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Rolfing- how intense is it?

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Rolfing- how intense is it?

Posted by Steve3 on July 19, 2002 at 16:23:58:

I am considering having the Rolf procedure done. I have come to the conclusion that I am a bracer. I've been doing SR for about a week and I notice that when I am done there are target areas that feel sore. These areas are right flank under rib cage, lower back and shoulders. I have been having many problems for the past year or so- mainly emotional/ physical (gastric upset and anxiety with other typical symptoms of mercury sensativity). I have recently had all my amalgams replaced and I notice that I am coming slowly back to a balance. I am definately feeling better overall, but I still have a long way to go. I have heard from my girlfriend that Rolfing is very intense and can be extremely painful. She seems to think that I should go to a regular masseuse and build my way up to the Rolf procedure. Does anyone have any advice? Thanks in advance.



depends on the rolfer and how bad your structure is...

Posted by labrat on July 19, 2002 at 16:33:42:

In Reply to: Rolfing- how intense is it? posted by Steve3 on July 19, 2002 at 16:23:58:

I would try getting in touch with Rolfers in your area and interview them about how they approach it.

I had it done a couple of years ago and it was only mildly painful during the session and sometimes sore for a week or so after - but it was mostly a "good" sore like working out.

Do a web search for Rolfing and you'll find a couple of organizations where you can find who's practicing in your area.

I highly recommend it.

~~~8>

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Re: Rolfing- how intense is it?

Posted by Rick on July 19, 2002 at 21:28:01:

In Reply to: Rolfing- how intense is it? posted by Steve3 on July 19, 2002 at 16:23:58:

I'm going for a Rolf treatment tomorrow and have been for two years now - I'd suggest that you have a regular deep massage performed two times - a week apart before you get into the Rolf Bodywork!

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Re: Rolfing- how intense is it? (Archive.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on July 20, 2002 at 10:49:04:

In Reply to: Rolfing- how intense is it? posted by Steve3 on July 19, 2002 at 16:23:58:

Hi, Steve3.

Listen to Rick and labrat.

Rolfing, like massage, is like a dance with the therapist doing the leading. Pain is caused by the person getting treated resisting the process. A skillful therapist can tell when the resistance starts and while backing off a little getting the person to "give in" to the process.

The instant the person "gives in" any discomfort disappears.

Let us know your experience. I have personally had two entire (10 session) programs of Rolfing and know whereof I speak.

Walt



Re: Rolfing- how intense is it?

Posted by Happygal on July 20, 2002 at 16:03:28:

In Reply to: Rolfing- how intense is it? posted by Steve3 on July 19, 2002 at 16:23:58:

Hi Steve3,

I've heard both sides of the story -- that it can be painful or not, that it's best to have lots of massage done in advance or not.

My understanding is there are three factors which might cause pain or intensity in a Rolfing session: 1) as Walt says, resistance to the work, 2) the amount of connective tissue adhesion present, 3) the skill of the Rolfer as someone else mentioned.

Personally I consider all of this type of work (deep tissue, Rolfing, AIS stretching) so helpful, I don't mind if it is intense while it is happening (a short period of time) because the benefits over a longer period are so great.

I've never been Rolfed but have had lots of deep tissue work which can sometimes be intense, too. And I've come out of some of those sessions feeling incredibly energized and very good. I've come out of others ready to go home and rest.

Best wishes,
Happygal (Certified Massage Therapist)



Re: Rolfing- how intense is it?

Posted by Steve on July 20, 2002 at 23:14:34:

In Reply to: Re: Rolfing- how intense is it? posted by Happygal on July 20, 2002 at 16:03:28:

Thanks everyone. I had a massage today and it was great- albeit a little short. (30 mins + 10 mins lagniappe) I felt very relaxed. This was my first time ever being massaged by a professional and the only problem was that I thought that the girl giving the massage may have been a little weak. The next time I am going to have someone with a little more power do it. I'll "shop" around.
Every day I get better. The future is no place for the past. The present is precious.
Peace



Re: Rolfing- how intense is it?

Posted by Happygal on July 22, 2002 at 13:48:41:

In Reply to: Re: Rolfing- how intense is it? posted by Steve on July 20, 2002 at 23:14:34:

Hi Steve,

Congratulations at getting your first massage!

I agree, it's a good idea to shop around until you find someone you are comfortable with.

However, also remember to give your practitioner feedback about your comfort level, depth of pressure, etc. She may not have been "weak." When I give people their first massage, I often am slightly more gentle since it is a new experience for them and some people react strongly to even the slightest bit of discomfort.

The other thing I wanted to tell you about Rolfing, is to call around and talk to 4 or 5 rolfers on the phone about how intense it is. After you've talked to a number of them, you'll have a good idea about what to expect and which one might give you the best work.

Regards,
Happygal (Certified Massage Therapist)



thanks happygal-nmi

Posted by steve on July 23, 2002 at 16:32:21:

In Reply to: Re: Rolfing- how intense is it? posted by Happygal on July 22, 2002 at 13:48:41:

nmi

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Re: Rolfing- how intense is it? (Archive.)

Posted by Nutmeg on July 25, 2002 at 20:12:59:

In Reply to: Re: Rolfing- how intense is it? (Archive.) posted by Walt Stoll on July 20, 2002 at 10:49:04:

Not to be disagreeable :-) but I asked my Rolfer today about this statement and he said "That's baloney". Of course, everyone has a different tolerance to pain, and some resist more than others, but it's not always as simple as bracing or tensing the muscles in response to the pressure of Rolfing in painful areas. As Happygal mentioned, there can also be extensive development of adhesions, connective tissue overgrowth, collagen webs, and other products of the body's response to years of bracing, misalignment, and structural problems. I have plenty of this and it hurts like heck to mobilize and release it.

I'm glad to know that your Rolfing experiences were relatively painless, but I really think you were the exception rather than the rule. Lucky you!! Even the Rolfing/Yoga book you recommend (can't think of the author the author's name right now) says pain is normal during the Rolfing process because in order to heal people, the practitioner must touch them where they hurt.

I certainly have had plenty of pain in my 7 sessions (so far), but I have also experienced great and immediate relief. My Rolfer said than it his 30+ years of experience, he only encountered one person (a mystic and world leader in the field of enlightenment) who did not suffer at least some discomfort during their Rolfing sessions.

Nutmeg



Re: Rolfing- how intense is it? (Archive.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on July 26, 2002 at 11:50:10:

In Reply to: Re: Rolfing- how intense is it? (Archive.) posted by Nutmeg on July 25, 2002 at 20:12:59:

Thanks, Nutmeg.

This is not the Rolfer I would go to. He obviously does not see this as a dancing relationship--which is one of the first things taught at the Rolfing Institute.

Try a woman.

Certainly there can be "adhesions, etc." however even they can be teased apart if the rolfee can relax into the pain.

This is not as easy as it sounds but IS definitely the way to go since the alternative is unnecessary pain.

Walt



Re: Rolfing- how intense is it? (Archive.)

Posted by Nutmeg on July 28, 2002 at 02:35:26:

In Reply to: Re: Rolfing- how intense is it? (Archive.) posted by Walt Stoll on July 26, 2002 at 11:50:10:

Hmmm, I think some of the difference in approaches between your Rolfer and mine might stem from they received their training. I posted another message about this--link below. I think the important thing is to make sure you go to someone you feel comfortable with on all levels, who is respectful to you as a person, and competent in their abilities.

I am definitely keeping my Rolfer because I trust my instincts about the work he is doing and the results I am experiencing. There was just too much coincidence about how I found out about him and the timing of my call for me not to believe that the universe was leading me there. He is respectful, humble about his abilities, acknowledges that no one has perfect knowledge and there is much left to learn, and I really believe he is doing Ida's work the way she taught him to do it.

I do try to relax and breathe into the pain and feel the sore areas giving up more easily when I do that, but some of these problem areas are so long-standing (~25 years) that I don't think it could come easily with any practitioner. He does ebb and flow in intensity, based on my reactions. None of my other body work has ever been this effective.

I've really enjoyed my Rolfing sessions so far and felt very comfortable during this very personal process of healing. I guess we all have to go with what we feel is best for us.

Thanks for your comments, Doc.

Nutmeg

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