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rolfing

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rolfing

Posted by Dan [1051.4274] on September 27, 2007 at 05:56:46:

hello all,

i have been seeing a rolfer. i had one session so far. i have seen rolfing described as crude or visceral. this practioner is neither of these. she is pretty gentle and occasionally will press hard on a muscle knot to cause pain. overall, the session is a smooth ride. i did feel better after the 1st session.

is there a benefit to having a rolfer who is more 'visceral?'

thanks.



Re: rolfing

Posted by Michele [2503.4192] on September 27, 2007 at 10:02:07:

In Reply to: rolfing posted by Dan [1051.4274] on September 27, 2007 at 05:56:46:

I think that in whole any massage is great but the BEST muscle work
out you can do is YOUR own - from the inside out, self instituted by
muscle building and stretching.... NOTHING is as good as a fine tuned
body.



Re: rolfing

Posted by Dan [1051.4274] on September 27, 2007 at 11:30:23:

In Reply to: Re: rolfing posted by Michele [2503.4192] on September 27, 2007 at 10:02:07:

not sure how that answers my question. thanks though!

Follow Ups:


Re: rolfing

Posted by Nutmeg [4785.74] on September 27, 2007 at 11:49:05:

In Reply to: Re: rolfing posted by Michele [2503.4192] on September 27, 2007 at 10:02:07:

Hi Michele,

Just a note here--this is difficult to impossible to accomplish for people who are in too much pain and too deconditioned for even mild exercise. Even moderate stretching can set someone with serious musculoskeletal dysfunction back to bedrest.

Not saying this is the case with Dan or anyone else we know, just more of a general comment.

Thanks,
Nutmeg



Re: rolfing

Posted by labrat [1119.4274] on September 27, 2007 at 11:50:10:

In Reply to: rolfing posted by Dan [1051.4274] on September 27, 2007 at 05:56:46:

Hi Dan.

I swear, I'm not 'following you around' to see if I can answer your questions! It seems that you are on a similar journey to my own however, so I guess I will have some comments for you going forward! :-)

I was Rolfed, also by a Rolfer who was not rough. I don't think there is any benefit to having someone hurt you just because they are strong or rough.

My experience DID include some painful sessions - my Rolfer told me she needed to press with equal force to the resistance she felt in any particular area. As you will learn, you carry your tension in different areas...some more than others, and THOSE areas will probably cause you some grimacing!

Did you find you are breathing better after your first session? I was so surprised to find I had been holding my breath. When she asked me why I thought I was holding it right behind my sternum (instead of breathing in with my whole lungs), I could only answer that I was afraid I'd need it for later!

I really gained a LOT of insight through Rolfing and ended up being very close friends with my Rolfer at the end of it. We had great conversations about the body and muscles, and she always explained what she was doing as she was doing it. I did have some emotional release as well.

My reason for going was to help me in my SR - I couldn't relax my body enough to let my mind go where it needed to go. I got a lot more out of it than that.

Anyway, to answer your question, I think I prefer an intuitive Rolfer over a visceral one!

~~~8>



Re: rolfing

Posted by labrat [1119.4274] on September 27, 2007 at 11:54:16:

In Reply to: Re: rolfing posted by Nutmeg [4785.74] on September 27, 2007 at 11:49:05:

Agreed Nutmeg,

my spouse has a lot of atrophy and has often overdone it when he's feeling well!

Also, I'd like to add that if you're fascia is not aligned properly - if you have had an accident an/or muscle cramping - you would benefit from having everything aligned before trying to work out yourself. Rolfing seeks to provide symmetry - with any structural integration issues, you need to be very careful not to make the problem worse.

~~~8>

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Re: rolfing

Posted by Nutmeg [4785.74] on September 27, 2007 at 12:00:14:

In Reply to: rolfing posted by Dan [1051.4274] on September 27, 2007 at 05:56:46:

Hi Dan,

It's my opinion that the best kind of Rolfer is the one you feel most comfortable with and get the most benefit from. There are several schools of thought and training with Rolfing, so just go with what brings you relief and know that if you don't get the results you expected or desired, you can always try another approach. Sounds like you have a good one for you.

You may have seen some of my posts about Rolfing---my experience was different than yours because I went to a Rolfer who worked deeply and intensely. I have a lot of pain and dysfunction of many years' duration to overcome, so it needed to be done to make progress. I did have vast improvements during and after each treatment, but then made great strides backwards after that. I kept going back to Rolfing because it did work, but didn't last. I had 3 separate series of 11 treatments each over about 3-4 years before I gave up on it. My MD still hounds me to continue with Rolfing, but I don't want to do any more of that right now. In my case, I think the Rolfing did more muscle and soft-tissue damage than good, and the processes that caused the damage (injuries + infection) were not addressed at the time so the processes continued.

Sounds like you are very much on the right track.

Wishing you the best,
Nutmeg

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Re: rolfing

Posted by Dan [7550.2424] on September 27, 2007 at 14:22:33:

In Reply to: Re: rolfing posted by labrat [1119.4274] on September 27, 2007 at 11:50:10:

labrat, with all your knowledge, i invite you to follow me around!
:)

Dan

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Re: rolfing -- Archive, Walt?

Posted by Jan DeCourtney, CMT (Happygal) [7244.4274] on September 27, 2007 at 19:52:24:

In Reply to: rolfing posted by Dan [1051.4274] on September 27, 2007 at 05:56:46:

Hi Dan,

No. If you are seeing improvement, you're working in the right direction. My rolfer is also extremely gentle and she took my health condition to a whole new level.

Best wishes,
Jan

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Re: rolfing

Posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on September 28, 2007 at 06:53:15:

In Reply to: rolfing posted by Dan [1051.4274] on September 27, 2007 at 05:56:46:

Hi, Dan.

If you will remember that Rolfing is "like a dance" and that both the Rolfer and the Rolfee are partners in that "dance", you will do fine.

Walt

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