! I had a baked yam the other day and it tasted fine without butter. I don't ever put butter on steamed veggies, so I don't feel deprived that way.

For sauteeing or stir-frying veggies and/or meat I use almond oil (better for higher temperatures) or cold-pressed extra virgin organic olive oil (low temperature).

For toast spread in the morning, I like almond butter topped with a mixture of ground flax seeds, sunflower seeds, and almonds. Health food stores carry other nut and soy butters, depending on your preferences and diet. Fruit-sweetened jam-type spread is good, alone or with nut butters, if it's allowable on your diet. I also like flavored hummus (chick-pea spread--but check ingredients carefully), fresh sliced or mashed avocado, and I bought some tahini (sesame butter) to try. If I have a boiled egg on toast, I don't bother with butter, and it tastes just fine.

Hope you find something you like.

Nutmeg



Butter! benefical?

Posted by Helping You on October 30, 2001 at 20:34:41:

In Reply to: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? posted by Colby on October 30, 2001 at 13:06:28:

olive oil would do it.

Just a note: Butter, although a dairy product, does not contain the most allergenic/difficult-to-digest components of milk (casein, lactose). Butter is highly digestible and is one of the best sources for Vitamin A and D. It contains CLA which is an essential fatty acid that helps preserve muslce mass and fight fat. Also, it contains something called Butyrate. Butyrate is produced when bifidus ferments fiber in the colon. It helps prevent colitis, colon cancer and fuels the lining of the colon. It seems like butter is something we would WANT in our diets.

-HY



Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine?

Posted by Marie Alise on October 31, 2001 at 09:03:00:

In Reply to: Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? posted by R. on October 30, 2001 at 16:45:51:

Thanks for your concern for humanity, but I've read everything by Mary Enig and have about 8 books on fats. I stand by my recommendation.
Cheers,
MA

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Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? (Archive in dairy.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on October 31, 2001 at 09:20:19:

In Reply to: Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? posted by Nutmeg on October 30, 2001 at 16:56:59:

Thanks, Nutmeg.

Great post!

Walt

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Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine?

Posted by Walt Stoll on October 31, 2001 at 09:21:19:

In Reply to: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? posted by Colby on October 30, 2001 at 13:06:28:

Hi, Colby.

Personally, I do not see much wrong with butter.

Walt

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Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? (10% fat [therapeutic] diet misunderstanding)

Posted by Walt Stoll on October 31, 2001 at 09:24:38:

In Reply to: Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? posted by R. on October 30, 2001 at 16:45:51:

Thanks, R.

If you will read closely you will see that the 10% fat diet is for a THERAPEUTIC DIET ONLY! After a year, and the atherosclerosis is gone, the % needs to be raised to 15% for maintenance.

Walt



Butter it shall be!

Posted by
Colby on October 31, 2001 at 09:38:22:

In Reply to: Butter! benefical? posted by Helping You on October 30, 2001 at 20:34:41:

Thanks everyone... I really didnt want to give up butter! But i hadnt done much research yet as to its method of production in comparison to milk or its vitamin/mineral content. Thanks for the information.

-Colby



Follow-up to R and Dr. Stoll........

Posted by Helping You on October 31, 2001 at 11:33:36:

In Reply to: Re: Alternatives to Butter and Margarine? (10% fat [therapeutic] diet misunderstanding) posted by Walt Stoll on October 31, 2001 at 09:24:38:

I am familiar with the work of Weston Price and the facts that you quote. I agree with Dr. Price and follow many of his dietary guidelines myself. The one thing we need to be careful of, is thinking that we can live in the same way as traditional cultures and have exactly the same health benefits. At first, this seems like a not-very-well thought out statement but keep reading.

Traditional people's live in isolation of other peoples. They know their heritige, they are born to the land and eat from that same land, they don't have the stresses, the insane scheduals, and environmental polutions as we have here. Therefore, it would seem logical that our dietary needs would be altered. My feelings, and these are just my feelings, are that we need to adjust this great dietary wisdom to our own individual situations. The situation regarding fats is a tricky one. Saturated fats are indeed healthy fats but there does come a point where too much of a good thing brings trouble. Maybe traditional peoples can eat all the saturated fats they want but I believe that many of us would do well to still keep these fats to a moderate amount of about 15% as Dr. Stoll recommends. Even 10% saturated fats are ok for most people if they would only increase the amounts of other EFA's and lower their consumption of grains, starches. and vegetable oils. This, I think, would add many health benefits and negate any possible harm of too much saturated fats in the diet

-HY



Re: Follow-up to R and Dr. Stoll........

Posted by R. on October 31, 2001 at 15:24:11:

In Reply to: Follow-up to R and Dr. Stoll........ posted by Helping You on October 31, 2001 at 11:33:36:

HY, I agree with what you said in the beginning. We shouldn't assume that everything that other cultures do that seems to benefit them will automatically benefit us too if we blindly copy their actions. Doing so may or may not be correct, so we need to be cautious.

What I have problems with is these numbers (10%, 15%, etc.). There is a large amount of evidence that belief that saturated fats damage arteries is very questionable at best, if not baseless at all. Uffe Ravnskov makes a good case for it. Ray Peat argues, and has evidence to back up his claims, that unsaturates (especially polyunsaturates) are harmful: suppress immune system, suppress thyroid function. They are used IV for transplant patients. So, if EFA's are really essential, how much is too much? Maybe it's polyunsaturates that need to be limited?

Also, there's strong evidence that it's insulin that damages arteries, not fats. Dr. Atkin has noticed that state of the arteries improves when carbs are reduced, regardless of fat intake. Dr. Ron Rosedale, in his article Insulin and Its Metabolic Effects, says the same thing. And Dr. Mercola's practice supports that. By the way, Dr. Enig doesn't agree with Dr. Rosedale's statements about saturated fats. Actually, he contradicts himself regarding this. First, he says, that it's carbs causing insulin resistence that is the culprit, but then he recommends limiting saturated fats. Go figure.

I guess my point is that since there's no good scientific evidence that saturates are harmful beyond 10% or 15%, why limit it? What does stress have to do with saturates? Maybe it does, but what is the connection? I would actually think that saturates are better because they are more stable than unsaturates, and eating them reduces physiological stress. Why pick on saturate fats? What have they done to you, people, do deserve it? :) <-- that's a smile sign, for those who missed it again.

I hope I was clear enough in expressing my thoughts.



Re: Follow-up to R and Dr. Stoll........

Posted by Helping You on October 31, 2001 at 16:52:30:

In Reply to: Re: Follow-up to R and Dr. Stoll........ posted by R. on October 31, 2001 at 15:24:11:

I agree with everything you said. In your closing statement, you said, "if there is no evidence that saturated fats harm the arteries, why limit it"? Well, I see your point but it's like anything else. Too much of a good thing isn't so good anymore.

Lastly, you are right, it is carbohydrates and polyunsaturated vegetable oils that are causing a lot of these problems.

-HY

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Re: Follow-up to R and Dr. Stoll........

Posted by Marie Alise on November 01, 2001 at 07:18:46:

In Reply to: Re: Follow-up to R and Dr. Stoll........ posted by R. on October 31, 2001 at 15:24:11:

R-

I have more time today, so I just wanted to add in some food for thought. Nothing is more controversial in nutrition & disease than the subject of fats. The most imp. fact that everyone is finally agreeing on is that transfats are the major dietary contributor to heart disease, Diabetes II & stroke. It's suspected in more diseases. That's more imp than this sat'd fat debate, in my opinion.

That said, eating unlimited saturated fats is truly rolling the dice for several reasons. The enzymatic pathway that saturated fats take to successfully convert to prostaglandins, etc relies primarily on Omega 3 fatty acids. If you're not consuming enough Omega 3's and Omega 6's, the saturated fats don't successfully convert and in your complex body--it then acts like a transfat.(reference "Textbook of Natural Medicine", 2nd edition;available from Amazon) And if you're consuming enough Omega 3's & 6's with this unlimited saturated fats intake, you are stressing out your lymph nodes and your liver big time. It's just as dangerous as not getting enough essential fats.

It's like Vitamins C & E-- they are vital to good health...to a point. If you consume beyond that, they turn on you.

Cheers,
MA

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Re: Follow-up to R and Dr. Stoll........(Archive in atherosclerosis.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on November 01, 2001 at 10:07:52:

In Reply to: Re: Follow-up to R and Dr. Stoll........ posted by R. on October 31, 2001 at 15:24:11:

Thanks, R.

First of all, basicallly, we are ALL pretty ignorant about how this all works. The one thing that has been documented, though, is that with those with documented terminal coronary heart disease, a therapeutic diet of less than 10% of the total calories as fat will reverse the symptoms within 30 days (90% of people) and produce arteriogram reductions of blockage within a year with total clearing within 5 years.

This does NOT mean that fat is the only cause of this condition! However, no one can argue with the results. Inflammatory changes, hyperhomocysteinemia, stress, hypertension, diabetes, etc., are ALL known to contribute to this condition (atherosclerosis). However, other than the hyperhomocysteinemia, changing the total calories as fat is still the easiest one to change.

Of course, all of this is determined by the genetic structure of our inheritance. How to determine which of us have to do what is still in the research stages.

Hope this helps you understand (as best as the rest of us understand) what is known so far.

Namaste`

Walt

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Re: Butter it shall be!

Posted by Meg on November 03, 2001 at 19:04:45:

In Reply to: Butter it shall be! posted by Colby on October 31, 2001 at 09:38:22:

Please try Ghee!!! It is much better than butter, but made from butter. Recipe: Melt butter in heavy saucepan, not aluminum of course! on low heat melt butter and continue to cook until there's a crusty covering on top, the butter beneath is perfectly clear and deep gold, and the milk solids are brown, 40min. to one hour, strain through cheese cloth and remove all milk solids, ghee will keep at room temp. for a VERY long time.

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