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Bringing a fever down

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Bringing a fever down

Posted by Mary [69.123] on April 22, 2004 at 00:25:20:

Hi Walt,

Got a question. My roommate came down with a virus accompanied by a fever. Last night he went to bed with an ice pack on his forehead.

Today he went to his doc. The doc told him that he should never place an ice pack on the forehead because it will INCREASE the temp., not reduce it.

Is this true??

Thanks,

Mary



Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 03:39:30:

In Reply to: Bringing a fever down posted by Mary [69.123] on April 22, 2004 at 00:25:20:

Hi Mary, I'm not Walt, but will add my 2 cents.

The body creates a fever for a very good purpose - for every degree the body temperature raises, the body creates thousands of more white blood cells with which to defend itself. Sweating also increases, which sends heat and toxins out via the skin. It uses the fever as a immune tool to kill viruses and expel toxins in the body. Bringing the fever down with cold will suppress your immune system and add power to the virus/fever stimulator. It could cause your body to produce a higher fever in response because it's trying to counteract the cold in order to make sure the virus does not take over the body.

Many healers use wet heat (baths) to encourage the body to sweat and lose body heat in order to help the body accomplish what it is already trying to do. This brings the fever down quicker because the "attacker" is overcome and the toxins are expelled. Cold applications suppress this process.



Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by Maz [1200.624] on April 22, 2004 at 05:18:05:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 03:39:30:

Thessa, this is interesting and your logic seems correct to me.

However, I remember some years ago seeing a tv program in which a small boy of age 5 or 6 was running a very very high fever. I think his temperature was dangerously high and they held him under a cold shower. Apparently, this saved his life. Not sure what to make of it now.

I do believe the body does things for a purpose and have always wondered why docs say take this to bring down the temperature. I thought docs were supposed to know about these things!

Maz



Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 07:57:29:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by Maz [1200.624] on April 22, 2004 at 05:18:05:

Hi Maz, I know there is a lot of disagreement in the field on this issue.

Personally I don't have experience with very high fevers which are considered life threatening and heat/cold. Dr. Christopher was very adamant though on his experience and opinion regarding high fevers. According to him a fever will not go above 107 degrees F, and as long as the fever is kept "wet", there will be no cell damage. The cell damage comes from dry heat. I always thought his opinion was interesting.




Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by Marion [68.376] on April 22, 2004 at 08:49:45:

In Reply to: Bringing a fever down posted by Mary [69.123] on April 22, 2004 at 00:25:20:

Hi - I have always thought that if a child's fever goes above 103 degrees, he should be given tylenol or have cool water cloths placed on him (also the cool baths you mentioned). This, I was told, is so that he won't have a seizure in case his fever gets too high. My daughter once had a high fever and was delerious, and the pediatrician said to do this. I would like to know more about this - very interesting!

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Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by Steve [135.4] on April 22, 2004 at 08:51:32:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 07:57:29:

thessa,

You are correct..A fever is the bodies way of fitting infection..But a real high fever can be life threating..

Silver Fox!



Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 08:58:51:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by Steve [135.4] on April 22, 2004 at 08:51:32:

So are you arguing that Dr. Christopher's approach to high fever (it will only go so high, keep it wet and it will not be life threatening) is wrong?



Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by DrDave [1744.14] on April 22, 2004 at 09:15:30:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 08:58:51:

I'm unclear as to what "keep it wet" means exactly. And how that makes a difference.



Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by Steve [135.4] on April 22, 2004 at 09:20:31:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 08:58:51:

Not arguing anything..I would let a fever run it's course but would not let it go to high for too long..Dehydration can be a problem with a high fever..Most people and childern don't drink enough water when sick..It's not something I worry about anyway..It has been at least 2 years since I last had a fever..Get your immune system healthly and don't get sick..Silver Fox!



Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 10:07:02:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by DrDave [1744.14] on April 22, 2004 at 09:15:30:

Hi DrDave, "keep it wet" is just my short cut for saying that fluids should be replenished at a higher input than they are put out (orally) and if any methods are used to aid the body, they should be wet methods like hydrotherapy as opposed to a dry heat.



Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 10:09:15:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by Steve [135.4] on April 22, 2004 at 09:20:31:

Hmm, just interested in your POV, not being confrontational... I agree, most people don't drink enough water at all, especially when sick, and this is a part of keeping the fever "wet".

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Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 10:29:01:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 10:07:02:

Oh, but I didn't say how it makes a difference... The way he explained it was that dry heat causes cell damage, but wet heat no... It makes sense actually because cells without a certain level of moisture die, and heat would speed up the usage of moisture. Heat also increases the permeability of the cell membranes, and it makes sense that moisture would be a factor here as well. i.e. the more moisture the more flexible the cell membrane and the less likely it is to break or collapse.

I don't know specifics beyond that however, which would be required for a much better explaination for either side of this issue.



Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by Steve [135.4] on April 22, 2004 at 12:52:56:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 10:29:01:

I agree with the idea but it is very hard to keep enough water in a small child or an old person..Silver Fox!

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Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by June.one [294.14] on April 22, 2004 at 15:35:32:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by thessa [112.10] on April 22, 2004 at 08:58:51:

I'd argue that its not worth taking the chance he's wrong. Once my children hit a fever of 103 I take fever reducing measures. Until that point I let the body duke it out.



Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by coldjam [266.376] on April 22, 2004 at 18:16:23:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by June.one [294.14] on April 22, 2004 at 15:35:32:

I'd have to agree due to personal experience. My daughter was probably under 1 year of age. Her fever spiked, and she put her head back and rolled her eyes and had a seizure. Not having delt with this before, off we went to the emergency room.There,they gave her oral tylenol,(which she promptly threw up all over me!)And had me give her a tempid bath there in the hospital. That brought the temp down a bit and she did not have anymore seizures. They told me there shouldn't be any damage from the seizures, and there wasn't...She graduated with honors a couple of years ago. It was scary, but I learned from it, and with my next child, saved myself some hospital bills!



Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by thessa [174.10] on April 23, 2004 at 01:43:52:

In Reply to: Re: Bringing a fever down posted by coldjam [266.376] on April 22, 2004 at 18:16:23:

I hear you both. If confronted with the situation of life threatening fever, it's hard to know what I would do myself. Fortunately there's a good chance one would have the opportunity to start sweating out the fever before it reaches life threatening.

Seizures could also be a way for the body to rebalance itself, instead of "something gone wrong".

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Re: Bringing a fever down (Why not taught in kindergarten?) Archive.

Posted by Walt Stoll [9.8] on April 23, 2004 at 06:07:43:

In Reply to: Bringing a fever down posted by Mary [69.123] on April 22, 2004 at 00:25:20:

Hi, Mary.

Probably true.

REMEMBER, until the temperature reaches 102 degrees oral, the immmune function increases 10% for every degree of elevation. SO, until then, fever is very helpful. Once it reaches 103, the very fastest way to turn it down is to use tepid water total body sponging.

Hope this helps.

This is the kind of stuff that should be taught in all kindergartens but, of course, is not!

Walt

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Re: Bringing a fever down

Posted by Mary [69.123] on April 24, 2004 at 15:43:53:

In Reply to: Bringing a fever down posted by Mary [69.123] on April 22, 2004 at 00:25:20:

Thank you all for your responses.

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