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Few questions about calcium

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Few questions about calcium

Posted by Jennifer on August 24, 2003 at 22:25:10:

1. What happens to unabsorbed calcium?
2. Is the calcium hydroxyapatite called something else also or does diabasic calcium contain hydroxyapatite?

When reading the calcium archives, I ran into the one discussing that chinese people only consume about 100mg daily, but seem to rarely have problems with osteoporosis. Could this be due that they actually do physical things with their bodies? More labor, carrying heavy items, walking etc?



Re: Few questions about calcium

Posted by S.H.A.P.E. on August 25, 2003 at 08:50:03:

In Reply to: Few questions about calcium posted by Jennifer on August 24, 2003 at 22:25:10:

Unabsorbed calcium ends up blocking your arteries. It's my suggestion that you acquire your required amount of calcium form consuming one cup of a dark green veggie, like spinach everyday day or so. It's much more important for "Bone Health" that you take 2 to 3 teaspoons of liquid magnesium everyday because magnesium is what helps the calcium to absorb into your bones and the liquid form of magnesium is much more absorbable than a capsule or tablet. It's been proven that 99% of the population is deficient in magnesium. Magnesium also protects your heart because it's the small amount of magnesium that in the aspirin, which is responsible for protecting the heart that conventional doctors recommend. Magnesium also relaxes the muscles/tissues, which helps with stress/bracing, whereas, taking calcium supplements only leads to more tension in your body. * S.H.A.P.E. *



Re: Few questions about calcium

Posted by Walt Stoll on August 25, 2003 at 10:35:49:

In Reply to: Few questions about calcium posted by Jennifer on August 24, 2003 at 22:25:10:

Hi, Jennifer.

Listen to SHAPE.

In my experience it must say hydroxyapatite on the label for it to be effective. The best brands also have boron added.

Walt

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Re: Few questions about calcium

Posted by peterb on August 26, 2003 at 11:00:59:

In Reply to: Re: Few questions about calcium posted by S.H.A.P.E. on August 25, 2003 at 08:50:03:

may I ask what liquid mag you like?

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Re: Few questions about calcium

Posted by peterb on August 26, 2003 at 11:23:20:

In Reply to: Few questions about calcium posted by Jennifer on August 24, 2003 at 22:25:10:

The National Institute of Health Consensus Conference on Optimum Calcium Intake recommends 1,000 to 1,500 mg of total calcium per day, which includes calcium from dietary sources (estimated to be 700 milligrams daily.) An additional 500-800mg of supplemental calcium would achieve the recommended daily intake. Some of the many forms of calcium include citrate, malate, lactate, gluconate, and hydroxyapatite. Food-state calcium, however, has been shown to be superior to calcium isolates in terms of utilization at the cellular level. For example, it may require 500mg of a calcium isolate to provide the benefit of just 200mg of food-state calcium.

Clinical recommendations continue to focus on the use of nutrient isolates due to reliance on those substances in clinical research. However, food-source calcium, or food-state supplements, are probably superior in function and may be available at a lower cost per unit of utilizable nutrient. Be aware that clinical research suggests isolates of both vitamins and minerals can result in toxicity at unusually high doses and are less safe than their food-state forms. They may also be less effective due to the absence of a natural food complex.

An opposing view of the benefits in mega-dosing of calcium (or magesium) is seen in the extremely low incidence of osteoporosis in the Chinese population, despite the absence of calcium supplementation. In fact, the Chinese consume not more than 400mg of calcium per day! This suggests that western doctors have assumed a relationship of calcium deficiency to osteoporosis where one does not exist. More likely causative factors for development of osteoporosis are a combination of factors, such as endocrine disease (ie., estrogen dominance), thyroidism, HRT, obesity, anaemia, stress, consumption of refined foods, coffee, processed sugars, even the improper use of mineral supplements, and a lack of progesterone as we age. None of these factors requires a chronic calcium deficiency and could exist in the presence of adequate dietary intake of this mineral. Clearly, the application of "therapeutic" doses of calcium would be useless in alleviating these diverse conditions.

It is important to obtain satisfactory levels of calcium in the diet but also to recognize the complex nature of osteoporosis and the need to address this disease on more than one level.



Re: Few questions about calcium

Posted by bing on August 26, 2003 at 12:21:09:

In Reply to: Few questions about calcium posted by Jennifer on August 24, 2003 at 22:25:10:

About your question on the Chinese lifestyle: there are many factors. Being physically active is one; diet is another, since they get sufficient magnesium from whole grains and beans; they also eat much less meat, very little (or none) diary, a lot more green leafy vegetables, no coffee, very little refined sugar; they also spend more time outdoors to get sunligh, etc.

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Re: Few questions about calcium

Posted by Vince F on August 26, 2003 at 16:33:57:

In Reply to: Few questions about calcium posted by Jennifer on August 24, 2003 at 22:25:10:

They are saying that our bones get dense as we are growing
and wemen have a problem if when young they restrict their
diet to keep slim and work out a lot. HBO sports did a
piece on the, Female Athelete Triode. They showed X rays
of wemen who were around 30 and had Very little density.
They said they could walk off a curb and brake a bone.
Supposed to be relted to hormones, weight, and activity

I believe that once we mature we just keep the density
that we developed though they say that exercize can
strengthen them, it sounds like Not past a point we
developed. Calcium moves around in the bones normally by
acid in our systems and if too much acid the calcium leaves
the bones and is dumped.

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Re: Few questions about calcium (Archive in osteoporosis.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on August 27, 2003 at 08:02:31:

In Reply to: Re: Few questions about calcium posted by peterb on August 26, 2003 at 11:23:20:

Thanks, PeterB.

Namaste`

Walt

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